Urban Planning is a new international peer-reviewed open access journal of urban studies

Open Access Journal | ISSN: 2183-7635

With our themed issues we intended to draw the attention of researchers, policy-makers, scientists and the general public to some of the topics of highest relevance. Scholars interested in editing a themed issue of Urban Planning are encouraged to contact the Editorial Office of the journal (up@cogitatiopress.com).

Published Themed Issues

Published issues are available here.

Upcoming Issues:

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Volume 2, Issue 1

Title: Urban Forms and Future Cities

Editors: Luca D’Acci (Erasmus University Rotterdam, The Netherlands), Ronita Bardhan (Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, India), and Tigran Haas (KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden)

Deadline for Full Papers: 15 December 2016
Issue Release: March 2017

Information: This issue of Urban Planning will be dedicated to urban forms and future cities. This issue aims at collecting both theoretical and empirical research papers, and the themes to be addressed include (but are not limited to): urban utopia, urban quality of life, urban morphologies, green cities, urban forms-urban structures and climate change, history of urban forms, rural versus cities and megacities lifestyle, urban science, and forces shaping cities.

Instructions for Authors: Authors interested in submitting a paper to this issue shall carefully read the Instructions for Authors and submit their full papers through the journal's online submission system by 15 December 2016. Authors are also highly encouraged to send, as early as possible, an abstract to up@cogitatiopress.com for a first assessment of the submission.

Open Access: This journal has an article processing charge to cover its costs, so authors are advised to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees, and if their institutions wish to join Cogitatio’s Membership Program (institutional members enable their authors to publish without having to incur any publication fees). Further information about the journal’s open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

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Volume 2, Issue 2

Title: Smart Cities – Infrastructure and Information

Editors: Harry Timmermans, Soora Rasouli and Dujuan Yang (Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands)


Submission of Full Papers: 15 to 28 February 2017
Issue Release: June 2017

Information: The world is experiencing a period of extreme urbanization. Since 2010, according to the UN Habitat report, more than 50% of the world population lives in urbanized regions. By 2050, this will raise to a staggering 70% of the world population. Cities in the 21st century will account for nearly 90% of global population growth, 80% of wealth creation, and 60% of total energy consumption. This will require planning and building new infrastructure to accommodate more population in a few decades and developing new urban systems that improve the livability of cities while dramatically reducing resource consumption. Understanding cities as a whole and as dynamic systems is crucial for the appropriate planning, design and management of urban systems.

Today, urban planners have high expectations of smart cities. ICT solutions are supposed to complement traditional physical structures to improve the functioning of cities and people’s quality of life. Academic research and industrial applications in the area of Smart Cities seek smart city technology to improve existing city infrastructure, networks, and urban behavior through the deployment and utilization of digital networks.

The motivation underlying the thematic issue is to bring together scholars, professors, researchers, engineers and administrators resorting to state-of-the-art methodologies, technologies and ideas to significantly improve the field of Smart Cities.

Topics include, but are not limited to:
- Smart city theory, modeling, and simulation
- Smart mobility and transportation
- Vehicle-to-infrastructure integration
- Smart grids
- Zero Carbon Cities
- Smart services
- Intelligent infrastructure
- Open data and big data analytics
- Internet of Things (IoT) and smart cities

Instructions for Authors: Authors interested in submitting a paper to this issue shall carefully read the Instructions for Authors and submit their full papers through the journal's online submission system by 28 February 2017. Authors are also highly encouraged to send an abstract to up@cogitatiopress.com for a first assessment of the submission.

Open Access: This journal has an article processing charge to cover its costs, so authors are advised to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees, and if their institutions wish to join Cogitatio’s Membership Program (institutional members enable their authors to publish without having to incur any publication fees). Further information about the journal’s open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

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Volume 2, Issue 3

Title: Social Ecology of Sustainability

Editors: Stephen Wheeler (University of California - Davis, USA), Christina Rosan (Temple University, USA) and Bjoern Hagen (Arizona State University, USA)


Deadline for Full Papers: 30 April 2017
Issue Release: September 2017

Information: What has led some places to be more successful than others at implementing sustainability policies and programs? What can be learned from those examples that will help other cities, regions, states, or nations find similar success? This issue of Urban Planning will explore factors that have promoted sustainability success within large and small jurisdictions worldwide. Authors may consider institutional, political, social, cultural, demographic, economic, technological and/or geographical forces leading to successful implementation of policies and programs, and hopefully will communicate to readers how these factors have evolved over time and what other jurisdictions might learn from them.

Each submission should contain the following:

1) Evidence that the jurisdiction in question has succeeded in moving toward one or more dimensions of sustainability;
2) Evidence that some factors or constellation of factors has played a role in such success;
3) A discussion of underlying hypotheses and theory that would explain this causal connection; and
4) A discussion of how the experience of this jurisdiction might have implications for similar jurisdictions elsewhere.

A variety of research methods may be appropriate for this topic, including case study analysis, comparative case studies, interviews, surveys, and either qualitative or quantitative analysis.

