The Midlife Crisis of the Network Society

Open Access Journal | ISSN: 2183-2439

Commentary | Open Access

The Midlife Crisis of the Network Society


  • Nikki Usher College of Media, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, USA
  • Matt Carlson Hubbard School of Journalism and Mass Communication, University of Minnesota, USA


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Abstract:  The network society is moving into some sort of middle age, or has at least normalized into the daily set of expectations people have for how they live their lives, not to mention consume news and information. In their adolescence, the technological and temporal affordances that have come with these new digital technologies were supposed to make the world better, or least they could have. There was much we did not foresee, such as the way that this brave new world would turn journalism into distributed content, not only taking away news organizations’ gatekeeping power but also their business model. This is indeed a midlife crisis. The present moment provides a vantage point for stocktaking and the mix of awe, nostalgia, and ruefulness that comes with maturity.

Keywords:  digital journalism; fake news; hybridity; Networks; Media; participation; reflexivity

Published:   8 November 2018


DOI: https://doi.org/10.17645/mac.v6i4.1751


© Nikki Usher, Matt Carlson. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits any use, distribution, and reproduction of the work without further permission provided the original author(s) and source are credited.