Media and Communication is an international peer-reviewed open access journal dedicated to a wide variety of basic and applied research in communication and its related fields.

Open Access Journal | ISSN: 2183-2439

With our plurithematic issues we intended to draw the attention of researchers, policy-makers, scientists and the general public to some of the topics of highest relevance. Scholars interested in guest editing a thematic issue of Media and Communication are kindly invited to contact the Editorial Office of the journal (mac@cogitatiopress.com).

Published Thematic Issues

Published issues are available here.

Upcoming Issues

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Volume 5, Issue 4

Title: Visual Communication in the Age of Social Media: Conceptual, Theoretical and Methodological Challenges (and Possible Solutions)

Editors: Uta Russmann (FHWien of WKW University of Applied Sciences of Management & Communication, Austria) and Jakob Svensson (Uppsala University, Sweden)

Deadline for Submissions: 31 May 2017
Publication of the Issue: December 2017

Information: With the rise of YouTube, Instagram and Snapchat there has been a visual shift in the social media ecology. Some of the most popular social media platforms in terms of usage primarily focus on visuals such as pictures and videos. Visual communication is also becoming more significant on ubiquitous social media platforms like Facebook and Twitter. The sharing of visual is becoming an integral part of the social media experience, and given that social media platforms are the prime locus for sociability—at least among the young in the West—this visual shift arguably transforms how we relate to, perceive ourselves, each other and the world around us.

The image is a unique object. Images are understood as an additional source of communication complementing written or spoken text. Images suggest reality and create causal relationships. Images help the viewer to achieve coherence faster; they create meaning and foster interaction. Yet, to view this shift to visual social media as merely the return of visual communication would miss the point, because todays social media platforms are multimodal as they allow for the interplay of pictures, videos, hashtags, emoticons as well as text.

In this thematic issue we are particularly interested in the visual shift in social media as well as the transformation of visual communication when brought to the social media ecosystem. This raises conceptual, theoretical and methodological challenges for researchers. For example, is an image on Instagram or Snapchat a static photography or a locus of interaction? How does the social media context change visual communication and in which contexts is it especially interesting to study online visual communication? And how do we conceive and study visual social media platforms?

This thematic issue invites contributions on visual communication in social media that focus on developing a conceptual apparatus and precise definitions of objects/practices of study as well as contributions that address and discuss methodological challenges and (possible) solutions. We are open to theoretical and empirical contributions as well as methodological approaches, which develop and discuss new tools for gathering and analyzing visual communication on social media platforms.

The aim is to bring together contributions on visual social media from a wide variety of communication-related disciplines including media and communication studies, computer-mediated communication, human computer interaction, informatics, sociology, public relations, organizational communication, political communication, new technology, and relating fields to synergize their research on this new topic.

Instructions for AuthorsAuthors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal’s editorial policies. Further information and expressions of interest should be send to mac@cogitatiopress.com

Open Access: The journal has an article processing charge to cover its costs, so authors are advised to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Further information about the journal’s open access charges and institutional memberships can be found here.

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Volume 6, Issue 1

Title: Media History and Democracy

Editor: David Park (Lake Forest College, USA)

Deadline for Abstracts: 30 June 2017
Deadline for Submissions: 30 September 2017
Publication of the Issue: March 2018

Information: The journal Media and Communication hereby announces a thematic issue (to be published in 2018) dedicated to the topic of media history and democracy. Democracy, in its many guises, has long been an influential concern for media historians. The emphasis on democracy in this thematic issue is intended to link up with media histories that take on the intersection of democracy and media as understood through any one of a number of lenses. The issue of democracy brings this thematic issue in contact with numerous approaches to media history. Authors will find connections to be made between democracy and concerns for: history of technology, social history, cultural history, political history, the history of social networks, intellectual history, and more. Democracy need not be conceptualized as a formal political system for this thematic issue, and many authors may find it fruitful to consider the multifarious aspects and meanings of democracy as they reflect on how they might draft a submission to this thematic issue. Media and Communication is an international journal, and we are particularly interested in programming a thematic issue that features historical scholarship from around the world, including manuscripts that address transnational communication flows. This thematic issue of Media and Communication would be a good match for articles addressing the following topics:

  • The history of democratic ideals in the development of media technology;
  • Considerations of democratic formations as they relate to journalism history and historical understandings of the role of journalism;
  • Histories of media as they relate to political activism;
  • The history of alternative and independent media outlets as they relate to democratic processes;
  • The history of public service broadcasting and its applications worldwide or transnationally;
  • Histories of media reform movements;
  • Treatments of the history of literacy and its political meanings;
  • Internet histories as they relate to citizenship or democracy;
  • The historical roles of interpersonal communication and social networks as they relate to democracy;
  • The history of media policies and regulation designed to arrange for (or thwart) democratic communication;
  • Historical themes concerning the relationship between capitalism and democracy.

