Urban Planning is a new international peer-reviewed open access journal of urban studies

Open Access Journal | ISSN: 2183-7635

With our plurithematic issues we intended to draw the attention of researchers, policy-makers, scientists and the general public to some of the topics of highest relevance. Scholars interested in guest editing a thematic issue of Urban Planning are kindly invited to contact the Editorial Office of the journal (up@cogitatiopress.com).

Published Thematic Issues

Published issues are available here.

Upcoming Issues


♦♦♦

Volume 6, Issue 4

Title:
Planning for the Local Impacts of Climate Change: Nobody Left Behind?


Editor(s):
Mark Seasons (University of Waterloo, Canada)

Submission of Abstracts: 1-15 December 2020
Submission of Full Papers: 15-30 April 2021
Publication of the Issue: October/November 2021

Information:

This theme issue explores an emerging, important issue: the implications for urban social equity associated with climate change.

Much is known about the technical, policy and financial tools and strategies that can be applied to mitigate or adapt to climate change in communities. We also know that the local impacts of climate change are experienced differently by socio-economic groups in communities. This is especially the case for the disadvantaged and marginalized—i.e., the poor, the very young, the aged, the disabled and women. Ideally, climate action planning interventions should enhance quality of life, health and wellbeing, and sustainability rather than exacerbate existing problems experienced by the disadvantaged.

Contributions should present and compare perspectives and research from the Global North and South. The geographic focus is urban communities, formal and informal settlements; the scale could be the neighbourhood to the city-region.

Topics to be covered include (but are not limited to) foundational information about climate  change impacts in urban areas, especially in vulnerable communities; the concept of equity in planning practice generally and then in the context of climate change specifically; varying definitions and nature of the disadvantaged in urban communities—e.g., defining these people and why disadvantaged or marginalized; how climate change planning takes place in communities—e.g., process design, role(s) of stakeholders, engagement strategies); the role(s) of local knowledge in decision-making; and reflections on the ethical aspects of climate change responses for planners and planning.

Contributions should share a common concern for the local impacts of climate change, yet offer different disciplinary and theoretical perspectives. These would include public health, urban governance, infrastructure, and gendered approaches to climate change planning and adaptation. Case studies could be used to contextualize discussion of planning theory and practice.


Instructions for Authors:
Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal’s instructions for authors and submit their abstracts (maximum of 250 words, with a tentative title) through the abstracts system (here). When submitting their abstracts, authors are also asked to confirm that they are aware that Urban Planning is an open access journal with a publishing fee if the article is accepted for publication after peer-review (corresponding authors affiliated with our institutional members do not incur this fee).


Open Access:
The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio’s Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal’s open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

♦♦♦

Volume 7, Issue 1

Title:
The Terms of Dwelling: Re-Theorizing Housing through Architecture


Editor(s):
Yael Allweil (Technion - Israel Institute of Technology) and Gaia Caramellino (Politecnico di Milano)

Submission of Abstracts: 1-15 March 2021
Submission of Full Papers: 15-31 July 2021
Publication of the Issue: January/March 2022

Information:
In the framework of the contemporary global housing crisis, housing has a central, unquestioned role for individuals’ access to employment, education, and political citizenship. Hence the current global crisis involves remarkably similar issues, even if the concrete causes of housing disparity seem unrelated. Whether access to housing is challenged through war and persecution; lack of formal planning; or the growing unaffordability of housing as market product, the effects are the same: the reappearance of substandard tenements, lack of housing options, involuntary displacement, and growing spatial and economic inequality.

 

For several decades, architecture has been glaringly absent from both the analysis of and responses to the housing crisis. This is in stark contrast to the history of twentieth-century modern architecture, in which architects played a decisive role in defining mass housing as a social need to be provided as a public good and housing design and production constitutes the ground for architectural and planning experiments, playing a crucial role also in the shaping and transformation of the urban fabric.

Two dominant interpretive frameworks were proposed for this lack. The first is explained by the state’s detachment from the national housing project in the mid-1970s, the dismantling of the welfare state and privatization, and later the neoliberalization of housing markets. In this analysis, the social framework for housing as public good has been removed. The second framework points to the tight constraints of housing design, even at the high end of the market, by regulatory and financial considerations, leaving little room for architects’ expression. Consequently, "architecture" as cultural product is often seen as distinct from and separate from "housing" as a socio-economic need.

Nonetheless, the past few years saw re-emergence of the question of housing design in architects’ education and discussions of architecture’s  role in and contribution to the world's growing socio-economic inequality which is fundamentally rooted in the housing crisis (Schumacher, 2018; Self, 2016). Re-theorizing the architecture of housing as an intrinsic part of the social, financial, political, and territorial aspects of dwelling is an urgent component of the critical assessment of past and current experiences and the goal of providing insights to tackle contemporary challenges.  This thematic issue of Urban Planning intends to question how the architectural discipline can contribute in closing the divorce between housing and architecture, as well as in re-articulating the question of housing as an architectural and planning problem.

The issue proposes to investigate the terminology used to designate housing as a way to question the relation between housing, architecture and planning culture. Contributions could analyze select terms, concepts and notions, considered in relation to their understanding in the housing discourse and practice, contributing to provide a new insight on urban and planning cultures, forms and policies over the 20th century.

Looking at the lexicon used to discuss dwelling, the papers could also examine the multiple origins and changing meanings of the terms, when shared by diverse fields (normative, political, planning, administrative, financial) or migrating across countries, disciplines, and cultures. Sometimes crystallized or re-invented through images produced to advance specific spatial or social meanings, the lexicon can bring together diverging local and global realms, acquiring an international dimension with diverse implication at local level.


Instructions for Authors:
Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's instructions for authors and submit their abstracts (maximum of 250 words, with a tentative title) through the abstracts system (here). When submitting their abstracts, authors are also asked to confirm that they are aware that Urban Planning is an open access journal with a publishing fee if the article is accepted for publication after peer-review (corresponding authors affiliated with our institutional members do not incur this fee).


Open Access:
The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio's Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal's open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

♦♦♦

Volume 7, Issue 1

Title:
City as Flux: Interrogating the Changing Nature of Urban Change


Editor(s):
Aseem Inam (Cardiff University, UK)

Submission of Abstracts: 1-15 December 2020
Submission of Full Papers: 15-30 April 2021
Publication of the Issue: January 2022

Information:

Urbanists—particularly those with backgrounds in professional fields like architecture, landscape architecture, urban design and city planning—tend to be trained to view the city as an object that is planned, designed and built according to definitive visions. In reality, the city is constantly changing at different timescales: by the hour, the week, the year, the decade and the century. Thus, while urban geographers and historians have studied change for quite a while, such thinking has not permeated the world of practice in a meaningful manner. What would be the benefits if urbanism, both as an object of study and as a mode of practice, were to be approached from the perspective of flux rather than just an object? Why would such a reversal of ontological priorities be helpful? It would be helpful for three reasons.

First, it would enable researchers to obtain a more complete understanding of the micro-processes of urban change at work. For example, to understand urbanism more properly one must allow for emergence and surprise, that is, one must consider the possibility of urbanism having ramifications and implications beyond those initially imagined. Second, as well as not knowing much about the micro-processes of change, we often do not know enough about how change is actually accomplished. In order to understand this, we would need analysis of urbanism that was fine-grained enough to show how change was accomplished on the ground—how ideas were translated into action, and by so doing, how they got modified, adapted, and changed. Third, a major cause of dissatisfaction with the traditional approach to change—the approach that gives priority to stability and treats change as an epiphenomenon—is paradigmatic. Strategies for change that are informed by that view often do not produce change, let alone transformation.

This thematic issue invites scholars who study urban change but are also interested in matters of practice, including practices that can lead to meaningful change, such as fundamental urban transformation. Authors are encouraged to present research that challenges our conventional understanding of not only the city as a static object, but also challenges our understanding of how urban change actually occurs.

The thematic issue will thus offer a series of valuable empirical insights as well as theoretical implications for different modes of practice that engage directly with urban change.


Instructions for Authors:
Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's instructions for authors and submit their abstracts (maximum of 250 words, with a tentative title) through the abstracts system (here). When submitting their abstracts, authors are also asked to confirm that they are aware that Urban Planning is an open access journal with a publishing fee if the article is accepted for publication after peer-review (corresponding authors affiliated with our institutional members do not incur this fee).


Open Access:
The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio's Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal's open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

♦♦♦

Volume 7, Issue 1

Title:
Urbanisation, Crisis, and Resilience: The Multiple Dimensions of Urban Transformation in Beirut, Lebanon


Editor(s):
Liliane Buccianti-Barakat (Saint Joseph University, Lebanon) and Markus Hesse (University of Luxembourg)

Submission of Abstracts: 1-15 March 2021
Submission of Full Papers: 15-31 July 2021
Publication of the Issue: January/March 2022

Information:
Beirut’s urban transformation is a subject of significant multi-disciplinary inquiry in the social sciences. Long considered as a crossroads between Asia, Africa and Europe, owing to its strategic location, Beirut gained prominence as a Levantine city in the mid-19th century. Since its independence in 1943, the modern state finds itself subject to myriad external pressures which often have destabilising internal effects. The city’s traditional role as a maritime and commercial entrepôt and university city was widened to become a nascent financial centre in 1956 with the introduction of banking secrecy laws. Its subsequent international reputation as a diplomatic hub and tourist resort with various monikers such as the Switzerland or Paris of the Middle East coincided uneasily with growing geopolitical and migratory pressure flowing from the expulsion of Palestinians by Israel, and ended abruptly with the outbreak of civil war in 1975.

