Urban Planning is a new international peer-reviewed open access journal of urban studies

Open Access Journal | ISSN: 2183-7635

With our plurithematic issues we intended to draw the attention of researchers, policy-makers, scientists and the general public to some of the topics of highest relevance. Scholars interested in guest editing a thematic issue of Urban Planning are kindly invited to contact the Editorial Office of the journal ([email protected]).

Published Thematic Issues

Published issues are available here.

Upcoming Issues


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Volume 7, Issue 4

Title:
Healthy Cities: Effective Urban Planning Approaches to a Changing World


Editor(s):
Elmira Jamei (Victoria University), Simona Azzali (Prince Sultan University), Hendrik Tieben (The Chinese University of Hong Kong), and K Thirumaran (James Cook University in Singapore)

Submission of Abstracts: 1-15 December 2021
Submission of Full Papers: 15-30 April 2022
Publication of the Issue: October/December 2022

Information:
The WHO Healthy Cities initiative was conceived with the goal of placing health as the top priority on the cities’ agenda, through promoting healthy urban planning, sustainable development and innovative multisectoral change. In fact, Healthy Cities is a strategic vehicle for health development and well-being in urban settings which puts people and communities at the heart of the urban planning process.

 

Given the rapid change in today’s world (population growth, natural hazards, climate change, and outbreak of new diseases), Healthy Cities has gained new attention and significant prominence in the context of the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals (particularly SDGs 3-11).

The aim of this thematic issue is to collect articles which aim at integrating health considerations into cities’ urban planning processes, programmes, and projects and establish the necessary capacity to achieve this goal. The articles will discuss how public spaces, neighbourhoods, and cities have an impact on physical, mental, and environmental health, and highlight the important role of urban planning in providing multiple health benefits to communities. This thematic issue welcomes original research articles and case studies that promote Healthy Cities initiative explicitly through urban planning and form a debate on how health is impacted by different sectors, projects, and policies by discussing necessary actions from different points of view.

We welcome contributions covering, but not limited to, the following topics:

  • Healthy Urban planning for ageing population;
  • Climate change impacts on health;
  • Urban Planning responses to Covid-19;
  • Protecting communities from natural hazards;
  • Disaster Management and Resilience through healthy urban planning;
  • Walkability and public health;
  • Capacity building and policy transfer for healthy cities;
  • Planning for well-being and mental health;
  • Blue-Green-Grey Infrastructure and Healthy Cities;
  • Healthy Cities and Sustainable Economy and Tourism;
  • People-Centered Cities.

Instructions for Authors:
Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's instructions for authors and submit their abstracts (maximum of 250 words, with a tentative title) through the abstracts system (here). When submitting their abstracts, authors are also asked to confirm that they are aware that Urban Planning is an open access journal with a publishing fee if the article is accepted for publication after peer-review (corresponding authors affiliated with our institutional members do not incur this fee).


Open Access:
The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio's Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal's open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

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Volume 7, Issue 4

Title:
Vertical Cities: The Development of High-Rise Neighbourhoods


Editor(s):
Brian Webb (Cardiff University) and James White (University of Glasgow)

Submission of Abstracts: 1-15 December 2021
Submission of Full Papers: 15-30 April 2022
Publication of the Issue: October/December 2022

Information:
High-rise neighbourhoods, comprising clusters of multi-storey tower blocks, are now ubiquitous features in the urban landscape in many cities around the world. The planning and development of these vertical neighbourhoods is the result of numerous forces, including demographic change, migration, global flows of finance, sustainable policies that favour density and urban intensification, and changing real estate markets. Urban planners play a key role not only in facilitating the design and development of these new vertical neighbourhoods but also in addressing and managing the variegated impacts of these developments on the built environment and the residents that live in and around them.

The aim of this thematic issue is to critically explore how planning practice influences the design and development of high-rise neighbourhoods, ranging from the positive role planning plays as a shaper of the built environment as well as the culpability of planners in facilitating a form of development that is increasingly thought to exasperate inequalities, achieve poor environmental standards, and funnel public investment into emerging middle-class neighbourhoods.

Authors are encouraged to submit papers to this thematic issue on topics including but not limited to:

• Theoretical contributions that consider the intersection between planning practice and the wider dynamics of neighbourhood vertical urbanisation;

• The role of politics, public policy, and/or governance systems and the law in shaping high-rise neighbourhood planning outcomes;

• The design and morphology of high-rise neighbourhoods and the planning tools used to shape them;

• The future of vertical neighbourhoods given changing socio-economic trends;

• How planning decisions influence the lived experience of high-rise neighbourhoods;

• The interface between real estate markets, finance, and the planning of high-rise neighbourhoods;

• How different forms of high-rise housing tenure result in distinctive neighbourhood planning and design outcomes;

• The implications of the COVID-19 pandemic on existing and planned high-rise neighbourhoods.


Instructions for Authors:
Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's instructions for authors and submit their abstracts (maximum of 250 words, with a tentative title) through the abstracts system (here). When submitting their abstracts, authors are also asked to confirm that they are aware that Urban Planning is an open access journal with a publishing fee if the article is accepted for publication after peer-review (corresponding authors affiliated with our institutional members do not incur this fee).


Open Access:
The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio's Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal's open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

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Volume 7, Issue 4

Title:
Localizing Social Infrastructures: Welfare, Equity, and Community


Editor(s):
Lina Berglund-Snodgrass (Blekinge Institute of Technology), Maria Fjellfeldt (Dalarna University), and Ebba Högström (Blekinge Institute of Technology)

Submission of Abstracts: 1-15 December 2021
Submission of Full Papers: 15-30 April 2022
Publication of the Issue: October/December 2022

Information:
Localizing social infrastructures (e.g., facilities for elder care, supported accommodations for people with disabilities, facilities for communal use such as community centres, libraries, youth clubs, playgrounds, sport and religious facilities etc.) in all its complexities of public expenditure, privatizations of public operations, market-led land-use planning, and segregation processes is challenging for contemporary welfare societies. The localizing of social infrastructure addresses the challenges connected to managing spatially differentiated socio-economic landscapes.

 

Traditionally, social infrastructures have been located in the midst of the urban (and rural) fabric, not seldom occupying prominent places, and seconded by high quality architecture. Social infrastructures have also played an important role in the development of the welfare state where they have been used as ‘tools’ in the overarching neighborhood planning paradigm for conveying democratic values and promoting social equity. Today, the landscape of welfare facilities appears as dispersed and somewhat elusive as new purpose-built schools may be located centrally in new urban developments or retrofitted in derelict industrial buildings in the outskirts of housing districts or located in generic office spaces – as one among many exchangeable tenants.

Localizing social infrastructure includes both spatial/geographical and administrative/legal considerations. It also involves a multitude of actors as well as the navigating different responsibilities, making localizing a complex matter of interactions and collaborations. This opens up questions such as: What social infrastructure is localized where and on what grounds? Which social inequalities and/or stigma will be brought to the fore by certain choices of locations? How will this affect citizen’s sense of belonging, identity and community? Localizing social infrastructure is a truly geographical endeavor closely connected to urban planning and social work.

This thematic issue seeks to chart the localizing of social infrastructures from an urban planning perspective and address the topic in a broad sense concerning questions such as i) the preconditions for localizing such facilities in the urban landscape, ii) the social consequences of the localizing of such facilities for individuals as well as, iii) for the long-term social sustainability of the wider community. We are interested in contributions that tackle localizing of social infrastructures in their historical, contemporary or future dimensions. We welcome proposals taking on board the ‘where’, ‘what’ and ‘why’ regarding this, and envision contributions from a multitude of theoretical perspectives and angles. Due to the multi-disciplinary aspects of this topic, we invite scholars from outside urban planning, e.g., social work, sociology, geography, political science and architecture.

References

Dear, M. (1978) Planning for Mental Health Care: A Reconsideration of Public Facility Location Theory.
International Regional Science Review 3(2), 93-111.

DeVerteuil, G. (2010) Reconsidering the legacy of urban public facility location theory in human
geography. Progress in Human Geography 24(1), 47–69.

Fjellfeldt, M., Berglund-Snodgrass, L., Högström, E., Markström, U., (forthcoming). Institutional fringes –
exploring location strategies of supported housing in a post-deinstitutional era. Social Inclusion.

Högström, E. (2018). 'It used to be here but moved somewhere else': Post-asylum spatialisations - a new
urban frontier? Social & Cultural Geography, 19(3).

Klinenberg, E. (2018). Palaces for the people-how social infrastructure can help fight inequality,
polarization, and the decline of civic life. New York, Crown Publishing Group.

Latham, A. & Layton, J. (2019) Social infrastructure and the public life of cities: studying urban sociality
and public spaces. Geography Compass, 13e12444.


Instructions for Authors:
Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's instructions for authors and submit their abstracts (maximum of 250 words, with a tentative title) through the abstracts system (here). When submitting their abstracts, authors are also asked to confirm that they are aware that Urban Planning is an open access journal with a publishing fee if the article is accepted for publication after peer-review (corresponding authors affiliated with our institutional members do not incur this fee).