Instructions for Authors: Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal’s instructions for authors and to send their abstracts (about 200–250 words, with a tentative title and reference to the thematic issue) by email to the Guest Editor by 30 June 2017.

Open Access: The journal has an article processing charge to cover its costs, so authors are advised to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Further information about the journal’s open access charges and institutional memberships can be found here.

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Volume 6, Issue 2

Title: Media and Social Space: Analyzing Mediation and Power

Editors: André Jansson and Johan Lindell (Karlstad University, Sweden)

Deadline for Abstracts: 30 September 2017
Deadline for Submissions:
31 December 2017
Publication of the Issue: June 2018

Information: The media-social space nexus can be approached from a manifold of angles. Examples include Bourdieusian studies of the dispersion of media repertoires in a class structure; Lefebvrian analyses of the significance of media for the social production of spaces and places and their symbolic-material textures; social constructivist interpretations of mediation as a form of world making (following Berger and Luckmann) and mediatization as a form of structuration (following Giddens), as well as numerous other ways of conceptualizing the relationships between social and symbolic power. While differently attuned these views come together in that they allow for the analysis of how media contribute to the reproduction of social space. In our digital age this ensues in complex ways and on different levels. Firstly, it occurs through the classified and classifying media uses of different social groups. Secondly, it occurs through discursive constructions of social and spatial relations. It occurs, thirdly, through a growing number of techno-social machineries that in various (increasingly automated) ways premediate the cultural preferences and socio-spatial practices of different groups. The expansion of locative media, interactive surveillance and, ultimately, what Striphas calls an “algorithmic culture”, goes hand in hand with intensified processes of individualization and globalization that altogether make social power relations at once more fluid and technologically dependent. Still, the term social space per se has not been sufficiently problematized and theorized within the field of media and communication studies. Against this backdrop this thematic issue of Media and Communication brings together leading scholars to shed light on the relationship between media and social space—both theoretically and empirically. The articles assess the relevance of various conceptual frameworks and explore the changing modes of social reproduction characterizing our technologically mediated culture and society.

Instructions for Authors: Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal’s instructions for authors and to send their abstracts (about 200–250 words, with a tentative title and reference to the thematic issue) by email to the Guest Editor by 30 September 2017.

Open Access: The journal has an article processing charge to cover its costs, so authors are advised to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Further information about the journal’s open access charges and institutional memberships can be found here.

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Volume 6, Issue 2

Title: Games Matter? Current Theories and Studies on Digital Games

Editors: Julia Kneer and Ruud Jacobs (Erasmus University Rotterdam, The Netherlands)

Deadline for Abstracts: 15 July 2017
Deadline for Submissions:
31 December 2017
Publication of the Issue: June 2018

Information: Digital games are gaining more and more importance in everyday life. The gaming community is growing each day; games became far more than a basement entertainment for teenagers. Due to this growing interest, academic and public debates go beyond the negative image games once had and are focusing increasingly on positive effects of games such as learning and relaxation. This thematic issue is targeting submissions written for scientists inside and outside the field as well as a broader audience interested in games research. We want to contribute to a deeper understanding about what games researchers were and are investigating, which general scientific results concerning games’ effects are established, and why games research is still important for science as well as for society.

This thematic issue welcomes submissions on topics involving:

  • The social and psychological uses and effects of video games;
  • The cultural affordances, uses, and meanings of games;
  • Serious games;
  • The perception of games;
  • Design research in the context of games;
  • Users’ motivations and emotional, cognitive, and psychophysiological experiences in games.

This content list is far from exhaustive and is provided only as an indication of the scope of inquiry welcomed by this thematic issue on Games Research. Submissions we consider for review:

  • Theoretical and empirical overviews: which have to be anonymous which means all identifying information has to be removed from the paper and at a maximum of 6,000 words, inclusive of figures, tables, and references.
  • Methodological ideas: which have to be anonymous which means all identifying information has to be removed from the paper and at a maximum of 2,000 words, inclusive of figures, tables, and references. A study should accompany the suggested method(s).