 

Periods of post-war reconstruction are the backdrop for new socio-economic and political dynamics. Reconstruction after the civil war had only limited success in achieving its ostensible aim of restoring the city’s former international status. Alongside the rise of centralised market-led urbanism, laissez-faire urban planning, the embedding of sectarian polarisation and neglect of basic infrastructure are all factors that raise questions about the model of urban regeneration implemented and arouse new socio-political tensions. Post-modern redevelopment of the inner-city as a site for speculative real-estate investment occurs alongside an intensive, unplanned urbanisation along the coastlines to the north and south, and in stark contrast to the ‘misery belt’ of informal sprawl on the periphery of the city. Recent crises not only comprise a long-standing concern about the state’s economic failure and clientelist political environment but were exacerbated by the outbreak of Covid-19 and also the 4th August blast in the port of Beirut. These events were seen by many as a crystallisation of Lebanon’s complex problems. However, these episodes do not supplant the rich historical setting both ancient and modern Lebanon represents for urban scholars. Beirut’s cultural and geographical liminality, and enduring role as a prominent urban confluence with multi-faceted geographic positionality, imbue it with an especially abundant empirical interest and topical relevance.


Instructions for Authors:
Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's instructions for authors and submit their abstracts (maximum of 250 words, with a tentative title) through the abstracts system (here). When submitting their abstracts, authors are also asked to confirm that they are aware that Urban Planning is an open access journal with a publishing fee if the article is accepted for publication after peer-review (corresponding authors affiliated with our institutional members do not incur this fee).


Open Access:
The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio's Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal's open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

♦♦♦

Volume 7, Issue 2

Title:
Gaming, Simulations and Planning: Physical and Digital Technologies for Public Participation in Urban Planning


Editor(s):
Andy Hudson-Smith (University College London) and Moozhan Shakeri (University of Twente)

Submission of Abstracts: 1-15 June 2021
Submission of Full Papers: 15-30 October 2021
Publication of the Issue: April/June 2022

Information:

Raser (1969), in his book on simulation gaming and society, conceptualized 'models' as 'toys' and argued for 'messing around' with artificial worlds as a legitimate way of knowing societies and planning for them. He wrote: "serious scholars approach serious, even crucial, problems by creating artificial worlds in a manner not entirely dissimilar to that of children playing house or building a space-ship out of cardboard cartons and chairs" (Raser, 1969, p. viii). Artificial worlds today have become highly complex. They collide via augmented and mixed reality into the physical spaces, mixing the real with the virtual. With worlds existing and manipulated within the computer, participatory creation and interaction with these artificial worlds have also evolved to become complex multi-user immersive experiences. Advanced computer graphics, along with new models of collaboration and participation continue to present notable potentials for urban planning. Running alongside physical urban models through to serious participatory games and diorama-like landscapes through to 'drag and drop' digital towns, Batty and Hudson-Smith (2001), the underlying premise remains the same; play, for the sake of knowledge creation around places and spaces. It is this mix of visualisation and play, either digital, physical or mixed reality that we argue is central to the future of public participation in planning.

The gaming approach to planning is not about the marching on of technology or the use of technology for technology's sake. It is about application and gaming as theory for urban planning. It is about practicing and learning to play the game and to listen to the outcomes and in doing so discovering the untapped potentials of Urban Planning in shaping the next era of Human to Computer and Human to Human Participation. Games, gaming technologies, and the gaming frame of mind have never disappeared from planning's practice and theory since they first appeared in urban planning's classrooms in the 1940s. Indeed, they have been influenced by and have influenced planning practices and theory for over 80 years (Raser, 1969; Duke & Greenblat, 1975; Light, 2008; Feldt, 2014; Tan, 2014; Dodig & Groat, 2019). Building upon this, this thematic issue seeks to explore the value of games beyond their value as a standalone technology to unravel the many ways in which games, gaming technologies, and game design practices have impacted the way we visualize and interact with cities, abstract and deal with the complexity of urban phenomena, and communicate future narratives. As such, we invite papers that address the following topics: game theory and urban planning, interactive narrative design and world-building, storytelling in planning, physical games and planning, game engines for urban visualisation, digital twins, and finally, urban modelling and simulation.

Batty M, Hudson-Smith A (2001), Virtuality and Cities: Definitions, Geographies, Designs, Taylor and Francis.Fisher PF, Unwin D, Taylor and Francis.

Dodig, M. B., & Groat, L. N. (Eds.). (2019). The Routledge Companion to Games in Architecture and Urban Planning: Tools for Design, Teaching, and Research. Routledge.

Duke, R. D., & Greenblat, C. S. (Eds.). (1975). Gaming-simulation: Rationale, Design, and Applications: a Text with Parallel Readings for Social Scientists, Educators, and Community Workers. Sage.

Feldt, A. G. (2014). Experience with simulation/gaming: 1960-2010. Simulation & Gaming, 45(3), 283-305.

Light, J. (2008). Taking games seriously. Technology and Culture, 49(2), 347-375.

Raser, J. R. (1969). Simulation and society: An exploration of scientific gaming. Allyn and Bacon, Inc.

Tan, E. (2014). Negotiation and design for the self-organizing city: Gaming as a method for urban design. TU Delft.


Instructions for Authors:
Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's instructions for authors and submit their abstracts (maximum of 250 words, with a tentative title) through the abstracts system (here). When submitting their abstracts, authors are also asked to confirm that they are aware that Urban Planning is an open access journal with a publishing fee if the article is accepted for publication after peer-review (corresponding authors affiliated with our institutional members do not incur this fee).


Open Access:
The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio's Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal's open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

♦♦♦

Volume 7, Issue 2

Title:
Zero Energy Renovation: How to Get Users Involved?


Editor(s):
Tineke van der Schoor (Hanze University of Applied Sciences, The Netherlands) and Fred Sanders (TU Delft, The Netherlands)

Submission of Abstracts: 1-15 June 2021
Submission of Full Papers: 15-30 October 2021
Publication of the Issue: April/June 2022

Information:
One of the most complex and urgent challenges in the energy transition is the large-scale refurbishment of the existing housing stock in the built environment. To bring CO2 emissions within limits, millions of existing houses in the EU need to undergo a radical energy retrofit. In order to comply with goals of the Paris convention, the aim is to live ‘energy-neutral’, that is, a dwelling should produce as much sustainable energy as it consumes on a yearly basis. Thus, all dwellings should be upgraded to nearly zero energy buildings (NZEB), which is a challenge to accomplish for a reasonable price. Across the EU, many projects have developed successful approaches to the improvement of building technologies and processes, as well a better involvement of citizens. It is important to compare and contrast such approaches and disseminate lessons learned. Furthermore, it is crucial to improve the level of participation of inhabitants in neighborhood renovation activities. Therefore, the central question of this issue is: How can we involve more tenants and owners into this radical energy renovation?

 

You are invited to send-in your abstract for this thematic issue, which will be focused on (near) zero-energy renovation in the social housing sector and mixed neighborhoods, including social, economic and psychological dimensions. Contributions on (but not limited to) the following issues are welcome:

  • Experiences and evaluations of users of near zero energy dwellings;
  • Evaluation of instruments for coaching users to achieve zero energy goals;
  • New strategies to ramp up the energy renovation rate, for example neighborhood-based approaches, involvement of new stakeholders, such as social workers;
  • Comparative case studies across EU-countries;
  • Successful business models for (near) zero energy-refurbishment for housing corporations;
  • Lessons learned regarding energy renovation in neighborhoods with mixed ownership.

Instructions for Authors:
Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal’s instructions for authors and submit their abstracts (maximum of 250 words, with a tentative title) through the abstracts system (here). When submitting their abstracts, authors are also asked to confirm that they are aware that Urban Planning is an open access journal with a publishing fee if the article is accepted for publication after peer-review (corresponding authors affiliated with our institutional members do not incur this fee).


Open Access:
The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio’s Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal’s open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

♦♦♦

Volume 7, Issue 2

Title:
From Smart Urban Forests to Edible Cities: New Approaches in Urban Planning and Design


Editor(s):
Alessio Russo (University of Gloucestershire, UK) and Francisco Escobedo (Pacific Southwest Research Station, USA)

Submission of Abstracts: 1-15 June 2021
Submission of Full Papers: 15-30 October 2021
Publication of the Issue: April/June 2022

Information:

The latest United Nations projection shows the world’s population could grow to 8.5 billion in the next ten years, reaching 10.9 billion in 2100. Furthermore, 70% of the world’s population will live in cities by 2030. As the urban population continues to grow, the twenty-first century is characterized by several challenges for sustainable urban development.  According to the UN Sustainable Development Goal 11, by 2030 we should “make cities inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable”. Several approaches that use green spaces, urban agriculture and vegetation such as nature-based solutions, forest cities, smart cities, biophilic cities, eco-urbanism, blue green cities, garden cities, etc. have been proposed to address complex societal challenges in cities. Thus, there is an urgent need to better understand cities as social-ecological systems. This thematic issue encourages submission of original, trans-disciplinary research in the areas of:

• Nature-based solutions in cities;

• Smart urban forests;

• Edible cities and green infrastructure;

• Water and energy-sensitive urban design;

• Rewilding cities and urban biodiversity;

• Environmental justice aspects of urban green spaces.


Instructions for Authors:
Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's instructions for authors and submit their abstracts (maximum of 250 words, with a tentative title) through the abstracts system (here). When submitting their abstracts, authors are also asked to confirm that they are aware that Urban Planning is an open access journal with a publishing fee if the article is accepted for publication after peer-review (corresponding authors affiliated with our institutional members do not incur this fee).


