Urban Planning is a new international peer-reviewed open access journal of urban studies

Open Access Journal | ISSN: 2183-7635

With our plurithematic issues we intend to draw the attention of researchers, policy-makers, scientists and the general public to some of the topics of highest relevance. Scholars interested in editing a themed issue of Urban Planning are encouraged to contact the Editorial Office of the journal (up@cogitatiopress.com).

Published Themed Issues:

Published issues are available here.

Upcoming Issues:

♦♦♦

Volume 3, Issue 1

Title: Crowdsourced Data and Social Media in Participatory Urban Planning

Editors: Bernd Resch (University of Salzburg, Austria; bernd.resch@sbg.ac.at), Peter Zeile (Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany; peter.zeile@kit.edu) and Ourania Kounadi (University of Salzburg, Austria; ourania.kounadi@sbg.ac.at)
Deadline for Full Papers: 15 November 2017
Issue Release: March 2018

Information: Recent technological advances in the context of Web 2.0 developments like social media, smartphones, wearables, etc. have generated an increased demand for citizen involvement into planning processes and the formation of civic participation initiatives. This development has sparked research in the area of citizen-centric planning, making use of social technologies and applications. These neo-democratic developments are increasingly producing a vast amount and wide variety of user-generated data. The availability of these new and large datasets effectively necessitates new data science methods for analysing and visualising user-generated data, and for integrating citizens’ opinions into planning processes. This particularly calls for interdisciplinary approaches between urban planners, geoinformatics professionals, sociologists, computer scientists, environmental scientists, and others.

The overarching objective of this special issue is to foster a deeper understanding of urban processes from user-generated data to improve citizen-centric urban planning, addressing a wide number of application areas such as quality of life, traffic and transportation planning, sustainable tourism or public safety. We particularly encourage the submission of contributions in the following research fields:

- Participatory planning

  • Understanding urban processes from user-generated data
  • Community-based planning
  • Self-organisation and self-sustained neighbourhoods
  • Quality of life

- Crowdsourcing

  • Open Street Map (OSM) and other VGI/CGI platforms
  • Social media: analysis, communication and participation, visualisation

- Participatory and human sensing

  • Human sensing using wearables
  • Participatory sensing to integrate subjective data into planning processes

- Implications of data quality and analysis processes

  • Data quality: uncertainty, sample sizes, data types, limitations, and ambiguity in information extraction
  • Spatial analysis of urban emotions and behaviour
  • Scale specifications for the needs of urban planning

- Field studies and real-world examples: participatory planning in practice

  • Planners’ perspectives and demands w.r.t. geospatial analysis
  • Augmented and Virtual Reality in urban planning

- Bridging urban science and urban planning

Instructions for Authors: Authors interested in submitting a paper to this issue shall carefully read the Instructions for Authors and submit their full papers through the journal's online submission system by 15 November 2017.

Open Access: The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio’s Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal’s open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

♦♦♦

Volume 3, Issue 2

Title: Urban Planning to Enable a 1.5°C Scenario

Editors: Peter Newman (Curtin University and Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) and Aromar Revi (Indian Institute for Human Settlements and Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change)
Deadline for Full Papers: 30 November 2017
Issue Release: April 2018

Information: The Paris Agreement is a challenge for all cities to adapt how they will plan for a world with no fossil fuels. However, there is powerful evidence from climate scientists that we must go beyond this agreement if we are to prevent galloping climate change impacts. They are suggesting a limit of global temperature rise to 1.5°C by 2040. Such a scenario will require dramatic change that may already be underway but needs good frameworks of planning to be enabled. How will cities help create a 1.5°C world? What will emerging cities have to do differently? Can the 1.5°C limit be achieved whilst reaching the Sustainable Development Goals? How critical is the role of urban planning in achieving such transformation?

This issue aims to build on the literature on Cities and Climate Change contained in the Fifth Assessment Report and to produce relevant contributions for the 2018 IPCC Special Report, Global Warming of 1.5°C. The report focuses on the impacts of global warming of 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels and related GHG emission pathways, in the context of strengthening the global response to the threat of climate change, sustainable development, and efforts to eradicate poverty.

Instructions for Authors: Authors interested in submitting a paper to this issue shall carefully read the Instructions for Authors and submit their full papers through the journal's online submission system by 30 November 2017. Authors are also highly encouraged to send an abstract to up@cogitatiopress.com for a first assessment of the submission.