Open Access:
The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio's Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal's open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

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Volume 8, Issue 1

Title:
Bombed Cities: Legacies of Post-War Planning on the Contemporary Urban and Social Fabric


Editor(s):
Seraphim Alvanides (Northumbria University) and Carol Ludwig (GESIS Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences)

Submission of Abstracts: 15-31 October 2021
Submission of Full Papers: 15-31 July 2022
Publication of the Issue: January/March 2023

Information:
Post-Second World War reconstruction is now an important field of research around the world, with strands of enquiry investigating architecture, urban archaeology, heritage studies, urban design, city planning, critical cartography, and social geography. This thematic issue seeks to provide a critical statement on mid-twentieth century urban planning, starting from the period of the Second World War. The issue seeks to extend the accounts by Hohn (1993), Diefendorf (1993), and more recently Pendlebury et al. (2015), by examining how the early planning visions and decisions have been imprinted on today’s urban and social fabric of various bombed cities. We are looking for contributions that examine post-war reconstruction not only from the mainstream actualised perspective, but also considered by alternative visions and strategies—not only from Europe but also from other countries affected by the aftermath of the Second World War. The emphasis of the thematic issue is on empirically driven studies of post-catastrophic damage and reconstruction, actualised through qualitative, quantitative, mixed methodologies.

 

We encourage detailed studies of early post-war cities demonstrating how urban planning practices recorded destruction and subsequently reshaped and reimagined historic city centres and their surroundings. Contributions on (but not limited to) the following themes are welcome:

  • Alternative visions and strategies of post-war city reconstruction and their realisation;
  • Legacies of post-war urban transformation—successes and failures;
  • Longitudinal analysis of the implications of destruction/urban transformation on cities today (social, economic, environmental, etc.);
  • Theoretical reflections on post-war urban planning;
  • Comparative case studies of cities within/between countries and continents;
  • The use of innovative methodologies, in particular spatial digital humanities methods.

References:

Diefendorf J. 1993. In the wake of war: The reconstruction of German cities after World War II. Oxford University Press.

Hohn U. 1993. Die Zerstörung deutscher Städte 1940 bis 1945: Luftkrieg und Stadtplanung, Schadenserfassung und Schadensbilanz , in: Kriegszerstörung und Wiederaufbau deutscher Städte, Eds.: Josef Nipper / Manfred Nutz, Köln, 1993, S. 3-24.

Pendlebury J., Erten E. & Larkham P. 2015. Alternative visions of post-war reconstruction. Routledge.


Instructions for Authors:
Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's instructions for authors and submit their abstracts (maximum of 250 words, with a tentative title) through the abstracts system (here). When submitting their abstracts, authors are also asked to confirm that they are aware that Urban Planning is an open access journal with a publishing fee if the article is accepted for publication after peer-review (corresponding authors affiliated with our institutional members do not incur this fee).


Open Access:
The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio's Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal's open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

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Volume 8, Issue 1

Title:
Social Justice in the Green City


Editor(s):
Roberta Cucca (Norwegian University of Life Sciences) and Thomas Thaler (University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences)

Submission of Abstracts: 1-15 March 2022
Submission of Full Papers: 15-31 July 2022
Publication of the Issue: January/March 2023

Information:
While global urban development is increasingly oriented towards strategies for sustainability and green urbanism, both the ecological and equity implications of these developments are mostly overlooked. Access to urban public green and blue spaces is indeed unequally distributed in contemporary cities, and the COVID-19 lockdowns have shade light on the necessity of providing equal access to green urban spaces in order to guarantee a healthy sound living environment for all the inhabitants. Issues related to environmental justice and socio-spatial justice are increasing interviewed in contemporary cities, and call for a better understanding of the global and local mechanisms of production and reproduction of environmental and spatial inequalities. Indeed, the implementation of strategies to improve the quality and availability of the green and blue infrastructures may have unintended outcomes to the citizens, such as acting as a trigger for gentrification processes.

This results in demands for intersectional and relational approaches to justice in urban greening strategies and suggestions for a “just green enough” approach that do not lead to undesired social effects such as displacement or increase in housing costs.

In this framework, Urban Planning will publish a thematic issue on how planning processes and policy responses can alternatively act as mechanisms limiting or increasing new social and spatial green inequalities in contemporary cities. The thematic issue welcomes contributions on:

- Costs, benefits, and distributional consequences of various infrastructural options for urban greening;

- Theoretical reflections on new paradigms inspiring urban planning and renewal strategies in cities, such as “Just sustainability” and “Just green enough” approach;

- Strategic urban planning tools and policy processes taking into account distributional consequences;

- Methodological challenges and innovations in the study of social and environmental justice in the green city.

Authors are invited to submit an abstract (approximately 250 words) that describes the proposed article by 1-15 March 2022. Authors will be invited to submit a full manuscript by 15-31 July 2022. Articles in Urban Planning should not exceed 6,000 words in the initial submission of the manuscript. Upon revision, manuscripts should not exceed 8,000 words (refer to the journal’s guidelines). All submitted manuscripts will be reviewed following the journal’s standard double-blind peer-review process. Please contact the Academic Editors (Roberta Cucca, [email protected], and Thomas Thaler, [email protected]) for additional information or questions regarding the content of your contribution. Regarding other queries (deadlines, instructions for authors, etc.), please contact Urban Planning directly ([email protected]).


Instructions for Authors:
Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's instructions for authors and submit their abstracts (maximum of 250 words, with a tentative title) through the abstracts system (here). When submitting their abstracts, authors are also asked to confirm that they are aware that Urban Planning is an open access journal with a publishing fee if the article is accepted for publication after peer-review (corresponding authors affiliated with our institutional members do not incur this fee).


Open Access:
The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio's Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal's open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

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Volume 8, Issue 1

Title:
Urban Heritage and Patterns of Change: Spatial Practices of Physical and Non-Physical Transformation


Editor(s):
Frank Eckardt (Bauhaus-University Weimar) and Aliaa AlSadaty (Cairo University)

Submission of Abstracts: 1-15 March 2022
Submission of Full Papers: 15-31 July 2022
Publication of the Issue: January/March 2023

Information:
Change is an important and essential part of life. In urban geographies, change involves any alteration in the urban environment, whether this alteration is associated with decline and decay or growth and prosperity of urban settings. The world is currently facing epochal changes that affect all aspects of life. Architectural and urban heritage are at the core of the process of change. The pace of urban change in heritage areas, however, differs widely across the world. In some areas, it is very slow due to heritage designation; in other parts it is an astonishingly rapid process with risk of erosion of heritage and urban areas of value. This could be due to rapid economic and demographic growth coupled with reluctance or absence of heritage protection laws. Nevertheless, change in heritage urban areas is not only confined to the physical aspects of change. Since urban spaces and settings are venues for human interactions and experiences, urban change is also widely affected by and affects non-physical aspects including socio-political practices, economic implications, and cultural impacts.

 

In this regard, this thematic issue looks at the various patterns of the interrelationship between heritage and urban change from both the physical and non-physical sides. Looking at the physical aspects of heritage and change includes but is not limited to investigations related with morphological transformation, post-disasters developments, infill interventions, urban growth and urbanization impacts, among others. Non-physical aspects of change also include, for instance, issues related to change of various races and classes within societies, positive and negative impacts of gentrification of historic urban areas, and the movement of populations, capitals, and goods and their impacts on historic and heritage urban areas.


Instructions for Authors:
Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's instructions for authors and submit their abstracts (maximum of 250 words, with a tentative title) through the abstracts system (here). When submitting their abstracts, authors are also asked to confirm that they are aware that Urban Planning is an open access journal with a publishing fee if the article is accepted for publication after peer-review (corresponding authors affiliated with our institutional members do not incur this fee).


Open Access:
The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio's Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal's open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

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Volume 8, Issue 2

Title:
Queer(ing) Urban Planning and Municipal Governance


Editor(s):
Alison L. Bain (York University) and Julie A. Podmore (John Abbott College)

Submission of Abstracts: 1-15 June 2022
Submission of Full Papers: 15-31 October 2022
Publication of the Issue: April/June 2023

Information:
Despite a decade of research, LGBTQ+ urban planning issues have yet to be ‘mainstreamed’ and evenly integrated into the everyday work of municipal governance. Through theoretical reflection and methodological innovation, this thematic issue critically scales up the existing LGBTQ+ urban planning scholarship from neighbourhoods to city-regions and empirically extends research frameworks to surface the messy materialities of municipal governance for sexual and gender non-normative subjects. Building on a legacy of queer scholarship that questions urban planning’s heteronormative assumptions and addresses the need for inclusive queer spaces, the thematic issue continues the investigation into LGBTQ2S spaces, but specifically extends the scope of the discussion historically, geographically, and thematically. It engages with plans and policies that address LGBTQ+ needs for infrastructure provision, social services and community facilities access, housing and economic development, community-event financing, public safety, social inclusion, and civic participation. Critical interdisciplinary engagement will be organized under three key themes and subthemes:

 

 

 

 

 

1. Socio-spatial regulation

a) The role of past and present bylaws, licenses, zoning, and plans in regulating LGBTQ+ lives in cities and suburbs.

b) The impacts of normative constructions of families, gender, and sexuality on community development plans and housing policies.

c) The (re)production of LGBTQ+ exclusions in public spaces through urban redevelopment priorities and/or policing strategies.