Open Access:
The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio's Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal's open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

♦♦♦

Volume 7, Issue 3

Title:
Co-Creation and the City: Arts-Based Methods and Participatory Approaches in Urban Planning


Editor(s):
Juliet Carpenter (Oxford University, UK) and Christina Horvath (University of Bath, UK)

Submission of Abstracts: 1-15 September 2021
Submission of Full Papers: 15-30 January 2022
Publication of the Issue: July/September 2022

Information:

Across the social sciences, there is growing awareness of the importance of understanding experiential and embodied ways of knowing, that go beyond conventional practices of objective knowledge generation. This is also the case in the discipline of urban planning, in particular in relation to participatory practices, with the need to move away from rational planning methodologies (Jupp and Inch, 2012; Inch, 2015), and embrace more affective and emotional perspectives on place that can emerge through creative practice (Sandercock and Attili, 2010). While participatory approaches can prompt thickened understandings of place and deeper community engagement in the planning process, in many cases they can also be co-opted by the powerholders.

There has been growing evidence, however, that applying arts-based methods within a communicative planning paradigm (Healey, 1996) at neighbourhood level can address some of the limitations involved in conventional approaches to planning. Recent experimentation with Co-Creation, in particular, has highlighted that arts-based methods were useful to produce situated and affective knowledges which in turn advanced more inclusive understandings of place that were essential to transcend conventional practices of consultation (Horvath and Carpenter, 2020).

While such art-based approaches have proven useful to complement conventional understandings of neighbourhood through their focus on previously unexplored issues as social connectedness, they also pose a number of methodological challenges. These involve finding adequate ways to develop arts-based approaches into reliable and broadly applicable methods that can contribute to planners' understandings of local knowledge production.

Another key challenge is linked with power imbalances inherent within the planning system in place, which need to be mitigated in order to move towards more inclusive and socially-just neighbourhoods. This thematic issue aims to explore how various arts-based approaches can be applied in urban planning. Papers will take a critical perspective on methodological approaches such as narrative story-telling, photovoice and photo-elicitation, performance-based methods, and participatory methods such as participatory video. They will examine how these methods can be applied to address asymmetries of power, barriers to engagement, comparing bottom-up initiatives to top-down approaches and challenging conventional ways of knowing in an urban planning context.


Instructions for Authors:
Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's instructions for authors and submit their abstracts (maximum of 250 words, with a tentative title) through the abstracts system (here). When submitting their abstracts, authors are also asked to confirm that they are aware that Urban Planning is an open access journal with a publishing fee if the article is accepted for publication after peer-review (corresponding authors affiliated with our institutional members do not incur this fee).


Open Access:
The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio's Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal's open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

♦♦♦

Volume 7, Issue 3

Title:
The Resilient Metropolis: Planning in an Era of Decentralization


Editor(s):
Thomas J. Vicino (Northeastern University, USA)

Submission of Abstracts: 1-15 September 2021
Submission of Full Papers: 15-30 January 2022
Publication of the Issue: July/September 2022

Information:
In response to recent transformations of the built environment, the economy, and society around the world, Urban Planning will publish a thematic issue on how planning processes and policy responses can adapt to the transformation of metropolitan areas in the pursuit of a more just and resilient society. The spatial decentralization of human settlements and economic activities is a key theme as patterns of metropolitan living continue to evolve and planning adapts as a response. These impacts are widespread, and three broad trends stand out. First, socio-spatial processes drive the uneven growth and development of cities and suburbs, thus exacerbating socioeconomic inequalities. Second, the economic globalization of cities and the pursuant human migration leads to further decentralization from the urban core to the metropolitan fringe. Finally, the COVID-19 pandemic has further disputed patterns of metropolitan decentralization. Questions abound about the future of cities and suburbs. Urban planners and policymakers will be faced with a multitude of challenges and opportunities as society charts the future for recovery from the pandemic.

 

A variety of articles would be welcomed on the social, economic, and political transformation of metropolitan areas—the city and their suburbs—in regions around the world. Submissions that span a variety of geographic scales and regions, including the Global North and the Global South, are especially welcomed. Authors may employ various approaches to research such as historical, normative, empirical, and comparative. Research related to areas of urban planning and public policy, such as community and economic development, demography, housing, transportation, regionalism, space and place, and social justice, is encouraged.

Authors are invited to submit an abstract (approximately 250 words) that describes the proposed article by 15 September 2021. Authors will be invited to submit a full manuscript by 30 January 2022. Articles in Urban Planning should not exceed 6,000 words in the initial submission of the manuscript. Upon revision, manuscripts should not exceed 8,000 words (refer to the journal’s guidelines). All submitted manuscripts will be reviewed following the journal’s standard double-blind, peer-review process. Please contact the academic editor, Prof Thomas Vicino (t.vicino@northeastern.edu), for additional information or questions regarding the content of your contribution. Regarding other queries (deadlines, instruction for authors, etc.), please contact Urban Planning directly (up@cogitatiopress.com).


Instructions for Authors:
Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's instructions for authors and submit their abstracts (maximum of 250 words, with a tentative title) through the abstracts system (here). When submitting their abstracts, authors are also asked to confirm that they are aware that Urban Planning is an open access journal with a publishing fee if the article is accepted for publication after peer-review (corresponding authors affiliated with our institutional members do not incur this fee).


Open Access:
The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio's Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal's open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

♦♦♦

Volume 7, Issue 3

Title:
Spatial Knowledge and Urban Planning


Editor(s):
Angela Million (TU Berlin), Anna Juliane Heinrich (TU Berlin) and Karsten Zimmermann (TU Dortmund)

Submission of Abstracts: 1-15 September 2021
Submission of Full Papers: 15-30 January 2022
Publication of the Issue: July/September 2022

Information:
This thematic issue is intended to address the changing significance of knowledge as a resource in planning and the growing complexity of negotiating between the different stocks of knowledge and validity claims of participating stakeholders within planning processes. Changes in planning culture have been discussed many times in recent decades, especially the turn towards participatory and cooperative forms of planning—the so-called communicative turn in planning—in the 1990s. More recently, the rise of the concept of co-production of knowledge has found increasing attention. However, while interests, logics and strategies of the many parties having a stake in planning processes have been analyzed, little attention has been paid to the knowledge claims they have and how this could inform planning, decision-making and materiality of implementations. In the face of increasingly complex stakeholder constellations in planning on the one hand and ever more available information (e.g., big data) on the other, planning processes can be re-read as processes of exchanging and negotiating knowledge claims, processing information and generating accepted spatial knowledge.

 Current interdisciplinary research suggests that different forms of knowledge production come into play and that subjective and objective knowledge stocks on space are more and more mediatized within modes of fast circulation due to digitalization. As different spatial knowledge stocks can be defined - such as planning-related expert knowledge, political knowledge, local knowledge, knowledge of lay persons, knowledge communities - questions arise about the legitimacy and the role of counter knowledge within the negotiation process of these different knowledge stocks in planning. The issue is aimed at exploring the diverse understandings of (spatial) knowledge, and how knowledge influences planning and how planning itself is a processes of knowledge generation. Interdisciplinary approaches to knowledge can enrich conceptual considerations on the use of knowledge in planning processes and thus contribute to a better understanding of planning processes and provide starting points for further theoretical planning considerations and planning practice. We invite papers addressing the following subjects:

- Theoretical reflections on negotiating knowledge claims in planning;

- The role of digitization of planning for spatial knowledge and its distribution;

- The role of indicators for valid knowledge production and evidence-based planning;

- Subjective spatial knowledge and its relevance for planning;

- Circulation of spatial knowledge;

- Informal production of knowledge;

- Policy expertise and the role of policy advice;

- Contested knowledge and conflict resolution.

Papers may address different dimensions and subjects of planning such as infrastructure planning, participation and conflict mediation, informal processes, urban design, or land use planning.


Instructions for Authors:
Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's instructions for authors and submit their abstracts (maximum of 250 words, with a tentative title) through the abstracts system (here). When submitting their abstracts, authors are also asked to confirm that they are aware that Urban Planning is an open access journal with a publishing fee if the article is accepted for publication after peer-review (corresponding authors affiliated with our institutional members do not incur this fee).


Open Access:
The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio's Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal's open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

♦♦♦

Volume 7, Issue 4

Title:
Vertical Cities: The Development of High-Rise Neighbourhoods


Editor(s):
Brian Webb (Cardiff University, UK) and James White (University of Glasgow, UK)

Submission of Abstracts: 1-15 December 2021
Submission of Full Papers: 15-30 April 2022
Publication of the Issue: October/December 2022

Information:
High-rise neighbourhoods, comprising clusters of multi-storey tower blocks, are now ubiquitous features in the urban landscape in many cities around the world. The planning and development of these vertical neighbourhoods is the result of numerous forces, including demographic change, migration, global flows of finance, sustainable policies that favour density and urban intensification, and changing real estate markets. Urban planners play a key role not only in facilitating the design and development of these new vertical neighbourhoods but also in addressing and managing the variegated impacts of these developments on the built environment and the residents that live in and around them.

The aim of this thematic issue is to critically explore how planning practice influences the design and development of high-rise neighbourhoods, ranging from the positive role planning plays as a shaper of the built environment as well as the culpability of planners in facilitating a form of development that is increasingly thought to exasperate inequalities, achieve poor environmental standards, and funnel public investment into emerging middle-class neighbourhoods.