Instructions for Authors: Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal’s instructions for authors and to send their abstracts (about 400–500 words, with a tentative title and reference to the thematic issue) by email to the Guest Editors by 15 July 2017. The decision for an invitation for a full paper submission will be given by 31 August 2017 latest. Deadline for full submissions will be 31 December 2017.

Open Access: The journal has an article processing charge to cover its costs, so authors are advised to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Further information about the journal’s open access charges and institutional memberships can be found here.

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Volume 6, Issue 2

TitleMedia and Communication between the Local and the Global

Editors: Jessica Gustafsson (Sodertorn University, Sweden) and Kinga Polynczuk-Alenius (University of Helsinki, Finland)

Deadline for Submissions: 30 November 2017
Publication of the Issue: May/June 2018

Information: This thematic issue is an outcome of the Media, Globalization and Social Change division at the 2017 NordMedia conference held in Tampere, Finland. The papers presented here critically examine the relationship between media and communication and phenomena such as migration, development, social change, gender and consumption. While they employ a wide range of theoretical and methodological approaches, what unites them is the attention to the interplay between the local and the global, the home and the world, the ingroup and humanity at large.

Media and communication are considered amongst the critical forces driving contemporary processes of globalization. As technologies, media and communication connect one to the world and its peoples, both known and unknown. They can also become tools for individuals, communities and societies to impact upon their lived realities. As practices, discourses and artefacts, media and communication serve to highlight and explicate the link between the global processes—such as migration—and structures—such as economic inequalities—and the local realities and everyday lives of the audiences.

With these starting points in mind, the contributions to this thematic issue grapple with the following questions:

  • How does the access to global media and communication technologies alter the lived realities of locally situated individuals?
  • How can media and communication technologies help audiences to stay connected with ‘home’ from which they have been physically dislocated?
  • How do journalists mediate between global phenomena, particularly forced migration, and local audiences?
  • How are the global connections communicated and articulated through the discourses and artefacts of consumption?

Instructions for Authors: Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal’s instructions for authors and submit their full papers through the journal's online system by 30 November 2017.

Open Access: The journal has an article processing charge to cover its costs, so authors are advised to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Further information about the journal’s open access charges and institutional memberships can be found here.

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Volume 6, Issue 3

Title: Multidisciplinary Studies in Media and Communication

Editors: Epp Lauk (University of Jyväskylä, Finland) and Raul Reis (Emerson College, USA)

Deadline for Submissions: 31 March 2018
Publication of the Issue: September 2018

Information: Media and Communication is accepting submissions for a multidisciplinary issue to be released in September 2018. This issue focus on the social development and contemporary transformation of media and communication, and critically reflects on their interdependence with global, individual, media, digital, economic and visual processes of change and innovation. Potential contributions should ponder the social, ethical, and cultural conditions, meanings and consequences of media, the public sphere and organizational as well as interpersonal communication and their complex interrelationships. The journal focuses on the application and advancement of qualitative and quantitative methods of media and communication research, but also encourages scholars to submit manuscripts that introduce innovative and alternative theoretical perspectives.

Instructions for Authors: Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal’s editorial policies. An expression of interest, if possible with an abstract, must be sent to the journal’s staff at mac@cogitatiopress.com by no later than 31 January 2018.

Open Access: The journal has an article processing charge to cover its costs, so authors are advised to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Further information about the journal’s open access charges and institutional memberships can be found here.

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Volume 6, Issue 3

Title: The Turn to Affect and Emotion in Media Studies

Editors: Margreth Lünenborg and Tanja Maier (Freie Universität Berlin, Germany)

Deadline for Abstracts: 9 October 2017
Deadline for Submissions:
1 March 2018
Publication of the Issue: August/September 2018

Information: The social and cultural formations of emotions and affects have been of central interest to social science based emotion research as well as affect studies mainly grounded in cultural studies. Media and communication scholars in turn have especially focused on how emotions and affects are produced by media, the way they are communicated through media, and the forms of emotions audiences develop during the use of media. This thematic issue wants to add to the ongoing research stream of affect studies and the existing emotion research within media and communication studies. A special emphasis will be placed on exploring structures of difference and power in relation to emotions and affects. Please note: We prefer papers with a strong conceptual or theoretical framework or perspective. We especially appreciate contributions to the discussion dealing with (but not limited to) the following aspects:

  • Concepts and theories of affect and emotion research: Approaches based in affect studies and sociology of emotion offer the potential to overcome existing dichotomies between cognition and affect, between the inside and the outside, the psychological and the social. Here, the question arises how these theoretical concepts can be made productive for media and communication studies. In particular, how can we integrate the different approaches with their disparate theoretical presuppositions;
  • Empirical analysis: forms, formats and their audiences: Affects are omnipresent and can be studied in diverse social and mediated forms and formats. This area deals with affects in various media types, genres and formats as well as with explorations of techniques of the affective. For example, questions can be raised about the relationship between affects and technological artefacts, or about the circulation, transformation and renegotiation of affective practices. Contributions may also interrogate the effort and requirements of the performative elements of affective experience. Another area of research examines the affectivity of media appropriation;
  • Methods of affect and emotion research: The conceptual openness and complexities of affects pose methodological challenges to media and communication studies. Therefore, the definition of terms, theoretical development and methodological designs will have to be closely coordinated. Moreover, new empirical procedures will have to be connected to already existing concepts of affects. In this section, we invite presentations on new methods of affect research as well as adaptions of established methods for the research of affects and emotion.

Instructions for Authors: Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal’s instructions for authors and to send their abstracts (about 200–400 words, excluding references, tables, and figures) by email to the Guest Editors by 9 October 2017. After the editors have reviewed the abstracts by mid-October, authors will be asked to submit full-length papers by 1 March 2018. Please notice that being invited to submit a paper is not guaranteeing publication. All articles for this thematic issue follow the same peer review process as regular papers.

Open Access: The journal has an article processing charge to cover its costs, so authors are advised to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Further information about the journal’s open access charges and institutional memberships can be found here.

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Volume 6, Issue 4

Title: News and Participation through and beyond Proprietary Platforms in an Age of Social Media

Editors: Oscar Westlund and Mats Ekström (University of Gothenburg, Sweden)

Deadline for Abstracts: 1 November 2017
Deadline for Submissions:
7 March 2018
Publication of the Issue: November/December 2018

Information: Since the 1990s, prominent scholars have discussed the rise of participation through a variety of concepts, such as collective intelligence, mass self-communication, convergence culture, and produsage—altogether emphasizing the blending of production and consumption. A networked society has emerged in which a plethora of technologies, media and platforms facilitate different kinds of communication and news publishing. In so-called participatory journalism, citizens more readily take part in, and possibly even influence, the news production process. Citizens participate in diverse ways, through mobile, social, and digital media platforms, whether on their own and or in coordination with journalists. By ceding control over some aspects of news production and circulation, journalists thus open up their traditional gatekeeping purview over what’s classified as news. Importantly, the epistemology of participatory journalism may develop in a significantly different way than traditional news journalism, if journalists let go of their professional control and develop new relationships with their audiences.

To date, researchers have typically focused on participatory journalism taking place through news media’s proprietary platforms (e.g., their own websites and applications). Throughout the 2000s many news publishers experimented with, and developed, functionalities for participatory journalism. These mainly involved providing journalists with source material such as photos and videos, as well as possibilities for interpretation through comment functions. Very few have allowed the citizens to participate in other stages of the news production process. Many news publishers have ceased to offer the latter, with reference to difficulties in maintaining a good tone. Others keep on working towards fostering public participation, but are more strategic in the ways they involve the audiences. At the same time, during the past decade, participation in news through social media has become increasingly important and common. Importantly, from the perspective of news media, social media constitute non-proprietary platforms. They have less or no influence over how audiences access and engage with the news via these platforms. Notwithstanding this, citizens engage with the news in new ways. Also, social media have created new opportunities for journalists to broaden their networks of sources.