2. Queering plans and policies

a) The place of LGBTQ+ knowledge, networks, and lived experiences in social inclusion policies and community plans shaped by municipal agendas for creative, livable, digital, and sustainable cities.

b) The extent to which queer and transgender competencies inform municipal urban planning and policymaking.

c) The conflicts, impediments, and contradictions found in municipal urban planning and policymaking responses to queering planning.

3. Governance coalitions and activisms

a) The role of LGBTQ+ activists in reworking and resisting municipal logics to build community resilience.

b) Instances when LGBTQ+-inclusivity exceeds social planning to engage with an (in)visibility politics that may impact upon the tangible materialities of infrastructure.

c) The tensions, disconnects, and misrecognitions generated through the integration of LGBTQ+ and QTBIPOC activists into local participatory urban planning processes and planning discourses.


Instructions for Authors:
Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's instructions for authors and submit their abstracts (maximum of 250 words, with a tentative title) through the abstracts system (here). When submitting their abstracts, authors are also asked to confirm that they are aware that Urban Planning is an open access journal with a publishing fee if the article is accepted for publication after peer-review (corresponding authors affiliated with our institutional members do not incur this fee).


Open Access:
The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio's Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal's open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

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Volume 8, Issue 2

Title:
Smart Engagement with Citizens: Integrating “the Smart” into Inclusive Public Participation and Community Planning


Editor(s):
Jin-Kyu Jung (University of Washington) and Jung Eun Kang (Pusan National University)

Submission of Abstracts: 1-15 June 2022
Submission of Full Papers: 15-31 October 2022
Publication of the Issue: April/June 2023

Information:
The discourse of the smart city epitomizes a new paradigm shift in urban planning and cities. Smart cities require and are powered by smart city principles to succeed, including smart technologies, infrastructure, and governance; however, they also need to engage closely with the citizens in embracing the diverse perspectives, experiences, and opportunities of living in smart cities—smart engagement. Creative engagements/encounters with the ordinary citizens are essential for unbinding possibilities of creating inclusive smart communities that enhance citizen participation, provide meaningful educated information, advocate for greater equity in public policies, and ultimately empower citizens (Coe et al., 2001; Harvey, 2000; Visvizi & Lytras, 2019; Zukin, 1995).

 

The smart city discourses focus on a techno-centered digital solution to urban problems/issues, to make cities more responsive, efficient, sustainable, and intelligent. It considers the use of technical or technological infrastructures and interventions as a means to ensure optimum efficiency with regards to urban planning and sustainable development (Goodman et al., 2020; Hollands, 2008; Roche, 2014). Smart cities can be also built based more on collaborative democratic approaches in which cities provide access to data and allow citizens to be part of urban innovation processes, thus building city governance through open and participatory people-centric approaches (Cardullo & Kitchin, 2019; Helgason, 2002; Lee & Lee, 2014; O’Grady & O’Hare, 2012). Community engagement and citizen participation are not exclusive to smart cities and smart city planning (Arnstein, 1967; Innes & Booher, 2004; Staeheli, 2005); however, smart cities have shed a new light on these concepts and practices by providing new means to enable inclusive public citizen participation in urban and community planning process. There is a potential for smart engagement to represent the kind of direct democracy and participatory planning that define a vibrant civil society, with citizens engaged as active participants in the inclusive planning process with the ability to connect humans through physical, digital, online, and hybrid engagement.

This thematic issue invites scholars who are interested in a variety of new visions, facets and methods, practices, and tools for enabling smart engagements, in which smart technologies, infrastructure and governance, and inclusive planning processes all together foster social inclusion, democratization, communications, and engagements with the citizens. These bind the prospect of smart communities in which citizens are actively involved in the design of smart cities as users/consumers, as well as participants and co-producers. Case studies from inter- and trans-national perspectives to better examine the extent of citizen participation and engagement in smart cities are encouraged.

Authors are invited to address any of the following topics (but not limited to):

  • Collaborative democracy and citizen participation in smart cities;
  • Inequality, justice, and social and digital division in smart city planning;
  • Community-based climate change planning with “the smart”;
  • Smart engagement and community platforms;
  • Smart engagement for urban regeneration;
  • Assessment and evaluation of smart engagement.

References:

Arnstein, S. R. (1967). A ladder of citizen participation. Journal of American Planning Association, 35(4), 216-224.

Cardullo, P., & Kitchin, R. (2019). Being a ‘citizen’ in the smart city: Up and down the scaffold of smart citizen participation in Dublin, Ireland. GeoJournal. 84(1), 1-13.

Coe, A., Paquet, G., & Roy, J. (2001). E-governance and smart communities: A social learning challenge. Social Science Computer Review, 19(1), 80-93.

Goodman, N., Zwick, A., Spicer, Z., & Carlsen, N. (2020). Public engagement in smart city development: Lessons from communities in Canada's smart city challenge. The Canadian Geographer, 64(3), 416-432.

Harvey, D. (2000). Spaces of hope. Edinburgh University Press.

Helgason, W. (2002, November 15). Inclusion through a digital lens [Paper presentation]. Thinking Smart Cities, Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada.

Hollands, R. G. (2008). Will the real smart city please stand up? City: Analysis of Urban Trends, Culture, Theory, Policy, Action, 12(3), 303-320.

Innes, J. E., & Booher, D. E. (2004). Reframing public participation: Strategies for the 21st century. Planning Theory & Practice, 5(4), 419-436.

Lee, J., & Lee, H. (2014). Developing and validating a citizen-centric typology for smart city service. Government Information Quarterly, 31(1), S93-S105.

O'Grady, M., & O'Hare, G. (2012). How smart is your city? Science, 335, 1581-1582.

Roche, S. (2014). Geographic Information Science I: Why does a smart city need to be spatially enabled? Progress in Human Geography, 38(5), 703-711.

Staeheli, L. A. (2005). Can American cities be sites of citizenship? What can we do about it? Urban Geography, 26(3), 197-199.

Visvizi, A., & Lytras, M. D. (2019). Smart cities: Issues and challenges. Elsevier.

Zukin, S. (1995). The culture of cities. Blackwell.


Instructions for Authors:
Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's instructions for authors and submit their abstracts (maximum of 250 words, with a tentative title) through the abstracts system (here). When submitting their abstracts, authors are also asked to confirm that they are aware that Urban Planning is an open access journal with a publishing fee if the article is accepted for publication after peer-review (corresponding authors affiliated with our institutional members do not incur this fee).


Open Access:
The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio's Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal's open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

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Volume 8, Issue 2

Title:
Planning around Polarization


Editor(s):
Oswald Devisch (Hasselt University), Liesbeth Huybrechts (Hasselt University), Anna Seravalli (Malmö University), and Seppe De Blust (ETH Zürich)

Submission of Abstracts: 1-15 July 2022
Submission of Full Papers: 15-31 October 2022
Publication of the Issue: April/June 2023

Information:
Spatial transformation processes illuminate latent conflicts over ownership, externalities, priorities, among others. Thinking about and deciding on future uses and imaginaries confronts people with the inequalities and systemic constraints that shape the reality they live in. Over the last decades, scholars have been pointing out how banal planning quarrels increasingly get caught in polarized discussions touching on more fundamental differences and worldviews. If it is the role of urban planners to make these conflicts productive, it becomes highly important to explore how our working methods engage with these more ontological discussions.

 

Collins and Raymond (2006), for instance, propose to not only see (participatory) planning as a matter of providing all participants with the possibility of “having a say” but also as an opportunity to bring different forms of knowledge together to learn together about a specific issue (Pretty 1995; Collins and Raymond 2006). To trigger this learning, Whatmore (2009) proposes to build ‘competency groups’ around opposing collectives in order to deconstruct their ‘knowledge controversies’. Podziba (2012), in turn, invites us to shift our focus from working towards shared values to learning to respect opposing value frameworks. Torfing et al. (2020) illustrate how competing governance paradigms co-exist in all public organizations and provide clues on how planners can navigate in highly conflictual contexts.

With this thematic issue, we want to draw lessons from these recent experiences in planning around polarization. We are interested in frameworks and cases that describe attempts to reorder how we perceive, think, act, and engage with our own self and the object of planning as living systems; how we can organize and engage with conflicts by introducing non-dualistic viewpoints and processes that blur the disjuncture between rational theory and social practice; and how we can rethink the instruments of planning to fundamentally engage with its relational nature.

 

References:

Collins, K. & Raymond, I. (2006). Dare we jump off Arnstein’s ladder? Social learning as a new policy paradigm. In: Proceedings of PATH (Participatory Approaches in Science & Technology) Conference, 4-7 June 2006, Edinburgh.

Podziba, S. L. (2012). Civic Fusion: Mediating Polarized Public Disputes. American Bar Association.

Torfing, J., Andersen, L. B., Greve, C. & Klausen, K. K. (2020). Public governance paradigms: Competing and co-existing. Edward Elgar Publishing.

Whatmore, S. (2009), Mapping knowledge controversies: science, democracy and the redistribution of expertise, Progress in Human Geography, 33: 587–98.