Authors are encouraged to submit papers to this thematic issue on topics including but not limited to:

• Theoretical contributions that consider the intersection between planning practice and the wider dynamics of neighbourhood vertical urbanisation;

• The role of politics, public policy, and/or governance systems and the law in shaping high-rise neighbourhood planning outcomes;

• The design and morphology of high-rise neighbourhoods and the planning tools used to shape them;

• The future of vertical neighbourhoods given changing socio-economic trends;

• How planning decisions influence the lived experience of high-rise neighbourhoods;

• The interface between real estate markets, finance, and the planning of high-rise neighbourhoods;

• How different forms of high-rise housing tenure result in distinctive neighbourhood planning and design outcomes;

• The implications of the COVID-19 pandemic on existing and planned high-rise neighbourhoods.


Instructions for Authors:
Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's instructions for authors and submit their abstracts (maximum of 250 words, with a tentative title) through the abstracts system (here). When submitting their abstracts, authors are also asked to confirm that they are aware that Urban Planning is an open access journal with a publishing fee if the article is accepted for publication after peer-review (corresponding authors affiliated with our institutional members do not incur this fee).


Open Access:
The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio's Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal's open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

♦♦♦

Volume 7, Issue 4

Title:
Localizing Social Infrastructures: Welfare, Equity, and Community


Editor(s):
Lina Berglund-Snodgrass (Blekinge Institute of Technology, Sweden), Maria Fjellfeldt (Dalarna University, Sweden) and Ebba Högström (Blekinge Institute of Technology, Sweden)

Submission of Abstracts: 1-15 December 2021
Submission of Full Papers: 15-30 April 2022
Publication of the Issue: October/December 2022

Information:
Localizing social infrastructures (e.g., facilities for elder care, supported accommodations for people with disabilities, facilities for communal use such as community centres, libraries, youth clubs, playgrounds, sport and religious facilities etc.) in all its complexities of public expenditure, privatizations of public operations, market-led land-use planning, and segregation processes is challenging for contemporary welfare societies. The localizing of social infrastructure addresses the challenges connected to managing spatially differentiated socio-economic landscapes.

 

Traditionally, social infrastructures have been located in the midst of the urban (and rural) fabric, not seldom occupying prominent places, and seconded by high quality architecture. Social infrastructures have also played an important role in the development of the welfare state where they have been used as ‘tools’ in the overarching neighborhood planning paradigm for conveying democratic values and promoting social equity. Today, the landscape of welfare facilities appears as dispersed and somewhat elusive as new purpose-built schools may be located centrally in new urban developments or retrofitted in derelict industrial buildings in the outskirts of housing districts or located in generic office spaces – as one among many exchangeable tenants.

Localizing social infrastructure includes both spatial/geographical and administrative/legal considerations. It also involves a multitude of actors as well as the navigating different responsibilities, making localizing a complex matter of interactions and collaborations. This opens up questions such as: What social infrastructure is localized where and on what grounds? Which social inequalities and/or stigma will be brought to the fore by certain choices of locations? How will this affect citizen’s sense of belonging, identity and community? Localizing social infrastructure is a truly geographical endeavor closely connected to urban planning and social work.

This thematic issue seeks to chart the localizing of social infrastructures from an urban planning perspective and address the topic in a broad sense concerning questions such as i) the preconditions for localizing such facilities in the urban landscape, ii) the social consequences of the localizing of such facilities for individuals as well as, iii) for the long-term social sustainability of the wider community. We are interested in contributions that tackle localizing of social infrastructures in their historical, contemporary or future dimensions. We welcome proposals taking on board the ‘where’, ‘what’ and ‘why’ regarding this, and envision contributions from a multitude of theoretical perspectives and angles. Due to the multi-disciplinary aspects of this topic, we invite scholars from outside urban planning, e.g., social work, sociology, geography, political science and architecture.

References

Dear, M. (1978) Planning for Mental Health Care: A Reconsideration of Public Facility Location Theory.
International Regional Science Review 3(2), 93-111.

DeVerteuil, G. (2010) Reconsidering the legacy of urban public facility location theory in human
geography. Progress in Human Geography 24(1), 47–69.

Fjellfeldt, M., Berglund-Snodgrass, L., Högström, E., Markström, U., (forthcoming). Institutional fringes –
exploring location strategies of supported housing in a post-deinstitutional era. Social Inclusion.

Högström, E. (2018). 'It used to be here but moved somewhere else': Post-asylum spatialisations - a new
urban frontier? Social & Cultural Geography, 19(3).

Klinenberg, E. (2018). Palaces for the people-how social infrastructure can help fight inequality,
polarization, and the decline of civic life. New York, Crown Publishing Group.

Latham, A. & Layton, J. (2019) Social infrastructure and the public life of cities: studying urban sociality
and public spaces. Geography Compass, 13e12444.


Instructions for Authors:
Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's instructions for authors and submit their abstracts (maximum of 250 words, with a tentative title) through the abstracts system (here). When submitting their abstracts, authors are also asked to confirm that they are aware that Urban Planning is an open access journal with a publishing fee if the article is accepted for publication after peer-review (corresponding authors affiliated with our institutional members do not incur this fee).


Open Access:
The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio's Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal's open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

♦♦♦

Volume 7, Issue 4

Title:
Healthy Cities: Effective Urban Planning Approaches to a Changing World


Editor(s):
Elmira Jamei (Victoria University, Australia), Simona Azzali (James Cook University in Singapore, Singapore), Hendrik Tieben (The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong) and K Thirumaran (James Cook University in Singapore, Singapore)

Submission of Abstracts: 1-15 December 2021
Submission of Full Papers: 15-30 April 2022
Publication of the Issue: October/December 2022

Information:
The WHO Healthy Cities initiative was conceived with the goal of placing health as the top priority on the cities’ agenda, through promoting healthy urban planning, sustainable development and innovative multisectoral change. In fact, Healthy Cities is a strategic vehicle for health development and well-being in urban settings which puts people and communities at the heart of the urban planning process.

 

Given the rapid change in today’s world (population growth, natural hazards, climate change, and outbreak of new diseases), Healthy Cities has gained new attention and significant prominence in the context of the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals (particularly SDGs 3-11).

The aim of this thematic issue is to collect articles which aim at integrating health considerations into cities’ urban planning processes, programmes, and projects and establish the necessary capacity to achieve this goal. The articles will discuss how public spaces, neighbourhoods, and cities have an impact on physical, mental, and environmental health, and highlight the important role of urban planning in providing multiple health benefits to communities. This thematic issue welcomes original research articles and case studies that promote Healthy Cities initiative explicitly through urban planning and form a debate on how health is impacted by different sectors, projects, and policies by discussing necessary actions from different points of view.

We welcome contributions covering, but not limited to, the following topics:

  • Healthy Urban planning for ageing population;
  • Climate change impacts on health;
  • Urban Planning responses to Covid-19;
  • Protecting communities from natural hazards;
  • Disaster Management and Resilience through healthy urban planning;
  • Walkability and public health;
  • Capacity building and policy transfer for healthy cities;
  • Planning for well-being and mental health;
  • Blue-Green-Grey Infrastructure and Healthy Cities;
  • Healthy Cities and Sustainable Economy and Tourism;
  • People-Centered Cities.

Instructions for Authors:
Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's instructions for authors and submit their abstracts (maximum of 250 words, with a tentative title) through the abstracts system (here). When submitting their abstracts, authors are also asked to confirm that they are aware that Urban Planning is an open access journal with a publishing fee if the article is accepted for publication after peer-review (corresponding authors affiliated with our institutional members do not incur this fee).


Open Access:
The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio's Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal's open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

♦♦♦

Volume 8, Issue 1

Title:
Social Justice in the Green City


Editor(s):
Roberta Cucca (Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Norway) and Thomas Thaler (University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Austria)

Submission of Abstracts: 1-15 March 2022
Submission of Full Papers: 15-31 July 2022
Publication of the Issue: January/March 2023

Information:
While global urban development is increasingly oriented towards strategies for sustainability and green urbanism, both the ecological and equity implications of these developments are mostly overlooked. Access to urban public green and blue spaces is indeed unequally distributed in contemporary cities, and the COVID-19 lockdowns have shade light on the necessity of providing equal access to green urban spaces in order to guarantee a healthy sound living environment for all the inhabitants. Issues related to environmental justice and socio-spatial justice are increasing interviewed in contemporary cities, and call for a better understanding of the global and local mechanisms of production and reproduction of environmental and spatial inequalities. Indeed, the implementation of strategies to improve the quality and availability of the green and blue infrastructures may have unintended outcomes to the citizens, such as acting as a trigger for gentrification processes.

This results in demands for intersectional and relational approaches to justice in urban greening strategies and suggestions for a “just green enough” approach that do not lead to undesired social effects such as displacement or increase in housing costs.

In this framework, Urban Planning will publish a thematic issue on how planning processes and policy responses can alternatively act as mechanisms limiting or increasing new social and spatial green inequalities in contemporary cities. The thematic issue welcomes contributions on:

- Costs, benefits, and distributional consequences of various infrastructural options for urban greening;

- Theoretical reflections on new paradigms inspiring urban planning and renewal strategies in cities, such as “Just sustainability” and “Just green enough” approach;

- Strategic urban planning tools and policy processes taking into account distributional consequences;

- Methodological challenges and innovations in the study of social and environmental justice in the green city.