Research has yet to clarify how citizens (might) shape news products—via both proprietary and non-proprietary platforms—and thereby contribute to the epistemology of (participatory) journalism. For this thematic issue, the guest editors welcome both empirical articles with sound theoretical frameworks as well as conceptual/review articles. More specifically, this thematic issue invites articles focusing on how social actors in news organizations (journalists, technologists, businesspeople), their audiences, as well as citizens and other independent actors mutually influence processes of access/observation, selection/filtering, processing/editing, and publishing in the news. Contributors may address issues including, but not limited to, the following areas:

  • In what ways have journalists appropriated digital-oriented methods that offer new and/or improved ways for scrutinizing material together with citizens?
  • What methods, if any, do journalists use to extract knowledge and inspiration from comments, blogs, and tweets in the first stage of the news production process?
  • Studies into the potential widening of the network of sources journalists turn to, possibly involving citizens more?
  • What processes are followed to evaluate “facts” originating from sources encountered via social media, as opposed to source verification in traditional news journalism?
  • Does participatory journalism articulate knowledge claims differently than traditional news journalism?
  • What are the knowledge-oriented norms, values, and practices applied when publishing and distributing news in participatory journalism?
  • What are the journalists’ perceptions and practices relating to publishing amateur footage, including issues of authenticity and authority?
  • What are the motives and modes of participation through comment fields, walls, tweets etc., in proprietary digital platforms and non-proprietary social media platforms?
  • In what ways, if any, do technologists and businesspeople participate in news production processes?
  • How do news media firms approach audience metrics and audience analytics? (what sorts of analytics are being used, and do these transform the relationshipt to the audience and/or epistemological news production processes?).

The thematic issue will include three invited commentaries:

  • James Katz (Professor, Boston University, USA);
  • Matt Carlson (Associate Professor, Saint Louis University, USA) & Nikki Usher (Associate Professor, The George Washington University, USA);
  • Anette Novak (CEO Interactive Institute, Sweden, and former special investigator the Media Inquiry in Sweden).

Instructions for Authors: Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal’s instructions for authors. If interested in participating, please send to the Guest Editors an extended abstract (500–750 words, with a tentative title and reference to the thematic issue), and an abbreviated bio that describes previous and current research that relates to the issue by 1 November. The decision for an invitation to make a full-paper submission will be given by 21 November 2017. Deadline for full submissions will be 7 March 2018.

Open Access: The journal has an article processing charge to cover its costs, so authors are advised to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Further information about the journal’s open access charges and institutional memberships can be found here.

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Volume 6, Issue 4

Title: E-Government and Smart Cities: Theoretical Reflections and Case Studies

Editors: Peter Mechant (Ghent University, Belgium) and Nils Walravens (Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Belgium)

Deadline for Abstracts: 28 February 2018
Deadline for Submissions:
30 June 2018
Publication of the Issue: November/December 2018

Information: Today, the concepts of e-government and smart city are increasingly used to refer to one another and have started to converge. While e-government was introduced under the flag of better service delivery by focusing on internal processes and the use of ICTs by administrations, the smart city concept nowadays builds on this as a way to foster innovation by collecting, processing, integrating and using data on a larger scale than ever before. This supposedly leads to better-informed decision making and high-quality services, but assumes far more complex partnerships with very diverse stakeholders, such as large and small companies, civil society, academia, individual citizens and so on (triple, quadruple, and quintuple helix models).

In this thematic issue we are particularly interested in contributions that address the concept of ‘e-government’ in the context of smart cities. What does the concept of e-government mean in relation to smart cities? What is the role for and impact on the involved stakeholders? We see three main themes that link to these questions: data, governance and participation. Data is hailed as the “new oil”, but what does this mean for the daily practice of policy makers and smart city stakeholders? The concept of governance shifts as the role of the private sector becomes more opaque and (local) governments explore new financing and business models. Meanwhile, local governments are exploring new forms of participation that are enabled by technology, while facing risks related to i.a. inclusion, media literacy and privacy.

This thematic issue of Media and Communication would be a good match for articles, including case studies as well as theoretical and critical perspectives, addressing (but not limited to) the following topics from inter- or multidisciplinary perspectives:

Data

  • Open (& Linked) Data in government
  • Data- / Evidence-based policy making
  • Smart city monitoring and KPIs
  • Standardisation/Interoperability
  • Privacy challenges

Governance

  • Platform-based governance
  • Smart city business models & governance
  • Power relations in the Smart City
  • Private-public partnerships
  • Decentralisation vs centralisation of government
  • Smart city and commodification of the public space

Communication and Participation

  • Inclusion and civic engagement
  • Media literacy
  • Social media in e-governance
  • Impact of the ‘social’ Web on the public sector
  • Co-creation of public services with citizens and stakeholders
  • Innovative services or methods

The aim is to bring together contributions on e-government in a smart city context from a wide variety of communication-related disciplines, government studies and relating fields to synergize their research on this topic.