Instructions for Authors:
Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's instructions for authors and submit their abstracts (maximum of 250 words, with a tentative title) through the abstracts system (here). When submitting their abstracts, authors are also asked to confirm that they are aware that Urban Planning is an open access journal with a publishing fee if the article is accepted for publication after peer-review (corresponding authors affiliated with our institutional members do not incur this fee).


Open Access:
The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio's Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal's open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

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Volume 8, Issue 3

Title:
Shipping Canals in Transition: Rethinking Spatial, Economic, and Environmental Dimensions From Sea to Hinterland


Editor(s):
Carola Hein (Delft University of Technology), Sabine Luning (Leiden University), Han Meyer (Delft University of Technology), and Paul van de Laar (Erasmus University of Technology)

Submission of Abstracts: 1-15 October 2022
Submission of Full Papers: 15-31 January 2023
Publication of the Issue: July/September 2023

Information:
Shipping canals have been at the heart of economic and spatial restructuring for many centuries; they are hubs for political claims, economic development, ecological rethinking of urban deltas, port city territories and the water-land intersection. Shipping canals are an excellent object for the study of extended urbanization and current reflections on infrastructure as socio-culture objects. The New Waterway in the Netherlands, created in the 19th century, served as a catalyst for a fundamental transition: it led to the explosive growth of the port and city of Rotterdam and was accompanied by a structural change in the river drainage system and of the nature in and around the estuary, including the development of the industrial port complex Botlek-Europoort-Maasvlakte in the mid-20th century. The Maas estuary changed from an estuary to an industrial port canal that must be dredged annually. Today, new fundamental transitions are needed, raising the question whether this and other shipping canals globally can act as a motor transitions: in the field of water management and flood protection, in the field of biodiversity, the restoration of the ecosystem in the estuary, in the field of energy transition in the industrial port complex and in light of heritage structures, and in the field of the regional spatial structure and strong 'green-blue' structures. This thematic issue calls for contributions that consider the regional, economic, global logistical, natural dimensions of international shipping canals such as the New Waterway, the Suez and Panama canals, the Rhine-Main-Danube Canal, the Erie Canal, or the Houston ship channel. The thematic issue invites participants to (re)think the values that drive (water)engineering, economies of scale, political and legal instruments that have allowed for the construction—land ownership, expropriation, or land use—and maintenance of the canals as well as their future as part of nature-culture ecosystems.


Instructions for Authors:
Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's instructions for authors and submit their abstracts (maximum of 250 words, with a tentative title) through the abstracts system (here). When submitting their abstracts, authors are also asked to confirm that they are aware that Urban Planning is an open access journal with a publishing fee if the article is accepted for publication after peer-review (corresponding authors affiliated with our institutional members do not incur this fee).


Open Access:
The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio's Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal's open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

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Volume 8, Issue 3

Title:
Car Dependency and Urban Form


Editor(s):
Kobe Boussauw (Vrije Universiteit Brussel), Koos Fransen (Vrije Universiteit Brussel / Ghent University), and Enrica Papa (University of Westminster)

Submission of Abstracts: 1-15 June 2022
Submission of Full Papers: 15-31 October 2022
Publication of the Issue: July 2023

Information:
The degree to which urban societies have become car dependent has been a rewarding research topic for decades. In 1989, Newman and Kenworthy (1989) developed a line of research in which car dependency was initially related to urban form. Although their work quickly became very influential in the field of spatial planning, their research design has become subject to methodological criticism, while their notion of car dependency has been found too narrow. Later research proposed an alternative conceptualisation of car dependency and stressed the importance of differentiating between car-dependent people and car-dependent trips (Goodwin, 1995). More recent publications distinguish between three different understandings of car dependency: micro (car dependency as an attribute of individuals), meso (as an attribute of particular trips, activities or practices), and macro (as an attribute of society) (Mattioli et al., 2016). Moreover, there is growing consensus that car dependency is a problem that is intertwined with all facets of society and therefore cannot simply be reduced to a characteristic of urban form. Nonetheless, the question of the impact of urban form on car dependency remains a hot topic among spatial planners and mobility planners. We therefore launch a call for scholarly contributions that take a contemporary look at the problem of car dependency and urban form, both in the global North and in the global South, based on a genuine concern about how we can shape future urbanisation and urban redevelopment in a less car-oriented manner.

Contributions can focus on, but are not limited to, the following topics:

 - Determinants of actual, perceived, and subjective car dependency in urban settings: importance of design of public space, walkability, bikeability, or transit-oriented development;

- Forced car ownership, forced long-distance commuting, and car-dependent passengers;

- Mobility induced social exclusion, transport disadvantage, and car dependency;

- Urban form, society, and culture;

- Travel behaviour, residential self-selection, and mode choice;

- Sustainable urban planning and policy in relation to reducing car dependency;

- Spatial and socio-demographic variations of car dependency;

- Direct and indirect costs of car-dependent built environments.

 

References:

- Goodwin, P. (1995). Car dependence. Transport Policy, 2(3), 151–152.

- Mattioli, G., Anable, J., & Vrotsou, K. (2016). Car dependent practices: Findings from a sequence pattern mining study of UK time use data. Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, 89, 56–72.

- Newman, P., & Kenworthy, J. (1989). Cities and automobile dependence: An international sourcebook. Gower.


Instructions for Authors:
Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's instructions for authors and submit their abstracts (maximum of 250 words, with a tentative title) through the abstracts system (here). When submitting their abstracts, authors are also asked to confirm that they are aware that Urban Planning is an open access journal with a publishing fee if the article is accepted for publication after peer-review (corresponding authors affiliated with our institutional members do not incur this fee).


Open Access:
The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio's Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal's open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

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Volume 8, Issue 3

Title:
Assessing the Complex Contributions of Christopher Alexander


Editor(s):
Michael W. Mehaffy (Sustasis Foundation) and Tigran Haas (KTH Royal Institute of Technology)

Submission of Abstracts: 1-15 September 2022
Submission of Full Papers: 15-31 January 2023
Publication of the Issue: July/September 2023

Information:
Christopher Alexander, who died this March, was undeniably one of the most influential, if sometimes controversial, urban thinkers of the last half-century. His career began at Walter Gropius' Harvard in the late 1950s and spanned well into the 21st century, with deep influences within architecture and urban planning, and also into many other design fields. As such, his career served as both a chronicle of the key issues and critiques of the last half-century of planning and design, and undeniably, a seminal contributor to it. From Notes on the Synthesis of Form, his first book and Harvard Ph.D. thesis, to the landmark “A City is Not a Tree,” to the best-sellers A Pattern Language and The Timeless Way of Building, to his more difficult and controversial magnum opus, The Nature of Order, Alexander has left a body of work whose breadth and depth is only now coming into view. Yet Alexander’s legacy is also the subject of intense debate and critique within the planning and design fields. The purpose of this thematic issue, then, is to provide greater clarity on where Alexander’s contribution is substantial, and where there are documented gaps and remaining challenges. Most importantly, the thematic issue aims to identify fruitful avenues for further research and development, taking forward some of the more promising but undeveloped insights of this seminal 20th-century thinker.


Instructions for Authors:
Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's instructions for authors and submit their abstracts (maximum of 250 words, with a tentative title) through the abstracts system (here). When submitting their abstracts, authors are also asked to confirm that they are aware that Urban Planning is an open access journal with a publishing fee if the article is accepted for publication after peer-review (corresponding authors affiliated with our institutional members do not incur this fee).


Open Access:
The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio's Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal's open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

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Volume 8, Issue 4

Title:
Planning, Manufacturing, and Sustainability: Towards Green(er) Cities Through Conspicuous Production


Editor(s):
Yonn Dierwechter (University of Washington) and Mark Pendras (University of Washington)

Submission of Abstracts: 1-15 December 2022
Submission of Full Papers: 15-30 April 2023
Publication of the Issue: October/December 2023

Information:

In the post-industrial world of urban redevelopment, manufacturing and other industrial activities have typically been relegated to the urban margins, if not ‘offshored’ entirely in the now familiar global divisions of labour. Pushed out of sight and out of mind by modernist zoning practices designed to protect more privileged land uses, the contributions of manufacturing to urban vitality have, until recently, been forgotten and/or overlooked by planners and development practitioners seeking to cash in on post-industrial momentum. However, this is now changing (e.g., Ferm et al, 2020; Nawratek, 2017). New examples of ‘conspicuous production’ (Baker, 2017) signal a potential turning of the tide. Following Karl Baker’s (2017) original suggestion, making production conspicuous means weaving manufacturing back into the fabric of the city, bringing visibility and proximity to the sector in ways that open space for engagement, attention, and support. Within this policy context and spatial reorientation, this issue looks thematically at planning for, with, and/or through manufacturing as a critical new form of green urbanism, building on and extending ideas advanced recently in this journal by authors in “Future Commercial and Industrial Areas” (Vol. 6, No. 3, 2021) as well as by the two guest editors organized under the theme of “keeping blue collars in green cities” (see, e.g., Dierwechter, 2013, 2021; Dierwechter & Pendras, 2020; Pendras & Williams, 2021). In addition to asking how to make urban-based manufacturing greener, this thematic issue specifically explores how emerging efforts to retain (and expand) manufacturing in so-called ‘post-industrial societies’ are now helping cities and city-regions to be greener and more climate friendly by situating production not as a problem to be overcome but rather as an important component of urban sustainability. The papers collectively will explore how planning systems in different settings are both adapting to and accelerating this possibility.