Open Access: The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio’s Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal’s open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

♦♦♦

Volume 3, Issue 2

Title: Urban Planning and the Spatial Ideas of Henri Lefebvre

Editor: Michael E Leary-Owhin (London South Bank University, UK)
Deadline for Full Papers: 15 January 2018
Issue Release: June 2018

Information: Urban planning has an intense concern with ‘urban space’ (including ‘rural space’). Spatial planning evolved as a concept in attempts to integrate the complex social, economic, environmental and political aspects of late 20th century society. Similarly, the spatial ideas of the (neo)Marxist philosopher/sociologist Henri Lefebvre encompass these issues but also stress the importance of culture and history. This special issue of Urban Planning is predicated on three of Lefebvre’s major works:

- The Production of Space (1974/1991)

- Critique of Everyday Life (1981/1991)

- The Urban Revolution (1970/2003)

It draws to a lesser extent on two other texts: Rhythmanalysis (published posthumously in 1992) and Introduction to Modernity (1962/1995).  Lefebvre’s ideas and approach to the investigation of cities and urban society have been taken up most vigorously in the fields of human geography and sociology and latterly architecture. Despite this, it is clear that Lefebvre’s five central concepts: abstract space, the spatial triad, everyday life, the right to the city and planetary urbanism provide powerful tools for the examination of urban planning, cities and urban society in the Global North and South. Urban planning first embraced Lefebvre’s ideas in the 1990s. Surprisingly then, it is only in the last ten years or so that Lefebvrian inspired research, across several aspects of urban planning has become widely accepted but is still emerging.

This special issue of Urban Planning seeks to contribute to and extend the debate regarding the application of Lefebvre’s ideas to the current challenges and opportunities of urban planning. Papers can cover a range of issues e.g.: governance, urban design, urban regeneration, environmental management, community participation, housing, policy making and evaluation, local/strategic planning, infrastructure, international planning, neoliberal urbanism, smart cities, land hunger, urbanisation, gentrification, urban poverty/inequality, the right to the city, new towns/cities, planning history, city management and the law. We welcome papers that present: new empirical research, critical reviews of current issues, theoretical discussions and developments and demonstrate a critical engagement with Lefebvre’s ideas and arguments.

Instructions for Authors: Authors interested in submitting a paper to this issue shall carefully read the Instructions for Authors and submit their full papers through the journal's online submission system by 15 January 2018. Authors are also highly encouraged to send, as early as possible, an abstract to up@cogitatiopress.com for a first assessment of the submission.

Open Access: The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio’s Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal’s open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

♦♦♦

Volume 3, Issue 3

Title: The City of Flows: Urban Planning of Environmental Flows

Editor: Professor Rob Roggema (University of Technology Sydney, Australia)
Deadline for Full Papers: 31 March 2018
Issue Release: September 2018

Information: In the city, numerous environmental flows are being processed, used and wasted. From an environmental point of view, it is important to minimise resources used, process these as efficiently as possible and minimise waste streams. The spatial implications of these urban flows are profound, however only marginally investigated as a design problem. The flows of water, energy, mobility and materials shape the city and the city shapes the possibilities to reduce environmental impact of these flows. In this issue of Urban Planning proposals are sought that focus on the design of these flows at the scale of the city and the neighborhood. Specific attention is given to articles that integrate several or all of these environmental flows. Urban designers, urban planners, urbanists and landscape architects that have undertaken design-led research on the City of Flows are encouraged to submit their articles for this themed issue.

Instructions for Authors: Authors interested in submitting a paper to this issue shall carefully read the Instructions for Authors and submit their full papers through the journal's online submission system by 31 March 2018. Authors are also highly encouraged to send an abstract to up@cogitatiopress.com for a first assessment of the submission.