Instructions for Authors: Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal’s instructions for authors and to send their extended abstracts (about 400–500 words, with a tentative title and reference to the thematic issue) to the Guest Editors by 28 February 2018.

Open Access: The journal has an article processing charge to cover its costs, so authors are advised to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Further information about the journal’s open access charges and institutional memberships can be found here.

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Volume 7, Issue 1

Title: Journalism and Social Media: Redistribution of Power?

Editors: Marcel Broersma and Scott Eldridge II (University of Groningen, The Netherlands)

Deadline for Abstracts: 1 March 2018
Deadline for Submissions:
30 September 2018
Publication of the Issue: February/March 2019

Information: In the last decade, social media have been fully integrated into journalism practice. This has had an impact on how news is produced, what online news texts look like, and how audiences consume news, and even what we consider “news” and “journalism” to be. This has led some scholars to argue that social media have been “normalized” within existing frameworks, and further that their rise has not had an impact on journalism’s core. Others contend that norms, practices, and forms are fundamentally changing. This would, by extension, suggest a major change in journalism’s relationships with other agents in the networked ecology of news, including its relationship with sources, social media platforms, technology companies, and the citizens their content reaches.

In the wake of a particularly tumultuous year for news and journalism, where social media and its pervasive nature within and around news media and politics have been front and center and where journalism’s public role has been under review, this thematic issue offers an opportunity to conceptualize the relationship between journalism, social media, and the mechanisms of power anew. We invite scholars to contribute papers which advance our understanding of these dynamics, which are increasingly part of our public discussions of news, media, and power within society, through critical and reflective academic study.

This thematic issue focuses on questions of if and how the rise of social media has redistributed power in the news media ecosystem. We invite scholars to explore questions around the functions and roles journalism traditionally fulfilled, and weigh whether and how these have been altered—or taken over—by other players. Exploring how sources can now bypass reporters to get their message across to new audiences, and how citizens can navigate social platforms for news independent of traditional journalism heavyweights, we invite scholars to contribute to debates around this reorientation of media power.

We are interested articles that shed new light across these themes, including papers which explore:

  • The power balance between journalists and sources, including politicians and industry leaders, and where these have changed with the rise of social media;
  • Transformations in journalism practice, epistemology, and (online) news texts that reflect shifting power distributions in the news ecology;
  • Distributors of “fake” news, or commercial message such as native advertising, who get their messages legitimized in news media discourses and the implications of these distributors on news dynamics;
  • Participatory practices, polarized audiences and social media for what they signal about divisions within broader society;
  • Novel methodological approaches to exploring the shifting power relationships between journalism, social media platforms, and other realms of societal power;
  • Other papers which expand our understanding of these dynamics within fields of journalism, media, and communications studies.

Instructions for Authors: Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal’s instructions for authors. If interested,please send an abstract of max. 400 words to the Academic Editors before 1 March 2018. Authors will be notified about acceptance before 21 March 2018. Deadline for the submission of full papers will be 30 September 2018. Final papers can be 8,000 words max.

Open Access: The journal has an article processing charge to cover its costs, so authors are advised to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Further information about the journal’s open access charges and institutional memberships can be found here.

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Volume 7, Issue 1

Title: Media and Minorities

Editors: Leen d’Haenens and Willem Joris (KU Leuven, Belgium)

Deadline for Abstracts: 28 February 2018
Deadline for Submissions:
15 June 2018
Publication of the Issue: February/March 2019

Information: This thematic issue of Media and Communication aims at enriching the debate on media and minorities. The latter can be seen as content of media, and as producers or users of media content on a variety of platforms. This thematic issue welcomes research on media representations on various media outlets, both mainstream and ethnic or niche media, and reactions to these representations from the majority and the minorities. It aims to bring together studies examining which media infrastructure is still in place to cater for minorities in different country contexts, against the background of policies of media representation that have shifted over time.

Present policies of ‘cultural diversity’ are grappling with a paradox: they aim at enhancing ethnic minorities’ representations either on or behind the screens, in newsrooms or management positions, but they are implemented in an era—that of post 9/1—when these minorities, and more particularly those of Muslim faith, are viewed as representing a growing threat for national social cohesion and using an increasing amount of scarce resources. Indeed, policies of cultural diversity may be considered as part of an overall strategy that seeks both to improve existing ethnic minorities’ ‘integration’, to ‘demonize’ potential immigrants and to shift the focus away from arguments for accepting refugees’ applications to enter the countries.