References:

Baker, K. (2017). Conspicuous production: Valuing the visibility of industry in urban re-industrialisation. In K. Nawratek (Ed.), Urban re-industrialization (pp. 117-126). Punctum Books.

Dierwechter, Y. (2013). Smart city-regionalism across Seattle: Progressing transit nodes in labor space? Geoforum, 49(0), 139-149.

Dierwechter, Y. (2021). Climate change and the future of Seattle. Anthem.

Dierwechter, Y., & Pendras, M. (2020). Keeping blue collars in green cities: From TOD to TOM? Frontiers in Sustainable Cities, 2(7).

Ferm, J., Panayotopoulos-Tsiros, D., & Griffiths, S. (2021). Planning urban manufacturing, industrial building typologies, and built environments: Lessons from Inner London. Urban Planning, 6(3), 350-367.

Nawratek, K. (Ed.). (2017). Urban re-industrialization. Punctum Books.

Pendras, M., & Williams, C. (2020). Secondary cities: Exploring uneven development in dynamic urban regions of the Global North. Bristol University Press.


Instructions for Authors:
Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's instructions for authors and submit their abstracts (maximum of 250 words, with a tentative title) through the abstracts system (here). When submitting their abstracts, authors are also asked to confirm that they are aware that Urban Planning is an open access journal with a publishing fee if the article is accepted for publication after peer-review (corresponding authors affiliated with our institutional members do not incur this fee).


Open Access:
The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio's Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal's open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

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Volume 8, Issue 4

Title:
Improvisation, Conviviality, and Conflict in Everyday Encounters in Public Space


Editor(s):
Mervyn Horgan (University of Guelph) and Saara Liinamaa (University of Guelph)

Submission of Abstracts: 1-15 March 2022
Submission of Full Papers: 15-31 October 2022
Publication of the Issue: October 2023

Information:

Existing research on encounters in urban spaces treats seriously everyday experiences, improvisations, and negotiations between strangers, where identities are produced, affirmed, and/or negated, and where differences are highlighted, assumed, and/or ignored. Recently there has been an explosion of (mostly Western-focused) research on conviviality in everyday urban life (Germain, 2013; Radice, 2016; Vigneswaran, 2014; Wise & Velayutham, 2009, 2014). This ‘convivial turn’ (Neal et al., 2013) is inspired by Gilroy’s (2005, p. xv) positioning of conviviality as centrally concerned with “processes of cohabitation and interaction that have made multiculture an ordinary feature of social life.” Convivialities research provides insights into everyday collective life, with many studies providing a valuable counterweight to the ‘vast sociology of hopelessness’ (Hall & Smith 2014). Make no mistake, though, this is no panacea. Simultaneously, research attunes us to the bubbling up of new forms of conflict, and the consolidation of old forms of marginalization. As Back and Sinha (2016, p. 517) note, we must attend to the “paradoxical co-existence of both racism and conviviality in city life.”

For this thematic issue, we invite papers that explore varieties of co-existence amongst strangers expressed in and through everyday encounters—improvised, convivial, conflictual, or otherwise—in urban public spaces. We welcome research that takes seriously the challenge of treating everyday public space as a domain where strangers encounter one another. Contributions work with and/or against the convivial turn, whether to identify and address, expose and challenge, and/or expand and surpass its limits and possibilities. We especially welcome research working at the conceptual boundaries of the convivial turn in one or more of the following ways: (1) by elaborating concepts/cases that make trouble for research on conviviality in urban public space; (2) by examining how urban public spaces facilitate or hinder improvisation in interactions between strangers; and (3) by engaging with potentially overlooked intersections between conviviality and adjacent concepts including but not limited to sociability, (in)civility, interdependence, solidarity, reciprocity, mutuality, and superdiversity.


Instructions for Authors:
Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's instructions for authors and submit their abstracts (maximum of 250 words, with a tentative title) through the abstracts system (here). When submitting their abstracts, authors are also asked to confirm that they are aware that Urban Planning is an open access journal with a publishing fee if the article is accepted for publication after peer-review (corresponding authors affiliated with our institutional members do not incur this fee).


Open Access:
The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio's Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal's open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

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Volume 8, Issue 4

Title:
Between the “Structural” and the “Everyday”: Bridging Macro and Micro Perspectives in Comparative Urban Research


Editor(s):
Sophie Schramm (TU Dortmund) and Nadine Appelhans (TU Berlin)

Submission of Abstracts: 1-15 December 2022
Submission of Full Papers: 15-30 April 2023
Publication of the Issue: October/December 2023

Information:
For informed decision-making, cities can gain from understanding their position within a larger network of cities. For a long time, however, comparison in urban studies (such as the world city hypothesis or the global city discussion) focused on comparison of global economic performance and failed to include a large number of cities as subjects of comparison, that did not comply with the limited scope of comparative criteria. These limited scopes of comparative criteria have been criticized, yet it remains somewhat unclear how they can be overcome methodologically and made inclusive to the full global scope of cities and themes of comparison. This is mostly due to the fact that different approaches exist in urban research that are often framed as opposed to each other or even mutually exclusive. One is the approach to study cities from a macro-perspective, to examine the broader structures, be they economic forces, technological innovations, or social changes as explanatory factors for the evolution of cities and regions. This approach lends itself for comparative research as it identifies broader trends that might have similar impacts in different places. Another approach to understanding cities is to study them from the bottom-up, focusing on everyday experiences and practices of actors in shaping urban life and form. Related methods lend themselves to understand the particular, place-specific characteristics that make every city unique.

 

 

We consider cities as complex relational entities that are shaped by an interplay between broader structural configurations and dynamics and local practices and activities (cf. Kihato, 2013). We therefore argue that approaches with a focus on structural dynamics and everyday practices can not only be merged but they should also be combined for a better understanding of cities. However, this combination of perspectives poses methodological challenges, particularly in terms of research comparing cities, as the description of the internal interplay needs to be abstract without losing the specificities. Our aim for this thematic issue is to accept this challenge and to discuss methods that bridge the divide between approaches focusing on the “structural” on the one hand and the “everyday” on the other, while being able to place individual urban accounts within the larger realm of city-systems.

We invite contributions focusing on one or more of the following questions:

  1. Which particular methods, sets of methods, and research designs lend themselves to understanding cities through everyday practices as well as structural forces?
  2. Which methods allow comparative urban research that pays attention to the common trends as well as to the particularities of cities?
  3. What are suggestions for expanding criteria of urban comparison and proposals for heterodox descriptions of city-networks?

References:

Appelhans, N. (2017). Urban planning and everyday urbanisation: A case study of Bahir Dar, Ethiopia. Transcript.

Healey, P. (2012). The universal and the contingent: Some reflections on the transnational flow of planning ideas and practices. Planning Theory, 11(2), 188–207.

Kihato, C. W. (2013). Migrant women of Johannesburg: Everyday life in an in-between city. Palgrave Macmillan.

Nijman, J. (2007). Introduction: Comparative urbanism. Urban Geography, 28(1), 1–6.

Robinson, J. (2011). Cities in a world of cities: The comparative gesture. International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, 35(1), 1–23.

Schramm, S., & Ibrahim, B. (2019). Hacking the pipes: Hydro-political currents in a Nairobi housing estate. Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space, 39(2), 354-370.


Instructions for Authors:
Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's instructions for authors and submit their abstracts (maximum of 250 words, with a tentative title) through the abstracts system (here). When submitting their abstracts, authors are also asked to confirm that they are aware that Urban Planning is an open access journal with a publishing fee if the article is accepted for publication after peer-review (corresponding authors affiliated with our institutional members do not incur this fee).


Open Access:
The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio's Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal's open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

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Volume 9, Issue 1

Title:
Citizen Participation, Digital Agency, and Urban Development


Editor(s):
Simone Tappert (University of Applied Sciences Northwestern Switzerland), Asma Mehan (Texas Tech University), Pekka Tuominen (University of Helsinki), and Zsuzsanna Varga (University of Glasgow)

Submission of Abstracts: 15-31 October 2022
Submission of Full Papers: 15-30 April 2023
Publication of the Issue: January/March 2024

Information:
Today’s exponential advancement of information and communication technologies is reconfiguring participatory urban development practices. Citizen participation, defined as an interdisciplinary and multi-stakeholder approach, emphasises the role of people and their knowledge in creating cities’ futures. The use of digital technology implies new forms of decentralized governance, collaborative production of knowledge, and social activism leading to new paradigms such as radical openness, connected intelligence, and crowdsourced deliberation. Social media, digital mapping, e-participation platforms, and location-based games are examples of such technologies.

Digital technologies are considered as a crucial building block for enhancing the potentially deliberative quality of participatory processes and for tackling historical shortcomings in such processes. As such, they carry the promise to enable a “more communicative action-oriented process of planning and city creation” (Houghton et al., 2015). However, digitalization also poses challenges and problems. In a society of access, where being connected is crucial, already existing inequalities and segregation can be perpetuated or even attenuated. Moreover, old problems related to citizen participation still occur in digital initiatives. Digital tools are not unbiased, but programmed and developed by human beings and their norms, values, and beliefs.