Open Access: The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio’s Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal’s open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

♦♦♦

Volume 3, Issue 4

Title: The Transformative Power of Urban Planning through Social Innovation

Editors: Torill Nyseth (University of Tromsø, torill.nyseth@uit.no) and Abdelillah Hamdouch (University François-Rabelais of Tours, abdelillah.hamdouch@univ-tours.fr)
Deadline for Abstracts: 31 January 2018
Deadline for Full Papers: 30 June 2018
Issue Release: November 2018

Information: The ambition of this Issue is to contribute to a better articulation between urban planning and local development. We build on the assumption that Social Innovation, through the creative initiatives and socially creative strategies that local actors engage for facing/solving the various socio-economic problems of populations and communities within the urban space (whatever the scale), can be levers for transforming the traditional planning approaches and practices. This conviction relates to the pressures citizens and social actors exert upon planners and local governments for having greater voice in planning and governance processes. Through creativity, participation, local commitment and innovative initiative, we believe that citizens and field actors can nourish the planning processes and orient these towards shared and co-designed projects more likely do meet the socioeconomic, cultural and environmental needs and aspirations of the citizens and local stakeholders. As documented in the collective book Creative Approaches to Planning and Local Development – Insights from Small and Medium-sized Towns in Europe (Hamdouch, Nyseth, Demazière, Førde, Serrano & Aarsæther (Eds.), 2017), there are many case studies and documented examples of innovative planning policies and projects not only in France and Norway, but also from towns in Sweden, Greenland, Greece, Poland, Italy and Canada. Moreover, various publications give evidence that such innovative planning strategies and dynamics occur at various scales of the urban space (from the neighbourhood to the district to the city and its suburbs) in nearly all continents. Finally, there is also evidence that this transformative power of urban planning through social innovation can concern all economic, social, cultural and environmental planning projects (including housing, transports, urban utilities…).

Therefore, the Issue will build on an open approach and seek for theoretical as much as empirical contributions related to various entries (planning approaches, local and community development, social innovation dynamics, governance and power relationships).

Key Readings:

  • Albrechts, L. (2005). Creativity as a driver for change. Planning Theory, 4(3), 247-269.
  • Balducci, A. (2011). Strategic planning as exploration. Town Planning Review, 82(5), 529-547.
  • Drew, P., Klein, J.-L., & Hulsbergen, E. (Eds.). (2008). The challenge of social innovation in urban revitalization. Amsterdam: Techne Press.
  • Hamdouch, A., Nyseth, T., Demazière, C., Førde, A., Serrano, J., & Aarsaether, N. (Eds.). (2017). Creative approaches to planning and local development. Insights from small and medium-sized towns in Europe. London and New York: Routledge.
  • Healey, P. (1997). Collaborative planning, shaping places in fragmented societies. Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press.
  • Healey, P. (2006). Transforming governance: Challenges of institutional adaptation and a new politics of space. European Planning Studies, 14(3), 299-320.
  • Healey, P. (2010). Making better places. The Planning Project in the Twenty-First Century. Basingstoke: Palgrave MacMillan.
  • Knox, P. L., & Mayer, H. (2009). Small Town Sustainability. Basel: Birkhäuser Verlag AG.
  • MacCallum, D., Moulaert, F., Hillier, J., Vicari-Haddock, S. (Eds.). (2009). Social innovation and territorial development. Farnham: Ashgate.
  • Moulaert, F. (2000). Globalization and integrated area development in European cities. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • Moulaert, F., MacCallum, D., Mehmood, A., & Hamdouch, A. (Eds.). (2013). The international handbook on social innovation. Collective action, social learning and transdisciplinary research. Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar.
  • Nyseth, T., & Viken, A. (Eds.). (2009). Place reinvention. Northern perspectives. Farnham: Ashgate.
  • Newman, P. (2008). Strategic spatial planning: Collective action and moments of opportunity. European Planning Studies, 16(10), 1371-1383.
  • Servillo, L., Atkinson, R., & Hamdouch, A. (Eds.). (2017). Small and medium-sized towns in Europe. Special issue of Tijdschrift voor economische en sociale geografie – Journal of Economic and Social Geography, 108(4).
  • Van den Broeck, J., Moulaert, F., Oosterlynck, S. (Eds). (2008). Empowering the Planning Fields. Leuven: Acco.
  • Young, G., & Stevenson, D. (Eds.). (2013). The Ashgate research companion to planning and culture. Farnham: Ashgate.

Instructions for Authors: Authors interested in submitting a paper to this issue shall carefully read the Instructions for Authors and submit their full papers through the journal's online submission system by 30 June 2018.  Authors are also highly encouraged to send, by 31 January 2018, an abstract to up@cogitatiopress.com for a first assessment of the submission.