Authors are invited to submit an abstract (approximately 250 words) that describes the proposed article by 1-15 March 2022. Authors will be invited to submit a full manuscript by 15-31 July 2022. Articles in Urban Planning should not exceed 6,000 words in the initial submission of the manuscript. Upon revision, manuscripts should not exceed 8,000 words (refer to the journal’s guidelines). All submitted manuscripts will be reviewed following the journal’s standard double-blind peer-review process. Please contact the Academic Editors (Roberta Cucca, roberta.cucca@nmbu.no, and Thomas Thaler, thomas.thaler@boku.ac.at) for additional information or questions regarding the content of your contribution. Regarding other queries (deadlines, instructions for authors, etc.), please contact Urban Planning directly (up@cogitatiopress.com).


Instructions for Authors:
Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's instructions for authors and submit their abstracts (maximum of 250 words, with a tentative title) through the abstracts system (here). When submitting their abstracts, authors are also asked to confirm that they are aware that Urban Planning is an open access journal with a publishing fee if the article is accepted for publication after peer-review (corresponding authors affiliated with our institutional members do not incur this fee).


Open Access:
The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio's Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal's open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

♦♦♦

Volume 8, Issue 1

Title:
Urban Heritage and Patterns of Change: Spatial Practices of Physical and Non-Physical Transformation


Editor(s):
Frank Eckardt (Bauhaus-University Weimar, Germany) and Aliaa AlSadaty (Cairo University, Egypt)

Submission of Abstracts: 1-15 March 2022
Submission of Full Papers: 15-31 July 2022
Publication of the Issue: January/March 2023

Information:
Change is an important and essential part of life. In urban geographies, change involves any alteration in the urban environment, whether this alteration is associated with decline and decay or growth and prosperity of urban settings. The world is currently facing epochal changes that affect all aspects of life. Architectural and urban heritage are at the core of the process of change. The pace of urban change in heritage areas, however, differs widely across the world. In some areas, it is very slow due to heritage designation; in other parts it is an astonishingly rapid process with risk of erosion of heritage and urban areas of value. This could be due to rapid economic and demographic growth coupled with reluctance or absence of heritage protection laws. Nevertheless, change in heritage urban areas is not only confined to the physical aspects of change. Since urban spaces and settings are venues for human interactions and experiences, urban change is also widely affected by and affects non-physical aspects including socio-political practices, economic implications, and cultural impacts.

 

In this regard, this thematic issue looks at the various patterns of the interrelationship between heritage and urban change from both the physical and non-physical sides. Looking at the physical aspects of heritage and change includes but is not limited to investigations related with morphological transformation, post-disasters developments, infill interventions, urban growth and urbanization impacts, among others. Non-physical aspects of change also include, for instance, issues related to change of various races and classes within societies, positive and negative impacts of gentrification of historic urban areas, and the movement of populations, capitals, and goods and their impacts on historic and heritage urban areas.


Instructions for Authors:
Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's instructions for authors and submit their abstracts (maximum of 250 words, with a tentative title) through the abstracts system (here). When submitting their abstracts, authors are also asked to confirm that they are aware that Urban Planning is an open access journal with a publishing fee if the article is accepted for publication after peer-review (corresponding authors affiliated with our institutional members do not incur this fee).


Open Access:
The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio's Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal's open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

♦♦♦

Volume 8, Issue 1

Title:
Bombed Cities: Legacies of Post-War Planning on the Contemporary Urban and Social Fabric


Editor(s):
Seraphim Alvanides (Northumbria University, UK) and Carol Ludwig (GESIS Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences, Germany)

Submission of Abstracts: 15-31 October 2021
Submission of Full Papers: 15-31 July 2022
Publication of the Issue: January/March 2023

Information:
Post-Second World War reconstruction is now an important field of research around the world, with strands of enquiry investigating architecture, urban archaeology, heritage studies, urban design, city planning, critical cartography, and social geography. This thematic issue seeks to provide a critical statement on mid-twentieth century urban planning, starting from the period of the Second World War. The issue seeks to extend the accounts by Hohn (1993), Diefendorf (1993), and more recently Pendlebury et al. (2015), by examining how the early planning visions and decisions have been imprinted on today’s urban and social fabric of various bombed cities. We are looking for contributions that examine post-war reconstruction not only from the mainstream actualised perspective, but also considered by alternative visions and strategies—not only from Europe but also from other countries affected by the aftermath of the Second World War. The emphasis of the thematic issue is on empirically driven studies of post-catastrophic damage and reconstruction, actualised through qualitative, quantitative, mixed methodologies.

 

We encourage detailed studies of early post-war cities demonstrating how urban planning practices recorded destruction and subsequently reshaped and reimagined historic city centres and their surroundings. Contributions on (but not limited to) the following themes are welcome:

  • Alternative visions and strategies of post-war city reconstruction and their realisation;
  • Legacies of post-war urban transformation—successes and failures;
  • Longitudinal analysis of the implications of destruction/urban transformation on cities today (social, economic, environmental, etc.);
  • Theoretical reflections on post-war urban planning;
  • Comparative case studies of cities within/between countries and continents;
  • The use of innovative methodologies, in particular spatial digital humanities methods.

References:

Diefendorf J. 1993. In the wake of war: The reconstruction of German cities after World War II. Oxford University Press.

Hohn U. 1993. Die Zerstörung deutscher Städte 1940 bis 1945: Luftkrieg und Stadtplanung, Schadenserfassung und Schadensbilanz , in: Kriegszerstörung und Wiederaufbau deutscher Städte, Eds.: Josef Nipper / Manfred Nutz, Köln, 1993, S. 3-24.

Pendlebury J., Erten E. & Larkham P. 2015. Alternative visions of post-war reconstruction. Routledge.


Instructions for Authors:
Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's instructions for authors and submit their abstracts (maximum of 250 words, with a tentative title) through the abstracts system (here). When submitting their abstracts, authors are also asked to confirm that they are aware that Urban Planning is an open access journal with a publishing fee if the article is accepted for publication after peer-review (corresponding authors affiliated with our institutional members do not incur this fee).


Open Access:
The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio's Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal's open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

♦♦♦

Volume 8, Issue 2

Title:
Smart Engagement with Citizens: Integrating “the Smart” into Inclusive Public Participation and Community Planning


Editor(s):
Jin-Kyu Jung (University of Washington, USA) and Jung Eun Kang (Pusan National University, South Korea)

Submission of Abstracts: 1-15 June 2022
Submission of Full Papers: 15-30 October 2022
Publication of the Issue: April/June 2023

Information:
The discourse of the smart city epitomizes a new paradigm shift in urban planning and cities. Smart cities require and are powered by smart city principles to succeed, including smart technologies, infrastructure, and governance; however, they also need to engage closely with the citizens in embracing the diverse perspectives, experiences, and opportunities of living in smart cities—smart engagement. Creative engagements/encounters with the ordinary citizens are essential for unbinding possibilities of creating inclusive smart communities that enhance citizen participation, provide meaningful educated information, advocate for greater equity in public policies, and ultimately empower citizens (Coe et al., 2001; Harvey, 2000; Visvizi & Lytras, 2019; Zukin, 1995).

 

The smart city discourses focus on a techno-centered digital solution to urban problems/issues, to make cities more responsive, efficient, sustainable, and intelligent. It considers the use of technical or technological infrastructures and interventions as a means to ensure optimum efficiency with regards to urban planning and sustainable development (Goodman et al., 2020; Hollands, 2008; Roche, 2014). Smart cities can be also built based more on collaborative democratic approaches in which cities provide access to data and allow citizens to be part of urban innovation processes, thus building city governance through open and participatory people-centric approaches (Cardullo & Kitchin, 2019; Helgason, 2002; Lee & Lee, 2014; O’Grady & O’Hare, 2012). Community engagement and citizen participation are not exclusive to smart cities and smart city planning (Arnstein, 1967; Innes & Booher, 2004; Staeheli, 2005); however, smart cities have shed a new light on these concepts and practices by providing new means to enable inclusive public citizen participation in urban and community planning process. There is a potential for smart engagement to represent the kind of direct democracy and participatory planning that define a vibrant civil society, with citizens engaged as active participants in the inclusive planning process with the ability to connect humans through physical, digital, online, and hybrid engagement.

This thematic issue invites scholars who are interested in a variety of new visions, facets and methods, practices, and tools for enabling smart engagements, in which smart technologies, infrastructure and governance, and inclusive planning processes all together foster social inclusion, democratization, communications, and engagements with the citizens. These bind the prospect of smart communities in which citizens are actively involved in the design of smart cities as users/consumers, as well as participants and co-producers. Case studies from inter- and trans-national perspectives to better examine the extent of citizen participation and engagement in smart cities are encouraged.

Authors are invited to address any of the following topics (but not limited to):

  • Collaborative democracy and citizen participation in smart cities;
  • Inequality, justice, and social and digital division in smart city planning;
  • Community-based climate change planning with “the smart”;
  • Smart engagement and community platforms;
  • Smart engagement for urban regeneration;
  • Assessment and evaluation of smart engagement.

References:

Arnstein, S. R. (1967). A ladder of citizen participation. Journal of American Planning Association, 35(4), 216-224.

Cardullo, P., & Kitchin, R. (2019). Being a ‘citizen’ in the smart city: Up and down the scaffold of smart citizen participation in Dublin, Ireland. GeoJournal. 84(1), 1-13.

Coe, A., Paquet, G., & Roy, J. (2001). E-governance and smart communities: A social learning challenge. Social Science Computer Review, 19(1), 80-93.

Goodman, N., Zwick, A., Spicer, Z., & Carlsen, N. (2020). Public engagement in smart city development: Lessons from communities in Canada's smart city challenge. The Canadian Geographer, 64(3), 416-432.