In this thematic issue we are especially interested in the trajectories and (dis)continuities of citizen participation through different tools and means. The issue will focus on how they have opened up novel approaches to mobilizing resources, addressing target groups, creating visibility and publicness, or enhancing participation through hybrid and multi-sensory approaches, and how they potentially affect, transform, contest, or reproduce hegemonic power relations.


Instructions for Authors:
Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's instructions for authors and submit their abstracts (maximum of 250 words, with a tentative title) through the abstracts system (here). When submitting their abstracts, authors are also asked to confirm that they are aware that Urban Planning is an open access journal with a publishing fee if the article is accepted for publication after peer-review (corresponding authors affiliated with our institutional members do not incur this fee).


Open Access:
The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio's Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal's open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

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Volume 9, Issue 1

Title:
Co-Production in the Urban Setting: Fostering Definitional and Conceptual Clarity Through Comparative Research


Editor(s):
Dahae Lee (TU Dortmund), Patricia Feiertag (TU Dortmund), and Lena Unger (TU Dortmund)

Submission of Abstracts: 1-15 January 2023
Submission of Full Papers: 15-31 May 2023
Publication of the Issue: January/March 2024

Information:

Cities change and face various challenges that are increasingly complex, intractable, persistent, and not amenable to simple solutions. What is more, when governments prove to be incapable of being the only possible supplier of public goods and services, collaborative forms of public service delivery gain significance. This phenomenon is known as co-production and refers to the collaboration between service professionals and users in the design and delivery of public goods and services. Co-production also represents an increasingly apparent mode of engagement with public agencies. Underlying co-production is the idea that networks of public, private, and non-public organisations and partnerships with citizens can increase context-specific and effective solutions while maintaining the public values. Although co-production has often been associated with the delivery of public goods and services, at its core it remains a concept that refers to all phases of delivery processes: co-planning (co-design), co-testing, co-financing, and co-evaluation. Thereby, it aims to create win-win situations that are beneficial for all as cities adapt, transition, or transform into more sustainable and desirable futures.

As interest in co-production grows, however, so does the sense of unclarity for the concept. This unclarity might be rooted in a spectrum of participants or be reflective of the diverse phases of the processes co-production features. Following the argument that this lack of clarity requires attention, this thematic issue seeks to foreground methodologically comparative approaches to study co-production as a way to sharpen understandings and definition of differences and commonalities that might enhance the concept of co-production. These can include, but are not limited to, frameworks and heuristics covering intra-, cross-case variations in single or multiple case studies. To illustrate, distinguishing or discussing actors, modes, or phases of co-productive processes could be points of entry for such comparative insights.


Instructions for Authors:
Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's instructions for authors and submit their abstracts (maximum of 250 words, with a tentative title) through the abstracts system (here). When submitting their abstracts, authors are also asked to confirm that they are aware that Urban Planning is an open access journal with a publishing fee if the article is accepted for publication after peer-review (corresponding authors affiliated with our institutional members do not incur this fee).


Open Access:
The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio's Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal's open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

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Volume 9, Issue 1

Title:
Urban Borderlands: Difference, Inequality, and Spatio-Temporal In-Betweenness in Cities


Editor(s):
Deljana Iossifova (University of Manchester) and David Kostenwein (ETH Zurich)

Submission of Abstracts: 15-30 September 2022
Submission of Full Papers: 15-31 March 2023
Publication of the Issue: January/March 2024

Information:

Cities in the Global North and South are marked by rapid socio-spatial transformation stemming from socioeconomic, environmental, and cultural transitions. The result is often socio-spatial fragmentation, frequently produced by the processes of urban planning and governance. In this thematic issue, contributions are concerned with the nature of planned urban borderlands as spaces of spatio-temporal in-betweenness signifying difference and inequality.

We understand difference across and inclusive of its multiple and intersecting domains, among them species, class, caste, race, gender, age, socio-economic status, ethnicity, or religion. Similarly, we embrace definitions of inequality along the lines of, for instance, spatial, social, economic, educational, or infrastructural. We are particularly interested in the spaces of spatio-temporal in-betweenness (urban borderlands; Iossifova, 2015) that the convergence of difference and inequality produces. These are the physical spaces in-between differently characterized fragments of the city that may exist only for a short time as the city ‘develops’ and transforms, or the physical spaces in-between such fragments that remain permanently to remind us of the differences that produced them.

We are interested in the production of such borderlands, and particularly in the role that architectural, planning, or governance practices play in the (re)production of these spaces across time and space. We also invite contributions that discuss—even suggest—alternatives to the usually crippling effect of such spaces on human health and wellbeing as well as socio-ecological sustainability. We invite contributions from across the spectrum of disciplinary fields and/or professional practice.


Instructions for Authors:
Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's instructions for authors and submit their abstracts (maximum of 250 words, with a tentative title) through the abstracts system (here). When submitting their abstracts, authors are also asked to confirm that they are aware that Urban Planning is an open access journal with a publishing fee if the article is accepted for publication after peer-review (corresponding authors affiliated with our institutional members do not incur this fee).


Open Access:
The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio's Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal's open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

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Volume 9, Issue 2

Title:
Post-Socialist Neoliberalism and the Production of Space


Editor(s):
Gabriel Schwake (The University of Sheffield) and Aleksandar Staničić (TU Delft)

Submission of Abstracts: 1-15 December 2022
Submission of Full Papers: 15-30 September 2023
Publication of the Issue: April/June 2024

Information:
During the past five decades, the neoliberal market economy became one of the most influential forces in the process of spatial production, transforming cities worldwide by succumbing them to the rationale of global finance. In a world where religions and ideologies continue to lose their influence, the power of money became an adequate substitute (Curtis, 2021). The global nature and overarching impact of neoliberalism made it the research focus of a vast cohort of urban and architectural scholars, historians, theoreticians, geographers, and economists, leading to a significant body of literature that discusses the relationship between the market economy and the built environment. It has been recognized that neoliberalism influences all spatial scales, from transnational landscapes to the layout of individual housing units, leading to a new global uniformity (Rolnik, 2019). As Peck et al. (2013, p. 1093) have argued, “neoliberalization is never found alone,” and it is persistently confronted with various local forces which are relevant to the “contextually specific histories of institutional organization.” Among these local forces, according to Harvey (2005), are the pre-war economic elites that are attempting to reclaim their former financial power by reducing the control of the state, as seen in the economic reformations of the 1970s. However, while this might be accurate to the so-called ‘Western world,’ where pre-war elites indeed existed, this thematic issue focuses on post-socialist contexts that lacked an old financial class, and rather comprised other hegemonic groups such as party officials, unions, and military officers.

Accordingly, this issue of Urban Planning challenges the common perception of neoliberalism as a post-Fordist Keynesian phenomenon. It asks to frame the concept of post-socialist neoliberalism, focusing on the transition from a state-led (or party-led) economy to a market-led one while examining how this influenced the formation of regions, cities, and buildings. We invite scholars interested in developing the framework of post-socialist neoliberalism through place-based analyses of market-oriented urban development and architecture in various global contexts. Authors are encouraged to present research that challenges the conventional understanding of neoliberalism, illustrating the unique circumstances of post-socialism and the manner in which it influences not only urban spaces, but also transnational landscapes, individual buildings, and dwelling units.

References:

Curtis, A. (2021). Can’t get you out of my head [BBC mini-series]. BBC. https://thoughtmaybe.com/cant-get-you-out-of-my-head

Harvey, D. (2005). A brief history of neoliberalism. Oxford University Press.

Peck, J., Theodore, N., & Brenner, N. (2013). Neoliberal urbanism redux? International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, 37(3), 1091-1099.

Rolnik, R. (2019). Urban warfare: Housing under the empire of finance. Verso.


Instructions for Authors:
Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's instructions for authors and submit their abstracts (maximum of 250 words, with a tentative title) through the abstracts system (here). When submitting their abstracts, authors are also asked to confirm that they are aware that Urban Planning is an open access journal with a publishing fee if the article is accepted for publication after peer-review (corresponding authors affiliated with our institutional members do not incur this fee).


Open Access:
The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio's Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal's open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

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Volume 9, Issue 2

Title:
Housing Norms and Standards: The Design of Everyday Life


Editor(s):
Sam Jacoby (Royal College of Art) and Seyithan Ozer (Royal College of Art)

Submission of Abstracts: 1-15 June 2023
Submission of Full Papers: 15-31 October 2023
Publication of the Issue: April/June 2024

Information:

Housing design is greatly informed by social and cultural norms or expectations around home use and everyday life. This thematic issue examines the interrelationships between social norms, cultural expectations, home use, everyday life, and lived experiences to technical housing standards and design outcomes. It is interested in how a socio-technical discourse can produce new insights, evidence, or analytical frameworks for housing and design research studies.

During the first half of the twentieth century, the use and space of homes were extensively studied, with analysis frequently combining design research, qualitative, and statistical methods. These studies became formative to technical standards, design companions, and typical design solutions that determined the way housing is designed and delivered. For example, graphical and dimensional methods of assessing plan layouts based on furniture and movement requirements are still in use today as part of space standards to regulate minimum dwelling sizes, dimensions, and functionality.