Open Access: The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio’s Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal’s open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

♦♦♦

Volume 3, Issue 4

Title: Urban Planning and the Suburbs: Solutions for Sustainability from the Edges

Editor: Markus Moos (University of Waterloo, Canada)
Deadline for Abstracts: 30 April 2018
Deadline for Full Papers: 30 June 2018
Issue Release: November 2018

Information: In North American planning discourse, the suburbs are now regularly depicted as problematic. When equated with homogeneous, low-density, car-oriented neighbourhoods that contribute to environmental ills such as sprawl and carbon emissions, suburbs are commonly believed to be in need of a ‘sustainability fix’. Planning solutions to date have largely focused on bringing more urban lifestyles to the suburbs by adding density and transit to reduce car reliance and land consumption, and improving walkability and accessibility.

While these initiatives are likely necessary from a number of perspectives, not least the public finance concerns regarding low-density suburban expansion, there are few who have considered sustainability solutions for the suburbs that do not exclusively rely on ‘urbanizing the suburbs’. There is no question that some densification is required in suburbs. But the urbanization approach is problematic not least because it overlooks the vast area that current low-density suburbs constitute, raising questions about the time required to densify such a large number of neighbourhoods, but also because the increase in density has in many instances contributed to gentrification, not necessarily slowed the pace of suburban expansion elsewhere, and not necessarily reduced car-dependence. 

The intent of this themed issue is for authors to engage with the debates regarding the sustainability of suburbs, broadly defined, in a critical manner, and explore potential and current solutions that go beyond the current focus on densification. Authors are encouraged to seek out and critically present case studies, engage in scenario building, provide comparative policy analysis, and/or present new empirical analysis (qualitative or quantitative) to demonstrate the limits of current policies aimed at densifying the suburbs and present plausible suburban futures that are environmentally sustainable and socially equitable.

What would a ‘made in the suburbs’ solution to environmental sustainability concerns look like? What opportunities do the vast neighbourhoods of cul-de-sacs, lawns, and open-space provide in terms of building affordable housing, sub(urban) agriculture, native plant rehabilitation, or bee keeping? What possibilities does the single-family home offer in terms of multi-generational living, infill, home-based work, or local businesses? Authors are invited to consider these and related questions that could have application and relevance in the North American context but not limited to this geography. We hope that proposals include ideas for suburban sustainability solutions, appropriately contextualized and critically examined, from around the globe.

Instructions for Authors: Authors interested in submitting a paper to this issue shall carefully read the Instructions for Authors and submit their full papers through the journal's online submission system by 30 June 2018. Authors are also highly encouraged to send, by 30 April 2018, their expressions of interest and/or short abstracts to Dr. Markus Moos (mmoos@uwaterloo.ca) and the editorial office (up@cogitatiopress.com)

Open Access: The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio’s Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal’s open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

♦♦♦

Volume 3, Issue 4

Title: European Cities Planning for Asylum

Editors: Franck Eckardt (Bauhaus-Universität Weimar, Germany)
Deadline for Abstracts: 30 April 2018
Deadline for Full Papers: 1 July 2018
Issue Release: November 2018

Information: With the political intention of the EU to develop a common asylum policy, the area of urban planning needs to be understood as a policy field for shaping equal conditions for the hosting and integration of refugees. In this regard, the question on how different planning systems in Europe are working becomes an important subject for further investigation. So far, an overview on the different national asylum systems and their relationship to urban planning does not exist.

This issue works with the intention to create a systematic knowledge on how different national planning systems and cultures are related to the integration of refugees into local contexts. By doing so, it will enable to see communalities and differences and further analysis will enable to link these findings to the different roles of the planning institutions and national legal frameworks. Urban planning thereby does not only fulfil a role within a complex field of relationships to other institutions, it also works with its own concepts, narratives, and interpretations of what is perceived as necessary for integration and planning. In this regard, the issue aims to look at the internal dimension of urban planning processes as well, so that the basic assumptions of local planning procedures regarding integration can be formulated and discussed.

It will furthermore create an in-depth understanding on the effects of different housing strategies for refugees and their impact on the individual integration into relevant domains like the job market, education, social institutions and neighbourhood life, looking at the effects of segregation of refugees due to different understandings of integration and the choice of planning strategies and decisions.