Harvey, D. (2000). Spaces of hope. Edinburgh University Press.

Helgason, W. (2002, November 15). Inclusion through a digital lens [Paper presentation]. Thinking Smart Cities, Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada.

Hollands, R. G. (2008). Will the real smart city please stand up? City: Analysis of Urban Trends, Culture, Theory, Policy, Action, 12(3), 303-320.

Innes, J. E., & Booher, D. E. (2004). Reframing public participation: Strategies for the 21st century. Planning Theory & Practice, 5(4), 419-436.

Lee, J., & Lee, H. (2014). Developing and validating a citizen-centric typology for smart city service. Government Information Quarterly, 31(1), S93-S105.

O'Grady, M., & O'Hare, G. (2012). How smart is your city? Science, 335, 1581-1582.

Roche, S. (2014). Geographic Information Science I: Why does a smart city need to be spatially enabled? Progress in Human Geography, 38(5), 703-711.

Staeheli, L. A. (2005). Can American cities be sites of citizenship? What can we do about it? Urban Geography, 26(3), 197-199.

Visvizi, A., & Lytras, M. D. (2019). Smart cities: Issues and challenges. Elsevier.

Zukin, S. (1995). The culture of cities. Blackwell.


Instructions for Authors:
Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's instructions for authors and submit their abstracts (maximum of 250 words, with a tentative title) through the abstracts system (here). When submitting their abstracts, authors are also asked to confirm that they are aware that Urban Planning is an open access journal with a publishing fee if the article is accepted for publication after peer-review (corresponding authors affiliated with our institutional members do not incur this fee).


Open Access:
The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio's Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal's open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

♦♦♦

Volume 8, Issue 2

Title:
Planning around Polarization


Editor(s):
Oswald Devisch (Hasselt University, Belgium), Liesbeth Huybrechts (Hasselt University, Belgium), Anna Seravalli (Malmö University, Sweden) and Seppe De Blust (ETH Zürich, Switzerland)

Submission of Abstracts: 1-15 June 2022
Submission of Full Papers: 15-30 October 2022
Publication of the Issue: April/June 2023

Information:
Spatial transformation processes illuminate latent conflicts over ownership, externalities, priorities, among others. Thinking about and deciding on future uses and imaginaries confronts people with the inequalities and systemic constraints that shape the reality they live in. Over the last decades, scholars have been pointing out how banal planning quarrels increasingly get caught in polarized discussions touching on more fundamental differences and worldviews. If it is the role of urban planners to make these conflicts productive, it becomes highly important to explore how our working methods engage with these more ontological discussions.

 

Collins and Raymond (2006), for instance, propose to not only see (participatory) planning as a matter of providing all participants with the possibility of “having a say” but also as an opportunity to bring different forms of knowledge together to learn together about a specific issue (Pretty 1995; Collins and Raymond 2006). To trigger this learning, Whatmore (2009) proposes to build ‘competency groups’ around opposing collectives in order to deconstruct their ‘knowledge controversies’. Podziba (2012), in turn, invites us to shift our focus from working towards shared values to learning to respect opposing value frameworks. Torfing et al. (2020) illustrate how competing governance paradigms co-exist in all public organizations and provide clues on how planners can navigate in highly conflictual contexts.

With this thematic issue, we want to draw lessons from these recent experiences in planning around polarization. We are interested in frameworks and cases that describe attempts to reorder how we perceive, think, act, and engage with our own self and the object of planning as living systems; how we can organize and engage with conflicts by introducing non-dualistic viewpoints and processes that blur the disjuncture between rational theory and social practice; and how we can rethink the instruments of planning to fundamentally engage with its relational nature.

 

References:

Collins, K. & Raymond, I. (2006). Dare we jump off Arnstein’s ladder? Social learning as a new policy paradigm. In: Proceedings of PATH (Participatory Approaches in Science & Technology) Conference, 4-7 June 2006, Edinburgh.

Podziba, S. L. (2012). Civic Fusion: Mediating Polarized Public Disputes. American Bar Association.

Torfing, J., Andersen, L. B., Greve, C. & Klausen, K. K. (2020). Public governance paradigms: Competing and co-existing. Edward Elgar Publishing.

Whatmore, S. (2009), Mapping knowledge controversies: science, democracy and the redistribution of expertise, Progress in Human Geography, 33: 587–98.


Instructions for Authors:
Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's instructions for authors and submit their abstracts (maximum of 250 words, with a tentative title) through the abstracts system (here). When submitting their abstracts, authors are also asked to confirm that they are aware that Urban Planning is an open access journal with a publishing fee if the article is accepted for publication after peer-review (corresponding authors affiliated with our institutional members do not incur this fee).


Open Access:
The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio's Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal's open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

♦♦♦

Volume 8, Issue 2

Title:
Queer(ing) Urban Planning and Municipal Governance


Editor(s):
Alison L. Bain (York University, Canada) and Julie A. Podmore (John Abbott College, Canada)

Submission of Abstracts: 1-15 June 2022
Submission of Full Papers: 15-31 October 2022
Publication of the Issue: April/June 2023

Information:
Despite a decade of research, LGBTQ+ urban planning issues have yet to be ‘mainstreamed’ and evenly integrated into the everyday work of municipal governance. Through theoretical reflection and methodological innovation, this thematic issue critically scales up the existing LGBTQ+ urban planning scholarship from neighbourhoods to city-regions and empirically extends research frameworks to surface the messy materialities of municipal governance for sexual and gender non-normative subjects. Building on a legacy of queer scholarship that questions urban planning’s heteronormative assumptions and addresses the need for inclusive queer spaces, the thematic issue continues the investigation into LGBTQ2S spaces, but specifically extends the scope of the discussion historically, geographically, and thematically. It engages with plans and policies that address LGBTQ+ needs for infrastructure provision, social services and community facilities access, housing and economic development, community-event financing, public safety, social inclusion, and civic participation. Critical interdisciplinary engagement will be organized under three key themes and subthemes:

 

 

 

 

 

1. Socio-spatial regulation

a) The role of past and present bylaws, licenses, zoning, and plans in regulating LGBTQ+ lives in cities and suburbs.

b) The impacts of normative constructions of families, gender, and sexuality on community development plans and housing policies.

c) The (re)production of LGBTQ+ exclusions in public spaces through urban redevelopment priorities and/or policing strategies.

2. Queering plans and policies

a) The place of LGBTQ+ knowledge, networks, and lived experiences in social inclusion policies and community plans shaped by municipal agendas for creative, livable, digital, and sustainable cities.

b) The extent to which queer and transgender competencies inform municipal urban planning and policymaking.

c) The conflicts, impediments, and contradictions found in municipal urban planning and policymaking responses to queering planning.

3. Governance coalitions and activisms

a) The role of LGBTQ+ activists in reworking and resisting municipal logics to build community resilience.

b) Instances when LGBTQ+-inclusivity exceeds social planning to engage with an (in)visibility politics that may impact upon the tangible materialities of infrastructure.

c) The tensions, disconnects, and misrecognitions generated through the integration of LGBTQ+ and QTBIPOC activists into local participatory urban planning processes and planning discourses.


Instructions for Authors:
Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's instructions for authors and submit their abstracts (maximum of 250 words, with a tentative title) through the abstracts system (here). When submitting their abstracts, authors are also asked to confirm that they are aware that Urban Planning is an open access journal with a publishing fee if the article is accepted for publication after peer-review (corresponding authors affiliated with our institutional members do not incur this fee).


Open Access:
The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio's Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal's open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

♦♦♦

Volume 8, Issue 3

Title:
Assessing the Complex Contributions of Christopher Alexander


Editor(s):
Michael W. Mehaffy (Sustasis Foundation, USA) and Tigran Haas (KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden)

Submission of Abstracts: 1-15 September 2022
Submission of Full Papers: 15-31 January 2023
Publication of the Issue: July/September 2023

Information:
Christopher Alexander’s career, which began at Walter Gropius’ Harvard in the late 1950s and spans well into the 21st century, serves as both a chronicle of the key issues and critiques of the last half-century of planning and design, and undeniably, a seminal contribution to it. From Notes on the Synthesis of Form, his first book and Harvard Ph.D. thesis, to the landmark “A City is Not a Tree,” to the best-sellers A Pattern Language and The Timeless Way of Building, to his more difficult and controversial magnum opus, The Nature of Order, Alexander has left a body of work whose breadth and depth is only now coming into view. Yet Alexander’s legacy is also the subject of intense debate and critique within the planning and design fields. The purpose of this thematic issue, then, is to provide greater clarity on where Alexander’s contribution is substantial, and where there are documented gaps and remaining challenges. Most importantly, the thematic issue aims to identify fruitful avenues for further research and development, taking forward some of the more promising but undeveloped insights of this seminal 20th-century thinker.


Instructions for Authors:
Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's instructions for authors and submit their abstracts (maximum of 250 words, with a tentative title) through the abstracts system (here). When submitting their abstracts, authors are also asked to confirm that they are aware that Urban Planning is an open access journal with a publishing fee if the article is accepted for publication after peer-review (corresponding authors affiliated with our institutional members do not incur this fee).