Interactions between norms and standards are contextual to different periods, regions, and cultures. How domestic practices and uses become normative and translated into technical standards can thus greatly vary. While housing priorities and lifestyles continuously change, significant historical events have often acted as a catalyst to long-term transformations in housing policy, design, and expectations. The COVID-19 pandemic and its lived experience at home is such an event, which has profoundly challenged existing notions of domesticity and dwelling functionality or usability. World War II and post-war public housing programmes or the fall of communism and the rise of housing marketisation are other historical examples.

This issue invites papers that can advance a new socio-technical discourse through a study of technical housing standards and the lived experience or changes in socio-cultural norms that challenge them.


Instructions for Authors:
Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's instructions for authors and submit their abstracts (maximum of 250 words, with a tentative title) through the abstracts system (here). When submitting their abstracts, authors are also asked to confirm that they are aware that Urban Planning is an open access journal with a publishing fee if the article is accepted for publication after peer-review (corresponding authors affiliated with our institutional members do not incur this fee).


Open Access:
The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio's Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal's open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

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Volume 9, Issue 2

Title:
Urban Shrinkage, Degrowth, and Sustainability: How Do They Connect in Urban Planning?


Editor(s):
Marco Bontje (University of Amsterdam), Maurice Hermans (Maastricht University), Joop de Kraker (Maastricht University), and Christian Scholl (Maastricht University)

Submission of Abstracts: 15-31 January 2023
Submission of Full Papers: 15-31 October 2023
Publication of the Issue: April/June 2024

Information:
In this thematic issue we want to connect two critiques of the unsustainable but dominant growth paradigm in urban development and planning, that so far were hardly combined: the degrowth debate and the debate about planning in cities facing structural shrinkage.

 

Urban shrinkage has affected an increasing amount of cities and towns in the past decades and has attracted increasing interest of urban studies scholars as well as urban policy-makers. Urban shrinkage can have several causes, but most often is rooted in structural economic crisis, resulting in population decline, vacant and decaying buildings, and underused infrastructure. While some cities manage to return to a growth path after shrinkage, most may have to prepare for further shrinkage or stabilisation instead. Generally, the urban shrinkage discourse advocates a departure from the dominant growth paradigm, and policy advice focuses on adapting to shrinkage rather than a forced attempt to return to growth (e.g., Hospers, 2014; Mallach et al., 2017; Wiechmann & Bontje, 2015). However, this is easier said than done: both academics and policy-makers still struggle with how to revitalise shrinking cities sustainably in the absence of growth (Liu, 2020). Yet, given the current trends of urbanization and demographic change, this issue has global relevance (Jarzebski et al., 2021).

In the early 21st century, the “limits to growth” debate of the 1970s revived under the radical header of “degrowth.” The degrowth movement aims for fundamental changes in economic and political systems and societies to reduce resource and energy use and achieve a sustainable society. Degrowth offers a critical perspective on the exploitative and destructive nature of the global capitalist system. Instead, societies should prioritise social and ecological well-being (D’Alisa et al., 2014; Kallis et al., 2018). So far, the main protagonists in the degrowth debate are academics and environmental activists, but degrowth has yet to become a prominent discourse in urban planning. According to Lehtinen (2018, p. 44), growth is still the primary objective in urban planning, though in a highly selective form: favouring concentrations of population and consumption. Several recent publications call for developing a degrowth research and policy agenda in urban planning (e.g., Brokow-Loga & Eckardt, 2020; Ferreira & Von Schönfeld, 2020; Savini, 2021; Xue, 2021). However, concrete examples of degrowth-based urban planning strategies, let alone their practical implementation, are still lacking.

Urban shrinkage and degrowth thinking seem to have much to offer to each other. Could degrowth be an inspiring and guiding new urban planning paradigm for the sustainable development of shrinking cities? Could shrinking cities be relevant testing grounds to make degrowth’s idealistic principles work in planning practice? This thematic issue aims to bring together novel empirical contributions taking stock of first attempts to connect degrowth to urban shrinkage, exploring in how far this potential unfolds in practice and what obstacles these attempts face. Contributions are asked to address at least one of the following questions:

 - When, why, and how do cities and local planning departments implement post-growth approaches? In how far do these approaches reflect degrowth principles? And can the results be considered sustainable?

- When, why, and how do degrowth ambitions get embedded in broader strategic frameworks for urban planning?

- What obstacles do urban planners and policymakers encounter when trying to mobilize degrowth approaches (Lamker, 2021; Lamker & Schulze Dieckhoff, in press)?

- How would a degrowth strategy for a shrinking city look like? And how useful are recent urban degrowth-based planning proposals for shrinking cities?

- Are there examples of degrowth-like practices or implemented degrowth-like proposals in shrinking cities, and what can we learn from them about the potential of degrowth principles?

References:

Brokow-Loga, A., & Eckardt, F. (2020). Postwachstumsstadt. Konturen einer solidarischen Stadtpolitik. Oekom.

D’Alisa, G., Demaria, F., & Kallis, G. (Eds.). (2014). Degrowth: A vocabulary for a new era. Routledge.

Ferreira, A., & von Schönfeld, K. (2020). Interlacing planning and degrowth scholarship. A manifesto for an interdisciplinary alliance. disP: The Planning Review, 56(1), 53-64.

Hospers, G. J. (2014). Policy responses to urban shrinkage: From growth thinking to civic engagement. European Planning Studies, 22(7), 1507-1523.

Jarzebski, M. P., Elmqvist, T., Gasparatos, A., Fukushi, K., Eckersten, S., Haase, D., Goodness, J., Khoshkar, S., Saito, O., Takeuchi, K., Theorelll, T., Dong, N., Kasuga, F., Watanabe, R., Sioen, G. B., Yokohari, M., & Pu, J. (2021). Ageing and population shrinking: Implications for sustainability in the urban century. npj Urban Sustainability, 1(1), Article 17.

Kallis, G., Kostakis, V., Lange, S., Muraca, B., Paulson, S., & Schmelzer, M. (2018). Research on degrowth. Annual Reviews of Environment and Resources, 43, 291-316.

Lamker, C. W. (2021). Becoming a post-growth planner. Rooilijn. https://www.rooilijn.nl/artikelen/becoming-a-post-growth-planner

Lamker, C. W., & Schulze Dieckhoff, V. (in press). Becoming a post-growth planner: Inner obstacles to changing roles. In F. Savini, A. Ferreira, & K. C. von Schönfeld (Eds.), Post-growth planning: Cities beyond the market economy. Routledge.

Lehtinen, A. A. (2018). Degrowth in city planning. Fennia, 196(1), 43-57.

Liu, R. (2020). Strategies for sustainability in shrinking cities: Frames, rationales and goals for a development path change. Nordia Geographical Publications, 49(5), 49-74.

Mallach, A., Haase, A., & Hattori, K. (2017). The shrinking city in comparative perspective: Contrasting dynamics and responses to urban shrinkage. Cities, 69, 102-118.

Savini, F. (2021). Towards and urban degrowth: Habitability, finity and polycentric autonomism. Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space, 53(5), Article 0308518X20981391.

Wiechmann, T., & Bontje, M. (2015). Responding to tough times: Policies and planning strategies in shrinking cities. European Planning Studies, 23(1), 1-11.

Xue, J. (2021). Urban planning and degrowth: A missing dialogue. Local Environment. https://doi.org/10.1080/13549839.2020.1867840


Instructions for Authors:
Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's instructions for authors and submit their abstracts (maximum of 250 words, with a tentative title) through the abstracts system (here). When submitting their abstracts, authors are also asked to confirm that they are aware that Urban Planning is an open access journal with a publishing fee if the article is accepted for publication after peer-review (corresponding authors affiliated with our institutional members do not incur this fee).


Open Access:
The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio's Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal's open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

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Volume 9, Issue 3

Title:
Planning and Managing Climate and Energy Transitions in Ordinary Cities


Editor(s):
Agatino Rizzo (Luleå University of Technology), Aileen Aseron Espiritu (UiT The Arctic University of Norway), Jing Ma (Luleå University of Technology), Jannes Willems (University of Amsterdam), and Daan Bossuyt (Delft University of Technology)

Submission of Abstracts: 1-15 September 2023
Submission of Full Papers: 15-31 January 2024
Publication of the Issue: July/September 2024

Information:

Cities act as the territorial interfaces between social and planetary transformations. They are the centre for discussing, planning, and implementing climate (mitigation/adaptation) and energy (PV, hydrogen, etc.) transitions.

In this thematic issue, we aim to shed light on how these processes of transformation are dealt in so-called “ordinary” cities. The term “ordinary” cities has been suggested by urban theorist Jennifer Robinson (2005) to highlight the importance of studying urbanization processes in out-of-the centre, small- and medium-sized cities (e.g., in the Arctic and the Global South) that may have different conditions and capacities in dealing with the ensuing urban transitions.

Today, these ordinary towns are facing the massive challenge to transition to carbon-free/climate adaptive/positive energy cities in 30 or less years and meet the international obligations their respective countries have signed up to (e.g., Agenda 2030 and the Paris Agreement). Also, it is in ordinary towns where most of the world population lives and where the biggest impact of the abovementioned transitions will be accrued from.