Banking on the above, this thematic issue of Media and Communication seeks to critically address the full spectrum of media and minorities, and examine the field from various imaginative theoretical approaches and new research directions, employing quantitative, qualitative or mixed methodologies. We encourage authors to submit contributions based on original empirical studies regarding (but not necessarily limited to) the following themes:

  • Minority communities, social media and identity;
  • Diversity of identities and diversity of opinions as expressed in media;
  • Media representation of minorities (e.g. minority women);
  • Identity/citizenship, cultural diversity, and integration and the media;
  • Social network analysis: Ties to the country of origin and integration;
  • Diaspora and the media;
  • How minorities use specific minority media to counteract hegemonic discourses;
  • News media diversity: content diversity, user diversity, diversity seen from the angle of the producer;
  • Analysis and critique of gender and sexual discourses, and representations;
  • New media and hegemonic/counterhegemonic discourses;
  • The role of ethnic media, social media, social movements;
  • Alternative media and empowerment of minorities (comics, video blogs, grassroots sites, citizen journalism…);
  • Teaching media diversity: educational initiatives in media curricula, general education and training for media professionals;
  • Human rights/women’s rights in the diaspora and the role of (social) media;
  • Integration policies in different country contexts.

Instructions for Authors: Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal’s instructions for authors. If interested,please send an extended abstract to the Academic Editors, Leen d’Haenens and Willem Joris, before 28 February 2018.

Open Access: The journal has an article processing charge to cover its costs, so authors are advised to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Further information about the journal’s open access charges and institutional memberships can be found here.

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Volume 7, Issue 1

Title: Emerging Technologies in Journalism and Media: International Perspectives on Their Nature and Impact

Editor: John Pavlik (Rutgers University, USA)

Deadline for Abstracts: 15 June 2018
Deadline for Submissions:
30 September 2018
Publication of the Issue: February/March 2019

Information: A wide swath of emerging technologies are reshaping journalism and media in the U.S. and around the world. This thematic issue of Media and Communication provides a series of international perspectives on the nature and impact of these emerging technologies on journalism, media and society. Within this framework, a series of authors from universities around the world offer critical analysis of four dimensions of the impact of changing technology. These dimensions include aspects related to public engagement (e.g., via social media, mobile technology), shifts in content and user interface (e.g., interactivity, augmented reality, VR, voice-based systems), evolving production methods and professional practice (e.g., impact of algorithms, automation and AI), and economic and legal/policy implications (e.g., freedom of expression, privacy). In the context of the theme of public engagement and emerging media, contributors examine the adverse consequences of mobile media usage. These adverse consequences include how youth engage with social and mobile media and the role of addiction in technology usage. Conversely, contributions within the theme of public engagement with emerging media, the contributions will report on the results of a major multi-year, multi-country study examination of mobile content innovation in Qatar and the United Arab Emirates. Wearable technology considered along with hand-held technology. The data reported draw upon multiple methods and place the findings in an international context. As well, research in this thematic context examines virtual worlds and storytelling. Further, research in this context offers an assessment of television and second screen usage and the increasing interconnection between usage of emerging mobile media. In the context of the second theme, the evolving production methods and professional practice fueled by technological change, contributors provide an analysis of algorithms and their role in journalism and media content. Finally, in the context of the structural theme of economic and legal/policy implications of emerging media technology, contributors examine reorganizing the news media for the digital age. Research also considers the impact of emerging technology on public relations.

Themes/research questions to be addressed in the thematic issue:

  • Public engagement (e.g., via social media, mobile technology);
  • Shifts in content and user interface (e.g., interactivity, augmented reality, VR, voice-based systems);
  • Evolving production methods and professional practice (e.g., impact of algorithms, automation and AI);
  • Economic and legal/policy implications (e.g., freedom of expression, privacy).

Instructions for Authors: Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal’s instructions for authors and to send their extended abstracts (about 300 words, with a tentative title and reference to the thematic issue) to the Guest Editor by 15 June 2018.

Open Access: The journal has an article processing charge to cover its costs, so authors are advised to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Further information about the journal’s open access charges and institutional memberships can be found here.

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