Open Access:
The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio's Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal's open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

♦♦♦

Volume 8, Issue 3

Title:
Car Dependency and Urban Form


Editor(s):
Kobe Boussauw (Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Belgium), Koos Fransen (Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Belgium / Ghent University, Belgium) and Enrica Papa (University of Westminster, UK)

Submission of Abstracts: 1-15 June 2022
Submission of Full Papers: 15-31 October 2022
Publication of the Issue: July 2023

Information:
The degree to which urban societies have become car dependent has been a rewarding research topic for decades. In 1989, Newman and Kenworthy (1989) developed a line of research in which car dependency was initially related to urban form. Although their work quickly became very influential in the field of spatial planning, their research design has become subject to methodological criticism, while their notion of car dependency has been found too narrow. Later research proposed an alternative conceptualisation of car dependency and stressed the importance of differentiating between car-dependent people and car-dependent trips (Goodwin, 1995). More recent publications distinguish between three different understandings of car dependency: micro (car dependency as an attribute of individuals), meso (as an attribute of particular trips, activities or practices), and macro (as an attribute of society) (Mattioli et al., 2016). Moreover, there is growing consensus that car dependency is a problem that is intertwined with all facets of society and therefore cannot simply be reduced to a characteristic of urban form. Nonetheless, the question of the impact of urban form on car dependency remains a hot topic among spatial planners and mobility planners. We therefore launch a call for scholarly contributions that take a contemporary look at the problem of car dependency and urban form, both in the global North and in the global South, based on a genuine concern about how we can shape future urbanisation and urban redevelopment in a less car-oriented manner.

Contributions can focus on, but are not limited to, the following topics:

 - Determinants of actual, perceived, and subjective car dependency in urban settings: importance of design of public space, walkability, bikeability, or transit-oriented development;

- Forced car ownership, forced long-distance commuting, and car-dependent passengers;

- Mobility induced social exclusion, transport disadvantage, and car dependency;

- Urban form, society, and culture;

- Travel behaviour, residential self-selection, and mode choice;

- Sustainable urban planning and policy in relation to reducing car dependency;

- Spatial and socio-demographic variations of car dependency;

- Direct and indirect costs of car-dependent built environments.

 

References:

- Goodwin, P. (1995). Car dependence. Transport Policy, 2(3), 151–152.

- Mattioli, G., Anable, J., & Vrotsou, K. (2016). Car dependent practices: Findings from a sequence pattern mining study of UK time use data. Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, 89, 56–72.

- Newman, P., & Kenworthy, J. (1989). Cities and automobile dependence: An international sourcebook. Gower.


Instructions for Authors:
Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's instructions for authors and submit their abstracts (maximum of 250 words, with a tentative title) through the abstracts system (here). When submitting their abstracts, authors are also asked to confirm that they are aware that Urban Planning is an open access journal with a publishing fee if the article is accepted for publication after peer-review (corresponding authors affiliated with our institutional members do not incur this fee).


Open Access:
The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio's Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal's open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

♦♦♦

Volume 8, Issue 3

Title:
Shipping Canals in Transition: Rethinking Spatial, Economic, and Environmental Dimensions From Sea to Hinterland


Editor(s):
Carola Hein (Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands), Sabine Luning (Leiden University, The Netherlands), Han Meyer (Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands) and Paul van de Laar (Erasmus University of Technology, The Netherlands)

Submission of Abstracts: 1-15 September 2022
Submission of Full Papers: 15-31 January 2023
Publication of the Issue: July/September 2023

Information:
Shipping canals have been at the heart of economic and spatial restructuring for many centuries; they are hubs for political claims, economic development, ecological rethinking of urban deltas, port city territories and the water-land intersection. Shipping canals are an excellent object for the study of extended urbanization and current reflections on infrastructure as socio-culture objects. The New Waterway in the Netherlands, created in the 19th century, served as a catalyst for a fundamental transition: it led to the explosive growth of the port and city of Rotterdam and was accompanied by a structural change in the river drainage system and of the nature in and around the estuary, including the development of the industrial port complex Botlek-Europoort-Maasvlakte in the mid-20th century. The Maas estuary changed from an estuary to an industrial port canal that must be dredged annually. Today, new fundamental transitions are needed, raising the question whether this and other shipping canals globally can act as a motor transitions: in the field of water management and flood protection, in the field of biodiversity, the restoration of the ecosystem in the estuary, in the field of energy transition in the industrial port complex and in light of heritage structures, and in the field of the regional spatial structure and strong 'green-blue' structures. This thematic issue calls for contributions that consider the regional, economic, global logistical, natural dimensions of international shipping canals such as the New Waterway, the Suez and Panama canals, the Rhine-Main-Danube Canal, the Erie Canal, or the Houston ship channel. The thematic issue invites participants to (re)think the values that drive (water)engineering, economies of scale, political and legal instruments that have allowed for the construction—land ownership, expropriation, or land use—and maintenance of the canals as well as their future as part of nature-culture ecosystems.


Instructions for Authors:
Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's instructions for authors and submit their abstracts (maximum of 250 words, with a tentative title) through the abstracts system (here). When submitting their abstracts, authors are also asked to confirm that they are aware that Urban Planning is an open access journal with a publishing fee if the article is accepted for publication after peer-review (corresponding authors affiliated with our institutional members do not incur this fee).


Open Access:
The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio's Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal's open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

♦♦♦

Volume 8, Issue 4

Title:
Between the “Structural” and the “Everyday”: Bridging Macro and Micro Perspectives in Comparative Urban Research


Editor(s):
Sophie Schramm (TU Dortmund, Germany) and Nadine Appelhans (TU Berlin, Germany)

Submission of Abstracts: 1-15 December 2022
Submission of Full Papers: 15-30 April 2023
Publication of the Issue: October/December 2023

Information:
For informed decision-making, cities can gain from understanding their position within a larger network of cities. For a long time, however, comparison in urban studies (such as the world city hypothesis or the global city discussion) focused on comparison of global economic performance and failed to include a large number of cities as subjects of comparison, that did not comply with the limited scope of comparative criteria. These limited scopes of comparative criteria have been criticized, yet it remains somewhat unclear how they can be overcome methodologically and made inclusive to the full global scope of cities and themes of comparison. This is mostly due to the fact that different approaches exist in urban research that are often framed as opposed to each other or even mutually exclusive. One is the approach to study cities from a macro-perspective, to examine the broader structures, be they economic forces, technological innovations, or social changes as explanatory factors for the evolution of cities and regions. This approach lends itself for comparative research as it identifies broader trends that might have similar impacts in different places. Another approach to understanding cities is to study them from the bottom-up, focusing on everyday experiences and practices of actors in shaping urban life and form. Related methods lend themselves to understand the particular, place-specific characteristics that make every city unique.

 

 

We consider cities as complex relational entities that are shaped by an interplay between broader structural configurations and dynamics and local practices and activities (cf. Kihato, 2013). We therefore argue that approaches with a focus on structural dynamics and everyday practices can not only be merged but they should also be combined for a better understanding of cities. However, this combination of perspectives poses methodological challenges, particularly in terms of research comparing cities, as the description of the internal interplay needs to be abstract without losing the specificities. Our aim for this thematic issue is to accept this challenge and to discuss methods that bridge the divide between approaches focusing on the “structural” on the one hand and the “everyday” on the other, while being able to place individual urban accounts within the larger realm of city-systems.

We invite contributions focusing on one or more of the following questions:

  1. Which particular methods, sets of methods, and research designs lend themselves to understanding cities through everyday practices as well as structural forces?
  2. Which methods allow comparative urban research that pays attention to the common trends as well as to the particularities of cities?
  3. What are suggestions for expanding criteria of urban comparison and proposals for heterodox descriptions of city-networks?

References:

Appelhans, N. (2017). Urban planning and everyday urbanisation: A case study of Bahir Dar, Ethiopia. Transcript.

Healey, P. (2012). The universal and the contingent: Some reflections on the transnational flow of planning ideas and practices. Planning Theory, 11(2), 188–207.

Kihato, C. W. (2013). Migrant women of Johannesburg: Everyday life in an in-between city. Palgrave Macmillan.

Nijman, J. (2007). Introduction: Comparative urbanism. Urban Geography, 28(1), 1–6.

Robinson, J. (2011). Cities in a world of cities: The comparative gesture. International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, 35(1), 1–23.

Schramm, S., & Ibrahim, B. (2019). Hacking the pipes: Hydro-political currents in a Nairobi housing estate. Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space, 39(2), 354-370.


Instructions for Authors:
Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's instructions for authors and submit their abstracts (maximum of 250 words, with a tentative title) through the abstracts system (here). When submitting their abstracts, authors are also asked to confirm that they are aware that Urban Planning is an open access journal with a publishing fee if the article is accepted for publication after peer-review (corresponding authors affiliated with our institutional members do not incur this fee).


Open Access:
The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio's Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal's open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

♦♦♦

Volume 8, Issue 4

Title:
Conspicuous Production for Green Cities


Editor(s):
Yonn Dierwechter (University of Washington, USA) and Mark Pendras (University of Washington, USA)

Submission of Abstracts: 1-15 December 2022
Submission of Full Papers: 15-30 April 2023
Publication of the Issue: October/December 2023

Information:

In the post-industrial world of urban redevelopment, manufacturing and other industrial activities have typically been relegated to the urban margins, if not ‘offshored’ entirely in the now familiar global divisions of labour. Pushed out of sight and out of mind by modernist zoning practices designed to protect more privileged land uses, the contributions of manufacturing to urban vitality have, until recently, been forgotten and/or overlooked by planners and development practitioners seeking to cash in on post-industrial momentum. However, this is now changing (e.g., Ferm et al, 2020; Nawratek, 2017). New examples of ‘conspicuous production’ (Baker, 2017) signal a potential turning of the tide. Following Karl Baker’s (2017) original suggestion, making production conspicuous means weaving manufacturing back into the fabric of the city, bringing visibility and proximity to the sector in ways that open space for engagement, attention, and support. Within this policy context and spatial reorientation, this issue looks thematically at planning for, with, and/or through manufacturing as a critical new form of green urbanism, building on and extending ideas advanced recently in this journal by authors in “Future Commercial and Industrial Areas” (Vol. 6, No. 3, 2021) as well as by the two guest editors organized under the theme of “keeping blue collars in green cities” (see, e.g., Dierwechter, 2013, 2021; Dierwechter & Pendras, 2020; Pendras & Williams, 2021). In addition to asking how to make urban-based manufacturing greener, this thematic issue specifically explores how emerging efforts to retain (and expand) manufacturing in so-called ‘post-industrial societies’ are now helping cities and city-regions to be greener and more climate friendly by situating production not as a problem to be overcome but rather as an important component of urban sustainability. The papers collectively will explore how planning systems in different settings are both adapting to and accelerating this possibility.