Authors are encouraged to develop specific recommendations on improving the context for sustainability planning in other jurisdictions.

Instructions for Authors: Authors interested in submitting a paper to this issue shall carefully read the Instructions for Authors and submit their full papers through the journal's online submission system by 30 April 2017. Authors are also highly encouraged to send an abstract to up@cogitatiopress.com for a first assessment of the submission.

Open Access: This journal has an article processing charge to cover its costs, so authors are advised to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees, and if their institutions wish to join Cogitatio’s Membership Program (institutional members enable their authors to publish without having to incur any publication fees). Further information about the journal’s open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

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Volume 2, Issue 3

Title: Smart Solutions for Sustainable Cities

Editors: Tom Sanchez (Virginia Tech, USA), Ralph Hall (Virginia Tech, USA) and Nader Afzalan (Redlands University, USA)

Deadline for Abstracts: 31 March 2017
Deadline for Full Papers: 30 April 2017
Issue Release: September 2017

Information: Globally, cities and urban places are adapting to social, economic, technological, and environmental changes. At the same time, we hear terms such as “smart” and “sustainable”, which are popular but amorphous. This is especially the case at the intersection of smart and sustainable urban pursuits. So what does it mean for a city to be “smart” and what does it mean for a city to be “sustainable”? Definitions will likely vary among researchers and among disciplines. This is also likely due to the regional, economic, and demographic context of urban landscapes across the globe. This issue explores smart and sustainable cities to help us understand these concepts, and delve into how particular aspects of future cities will be reflected in new and different settlement patterns. The issue highlights current research and speculates about anticipated changes that will transform urban life.

Topics to be addressed in this issue include, but are not limited to planning paradigms and urban research/technology applications focused on promoting economic, social and environmental well-being related to:
- Water, energy and other resources’ efficient use
- Green building and waste management
- Food systems in urban areas
- Healthy cities and walkability
- Environmentally friendly and socially inclusive transportation
- Economic development
- Social equity and community resilience

Instructions for Authors: Authors interested in submitting a paper to this issue shall carefully read the Instructions for Authors and submit their full papers through the journal's online submission system by 30 April 2017. Authors are also highly encouraged to send, by 31 March 2017, an abstract to up@cogitatiopress.com for a first assessment of the submission.

Open Access: This journal has an article processing charge to cover its costs, so authors are advised to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees, and if their institutions wish to join Cogitatio’s Membership Program (institutional members enable their authors to publish without having to incur any publication fees). Further information about the journal’s open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

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Volume 2, Issue 4

Title: Garden Cities and the Suburbian Antidotes

Editors: Geoffrey Caruso and Markus Hesse (University of Luxembourg, Luxembourg)

Deadline for Full Papers: 30 June 2017
Issue Release: December 2017

Information: Urban population is definitely increasing worldwide and what is known as “urban sprawl” in particular has been largely depicted as a problematic and unsustainable form of urban development. Compact city principles have been presented as perfect antidotes and became the flagship of urban policy over the last 15 years in many Western countries. Increasingly, however, it becomes obvious that too simplistic density policies have been trapped in many difficulties, e.g. low level of acceptance, gentrification and segregation, health and pollution exposure impacts, limited impact on the increasingly complex mobility patterns, mismatch of location, buildings and neighbourhood qualities to lifecycles and new family organizations, difficulties to adapt building stocks to innovative energy infrastructure, urban infill with halo effects on biodiversity corridors, etc. Those traps reflect a still limited understanding of the functioning of suburbs and of the complexity of suburbanization processes.

Rather than equating suburbs to sprawl, this selection of papers considers suburbs as an in-between space—between the city and the countryside, between urban and suburban politics—whose sheer existence and broad distribution across the world calls for transformation towards more sustainable forms of development.

This themed issue is committed to delivering new and profound knowledge about suburbs, and the individuals, institutions, forms and infrastructure therein. It foresees papers that will use diverse but highly complementary approaches, theoretical or empirical, quantitative or qualitative, all embedded within international research literature and academic community. Particularly, we seek to explore two different axes of knowledge:

- Firstly, we present recent analytical insights into the state of city-regional and suburban problems and developments, such as land use, health, transport and urbanization

- Secondly, we investigate the practice of planning for and in suburbia, with a particular—even though not exclusive—focus on initiatives that stress the political in-betweenness or the urban-countryside interfacing, such as the British Garden Cities-initiative (TCPA) or the Gartenstadt21-research (BBSR) in Germany and others.

Instructions for Authors: Authors interested in submitting a paper to this issue shall carefully read the Instructions for Authors and submit their full papers through the journal's online submission system by 30 June 2017. Authors are also highly encouraged to send, as early as possible, an abstract to up@cogitatiopress.com for a first assessment of the submission.

Open Access: This journal has an article processing charge to cover its costs, so authors are advised to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees, and if their institutions wish to join Cogitatio’s Membership Program (institutional members enable their authors to publish without having to incur any publication fees). Further information about the journal’s open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

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