Articles should address one of the following questions:

1. What is the role of urban planning in the hosting and integration of refugees?

2. What are the national frames with regard to the planning of refugee integration?

3. What are the local strategies of urban planning for the hosting of refugees and how are they conceptually linked to the integration of refugees on the long run?

4. What are the local factors that are significant for urban planning to include into an integration plan?

In sum, the overall objective of this issue is to deliver a comprehension on the potential role urban planning can have to support the long-term integration of refugees and to identify possible effects of different chosen strategies. It aims to provide knowledge on the current state of urban planning with regard to refugee integration, including especially housing but also other relevant domains. In the light of the political relevance of a joined EU asylum policy, this issue wants to contribute to set up an academic basis for both further research in the field of urban planning/urban studies as well for the consultancy of future European policies on the subject of refugee integration, basing its theoretical approach from a variety of research and academic discourses. It is linked to the following concepts:

Urban planning system: The understanding of urban planning as being partly understandable as an institution of a multi-layered state. Competences and obligations, relationships to other institutions and to the citizenry are framed by the wider political system and to some extent by the European unification process. In this regard, the concept of “urban governance” as a broadening of the state activities to steer society is followed (see P. Le Galès, 2011).

Refugee studies: Refugees are a particular group of inhabitants which are characterized by specific social aspects, in particular the remaining uncertainty regarding their asylum status, their future position in society, the possibilities of return to their home country. Furthermore, the social abilities of refugees to integrate into society are regarded to be not only depending on their professional, language and social skills but also on their psychological well-being (Black, 2010).

Urban planning culture: While the planning system looks at the embedding of planning, the planning culture needs to be analysed with regard to its internal conceptualisation and self-interpretation (see Othengrafen, 2012). This allows to identify different understandings of planning concepts and discourses. This is important as planning for integration remains a weak legal concept and therefore requires a massive work of interpretation by the planners themselves.

Local integration policies: Research on this field works with the assumption that cities are the main field of integration of refugees. Most of this literature derives from research on migrants and not particularly on refugees. However, the concept appears applicable to some extent, especially as there is laid out a basis for European comparison which can be followed regarding refugees as well (see Borkert, 2007).

Integration dynamics: Current research has been identifying different dynamics of integration which unfold after the settlement of migrants (see Poteet and Nourpanah, 2016). In conclusion, this so far has been confirming the significance of the location of housing for the further development of the induvial integration process. The physical access to the institutional or societal offer of jobs, education, social infrastructure and urban amenities is of crucial significance, as well as the questions of neighbourhood effects, segregation and spatial mismatch.

Segregation: Supported by observations in most EU countries, planning and management of hosting refugees has been resulting so far in a housing situation that is characterized by social and physical segregation. However, new approaches to segregation support the assumption that not only housing segregation needs to be considered but all domains which are relevant in everyday life (van Ham, 2016). This leads to the conceptualisation of local integration and urban planning that goes beyond the providence of housing for refugees and to a holistic plan for integration.

Key Readings:

  • Black, R. (2001). Fifty years of refugee studies: From theory to policy. International Migration Review, 35(1), 57-78.
  • Borkert, M., Bosswick, W., Heckmann, F., & Lüken-Klaßen, D. (2007). Local integration policies for migrants in Europe.
  • Le Galès, P. (2003). Le retour des villes européennes: Sociétés urbaines, mondialisation, gouvernement et gouvernance.
  • van Ham, M., & Tammaru, T. (2016). New perspectives on ethnic segregation over time and space. A domains approach. Urban Geography, 37(7), 953-962.
  • Othengrafen, F. (2016). Uncovering the unconscious dimensions of planning: Using culture as a tool to analyse spatial planning practices.
  • Poteet, M., & Nourpanah, S. (Eds.). (2016). After the Flight: The Dynamics of Refugee Settlement and Integration.

Instructions for Authors: Authors interested in submitting a paper to this issue shall carefully read the Instructions for Authors and submit their full papers through the journal's online submission system by 1 July 2018.  Authors are also highly encouraged to send, by 30 April, an abstract to up@cogitatiopress.com for a first assessment of the submission.

Open Access: The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio’s Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal’s open access charges and institutional members can be found here.