References:

Baker, K. (2017). Conspicuous production: Valuing the visibility of industry in urban re-industrialisation. In K. Nawratek (Ed.), Urban re-industrialization (pp. 117-126). Punctum Books.

Dierwechter, Y. (2013). Smart city-regionalism across Seattle: Progressing transit nodes in labor space? Geoforum, 49(0), 139-149.

Dierwechter, Y. (2021). Climate change and the future of Seattle. Anthem.

Dierwechter, Y., & Pendras, M. (2020). Keeping blue collars in green cities: From TOD to TOM? Frontiers in Sustainable Cities, 2(7).

Ferm, J., Panayotopoulos-Tsiros, D., & Griffiths, S. (2021). Planning urban manufacturing, industrial building typologies, and built environments: Lessons from Inner London. Urban Planning, 6(3), 350-367.

Nawratek, K. (Ed.). (2017). Urban re-industrialization. Punctum Books.

Pendras, M., & Williams, C. (2020). Secondary cities: Exploring uneven development in dynamic urban regions of the Global North. Bristol University Press.


Instructions for Authors:
Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's instructions for authors and submit their abstracts (maximum of 250 words, with a tentative title) through the abstracts system (here). When submitting their abstracts, authors are also asked to confirm that they are aware that Urban Planning is an open access journal with a publishing fee if the article is accepted for publication after peer-review (corresponding authors affiliated with our institutional members do not incur this fee).


Open Access:
The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio's Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal's open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

♦♦♦

Volume 8, Issue 4

Title:
Improvisation, Conviviality, and Conflict in Everyday Encounters in Public Space


Editor(s):
Mervyn Horgan (University of Guelph, Canada) and Saara Liinamaa (University of Guelph, Canada)

Submission of Abstracts: 1-15 March 2022
Submission of Full Papers: 15-31 October 2022
Publication of the Issue: October 2023

Information:

Existing research on encounters in urban spaces treats seriously everyday experiences, improvisations, and negotiations between strangers, where identities are produced, affirmed, and/or negated, and where differences are highlighted, assumed, and/or ignored. Recently there has been an explosion of (mostly Western-focused) research on conviviality in everyday urban life (Germain, 2013; Radice, 2016; Vigneswaran, 2014; Wise & Velayutham, 2009, 2014). This ‘convivial turn’ (Neal et al., 2013) is inspired by Gilroy’s (2005, p. xv) positioning of conviviality as centrally concerned with “processes of cohabitation and interaction that have made multiculture an ordinary feature of social life.” Convivialities research provides insights into everyday collective life, with many studies providing a valuable counterweight to the ‘vast sociology of hopelessness’ (Hall & Smith 2014). Make no mistake, though, this is no panacea. Simultaneously, research attunes us to the bubbling up of new forms of conflict, and the consolidation of old forms of marginalization. As Back and Sinha (2016, p. 517) note, we must attend to the “paradoxical co-existence of both racism and conviviality in city life.”

For this thematic issue, we invite papers that explore varieties of co-existence amongst strangers expressed in and through everyday encounters—improvised, convivial, conflictual, or otherwise—in urban public spaces. We welcome research that takes seriously the challenge of treating everyday public space as a domain where strangers encounter one another. Contributions work with and/or against the convivial turn, whether to identify and address, expose and challenge, and/or expand and surpass its limits and possibilities. We especially welcome research working at the conceptual boundaries of the convivial turn in one or more of the following ways: (1) by elaborating concepts/cases that make trouble for research on conviviality in urban public space; (2) by examining how urban public spaces facilitate or hinder improvisation in interactions between strangers; and (3) by engaging with potentially overlooked intersections between conviviality and adjacent concepts including but not limited to sociability, (in)civility, interdependence, solidarity, reciprocity, mutuality, and superdiversity.


Instructions for Authors:
Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's instructions for authors and submit their abstracts (maximum of 250 words, with a tentative title) through the abstracts system (here). When submitting their abstracts, authors are also asked to confirm that they are aware that Urban Planning is an open access journal with a publishing fee if the article is accepted for publication after peer-review (corresponding authors affiliated with our institutional members do not incur this fee).


Open Access:
The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio's Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal's open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

♦♦♦

Volume 9, Issue 1

Title:
Urban Borderlands: Difference, Inequality, and Spatio-Temporal In-Betweenness in Cities


Editor(s):
Deljana Iossifova (University of Manchester, UK) and David Kostenwein (ETH Zurich, Switzerland)

Submission of Abstracts: 15-30 September 2022
Submission of Full Papers: 15-31 March 2023
Publication of the Issue: January/March 2024

Information:

Cities in the Global North and South are marked by rapid socio-spatial transformation stemming from socioeconomic, environmental, and cultural transitions. The result is often socio-spatial fragmentation, frequently produced by the processes of urban planning and governance. In this thematic issue, contributions are concerned with the nature of planned urban borderlands as spaces of spatio-temporal in-betweenness signifying difference and inequality.

We understand difference across and inclusive of its multiple and intersecting domains, among them species, class, caste, race, gender, age, socio-economic status, ethnicity, or religion. Similarly, we embrace definitions of inequality along the lines of, for instance, spatial, social, economic, educational, or infrastructural. We are particularly interested in the spaces of spatio-temporal in-betweenness (urban borderlands; Iossifova, 2015) that the convergence of difference and inequality produces. These are the physical spaces in-between differently characterized fragments of the city that may exist only for a short time as the city ‘develops’ and transforms, or the physical spaces in-between such fragments that remain permanently to remind us of the differences that produced them.

We are interested in the production of such borderlands, and particularly in the role that architectural, planning, or governance practices play in the (re)production of these spaces across time and space. We also invite contributions that discuss—even suggest—alternatives to the usually crippling effect of such spaces on human health and wellbeing as well as socio-ecological sustainability. We invite contributions from across the spectrum of disciplinary fields and/or professional practice.


Instructions for Authors:
Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's instructions for authors and submit their abstracts (maximum of 250 words, with a tentative title) through the abstracts system (here). When submitting their abstracts, authors are also asked to confirm that they are aware that Urban Planning is an open access journal with a publishing fee if the article is accepted for publication after peer-review (corresponding authors affiliated with our institutional members do not incur this fee).


Open Access:
The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio's Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal's open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

♦♦♦

Volume 9, Issue 1

Title:
Co-Production in the Urban Setting: Fostering Definitional and Conceptual Clarity Through Comparative Research


Editor(s):
Dahae Lee (TU Dortmund, Germany), Robin Chang (RWTH Aachen University, Germany), Patricia Feiertag (TU Dortmund, Germany) and Lena Unger (TU Dortmund, Germany)

Submission of Abstracts: 1-15 January 2023
Submission of Full Papers: 15-31 May 2023
Publication of the Issue: January/March 2024

Information:

Cities change and face various challenges that are increasingly complex, intractable, persistent, and not amenable to simple solutions. What is more, when governments prove to be incapable of being the only possible supplier of public goods and services, collaborative forms of public service delivery gain significance. This phenomenon is known as co-production and refers to the collaboration between service professionals and users in the design and delivery of public goods and services. Co-production also represents an increasingly apparent mode of engagement with public agencies. Underlying co-production is the idea that networks of public, private, and non-public organisations and partnerships with citizens can increase context-specific and effective solutions while maintaining the public values. Although co-production has often been associated with the delivery of public goods and services, at its core it remains a concept that refers to all phases of delivery processes: co-planning (co-design), co-testing, co-financing, and co-evaluation. Thereby, it aims to create win-win situations that are beneficial for all as cities adapt, transition, or transform into more sustainable and desirable futures.

As interest in co-production grows, however, so does the sense of unclarity for the concept. This unclarity might be rooted in a spectrum of participants or be reflective of the diverse phases of the processes co-production features. Following the argument that this lack of clarity requires attention, this thematic issue seeks to foreground methodologically comparative approaches to study co-production as a way to sharpen understandings and definition of differences and commonalities that might enhance the concept of co-production. These can include, but are not limited to, frameworks and heuristics covering intra-, cross-case variations in single or multiple case studies. To illustrate, distinguishing or discussing actors, modes, or phases of co-productive processes could be points of entry for such comparative insights.


Instructions for Authors:
Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's instructions for authors and submit their abstracts (maximum of 250 words, with a tentative title) through the abstracts system (here). When submitting their abstracts, authors are also asked to confirm that they are aware that Urban Planning is an open access journal with a publishing fee if the article is accepted for publication after peer-review (corresponding authors affiliated with our institutional members do not incur this fee).


Open Access:
The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio's Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal's open access charges and institutional members can be found here.