As such, we aim to push for “ordinary” approaches to urban planning vis-à-vis climate, energy, and social challenges for harnessing diverse strategies to deal with socio-urban transformations. We welcome theoretically-informed, empirical, and comparative contributions of diverse methodological or ontological foundations on any of the following themes and questions:

- Which (new) capacities, relationships, and resources are present in “ordinary” cities in regard to climate and energy transitions?

- How do new forms of (collaborative) governance, such as co-design and living labs, play out in “ordinary cities”?

- How do “ordinary” cities translate (inter)national obligations and treaties to their urban governance?

- How does access to climate-proof infrastructures and positive energy cities play out along different dimensions, such as gender, ethnicity, and class, in “ordinary” cities?

- How can new inter- and trans-disciplinary methods help to better understand the challenges and opportunities as well as planning and managing the climate and energy transitions in “ordinary cities”?


Instructions for Authors:
Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's instructions for authors and submit their abstracts (maximum of 250 words, with a tentative title) through the abstracts system (here). When submitting their abstracts, authors are also asked to confirm that they are aware that Urban Planning is an open access journal with a publishing fee if the article is accepted for publication after peer-review (corresponding authors affiliated with our institutional members do not incur this fee).


Open Access:
The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio's Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal's open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

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Volume 9, Issue 3

Title:
Transformative Local Governments: Addressing Social Urban Challenges by Bringing People and Politics Together


Editor(s):
Jua Cilliers (University of Technology Sydney), Ana Maria Vargas Falla (Centre for Local Democracy, Sweden), Gareth Wall (University of Birmingham), and Paula Barros (Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais)

Submission of Abstracts: 1-15 September 2023
Submission of Full Papers: 15-31 January 2024
Publication of the Issue: July/September 2024

Information:
This thematic issue originates from the Local Democracy Academy 2022 (https://icld.se/en/kampanj/local-democracy-academy) and aims to provide a trans-disciplinary perspective and evidence-based case studies to help local governments better understand and respond to the needs of vulnerable groups. Local governments are the tier of government closest to people and therefore play a key role in answering to local needs and aspirations. However, local governments are often underfunded, leaving them inadequately or un-responsive to many. Accountability and communication pathways are also often poorly known by communities. Multiple factors, especially in the context of misinformation, are contributing to lack of confidence in local elected authorities. Lack of trust in democracy and its institutions threaten the possibility to address key social challenges such as segregation, climate change, gender and health inequity, increasing income inequality, among others. Thus, this issue will showcase best practices, case studies and innovations in the urban environment, capturing how to bring people and politics together in attempt to co-create solutions towards a sustainable and resilient urban future.


Instructions for Authors:
Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's instructions for authors and submit their abstracts (maximum of 250 words, with a tentative title) through the abstracts system (here). When submitting their abstracts, authors are also asked to confirm that they are aware that Urban Planning is an open access journal with a publishing fee if the article is accepted for publication after peer-review (corresponding authors affiliated with our institutional members do not incur this fee).


Open Access:
The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio's Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal's open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

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Volume 9, Issue 3

Title:
Industrial Heritage and Cultural Clusters: More Than A Temporary Affair?


Editor(s):
Uwe Altrock (University of Kassel) and Janet Merkel (TU Berlin)

Submission of Abstracts: 1-15 September 2023
Submission of Full Papers: 15-31 January 2024
Publication of the Issue: July/September 2024

Information:
The regeneration of former industrial sites has produced a great number of cultural clusters in many cities around the world. A number of factors spurred this development: the debate about the creative city, the abundance of neglected manufacturing buildings suitable for adaptive reuse, the affinity between creative industries and industrial heritage, the difficult legal situation related to a transformation of inner-city brownfield sites allowing for temporary approaches to adaptively reuse them, the attractiveness of cultural uses in the early stages of revitalizing brownfield sites, among others. In effect, vibrant and unique places that often play a considerable role in city tourism have emerged. Over time, not only was the apparent uniqueness and cultural diversity of the centers that emerged criticized for their potential contribution to the gentrification of entire neighborhoods, but it also became clear that many of them were merely banal business parks with a specific thematic profile. After a few years, they also had to give way in some cases to a profit-oriented subsequent use as a conventional city expansion site. Despite the great scholarly interest in creative quarters, their long-term perspectives in particular seem still unclear. For this purpose, this thematic issue welcomes articles that discuss the contribution of municipalities and other key actors to planning, managing, and consolidating the respective clusters. A possible focus can be placed on how cities balance the issues of industrial heritage and adaptive reuse, pro-actively revitalize derelict sites, consider the effects of revitalization for surrounding neighborhoods, and find ways to stabilize creative quarters in the long run. Comparative studies that analyze clusters across regions or countries are particularly welcome.


Instructions for Authors:
Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's instructions for authors and submit their abstracts (maximum of 250 words, with a tentative title) through the abstracts system (here). When submitting their abstracts, authors are also asked to confirm that they are aware that Urban Planning is an open access journal with a publishing fee if the article is accepted for publication after peer-review (corresponding authors affiliated with our institutional members do not incur this fee).


Open Access:
The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio's Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal's open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

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Volume 9, Issue 4

Title:
Housing Affordability Crisis: How Can We Address It?


Editor(s):
Ajay Garde (University of California, Irvine) and Qi Song (University of California, Irvine)

Submission of Abstracts: 1-15 December 2023
Submission of Full Papers: 15-30 April 2024
Publication of the Issue: October/December 2024

Information:

We live in a rapidly urbanizing world where many cities are facing a housing affordability crisis. There is a shortage of all types of housing and a severe shortage of affordable housing in urban areas. Housing affordability is context sensitive and dependent on the type of development and the jurisdiction, however, housing cost burden is distributed unevenly across households of different income and ethnicity. Addressing the housing needs of different types of households—from families with children to the elderly, and especially low-income households—is important for the planning and development of cities.

There is an ongoing debate on the barriers to housing supply. Several studies have examined regulatory barriers that contribute to housing shortage. Some researchers contend that the strictness of land use regulations, limited availability of developable land, and environmental laws are correlated with high housing prices. Others have explained that non-regulatory barriers and challenges, such as community opposition to higher-density housing projects as well as the cost and availability of labor and construction materials, also contribute to housing affordability crisis. Advocacy groups assert that housing is a human right. Given this, how might we address the housing affordability crisis?

Proposals are invited for a thematic issue of Urban Planning, a peer-reviewed open access journal, to explore the theme of housing affordability crisis. Researchers could, for instance, examine the following types of questions: What are the causes and consequences of housing affordability crisis? How might state laws and local government policies address the problem? Contributions also could be based on case studies that examine housing development projects and related concerns of loss of sense of place, gentrification, and displacement as well as apprehensions of projects’ impact on traffic, environmental quality, property value, and neighborhood character.


Instructions for Authors:
Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's instructions for authors and submit their abstracts (maximum of 250 words, with a tentative title) through the abstracts system (here). When submitting their abstracts, authors are also asked to confirm that they are aware that Urban Planning is an open access journal with a publishing fee if the article is accepted for publication after peer-review (corresponding authors affiliated with our institutional members do not incur this fee).


Open Access:
The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio's Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal's open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

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Volume 9, Issue 4

Title:
Children’s Wellbeing in the Post-Pandemic City: Design, Planning, and Policy Challenges


Editor(s):
Garyfallia Katsavounidou (Aristotle University of Thessaloniki) and Sílvia Sousa (University of Porto)

Submission of Abstracts: 1-15 December 2023
Submission of Full Papers: 15-30 April 2024
Publication of the Issue: October/December 2024

Information:
More than forty years later after Colin Ward wrote his ground-breaking The Child in the City(1978), children as citizens and as users of public spaces are still fundamentally unrecognized in the theory and practice of city design and planning, despite important political steps taken towards the inclusion of children’s welfare in urban interventions, such as the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC) and the Child-Friendly Cities initiative. This misrecognition has a negative impact, both on children and on cities. Children’s wellbeing is closely related to the urban environment in which they live and grow up. Cities provide the context that defines how children (and their families) experience everyday life. Physical design, planning decisions, and municipal policies all determine crucial aspects of children’s wellbeing, from affordances of play areas to safe routes to school. From an urban policy perspective, investing in children’s spaces is a major asset for luring families back to dense urban core districts, thus revitalizing them.

The discussion about children as users of the city is even more urgent at this moment, since the experience of lockdown during the COVID-19 pandemic has showed very vividly how important public urban spaces are to all citizens, children in particular. The closing down of play-spaces brought about the realization that urban space needs to be reshaped giving children equal share. Streets, sidewalks, public spaces are the “fourth environment” for kids growing up and should be designed as such. In many cities around the world, emergency responses to the pandemic have included giving priority to children as users of open spaces. Indeed, the pandemic has made visible the importance of designing urban neighborhoods, in their entirety, with children in mind, and not only spaces specifically designed for children.

The quest for a truly “childhood city” (Karsten, 2002) is still quite elusive, but of extreme urgency, if we are to escape the present-day domestication of play, children’s growing addiction to screens, and the resulting impact on children’s physical and mental health as well as the alarming disconnection of children from nature. As urban designers, we need to address children as citizens with equal rights (if the premises of UNCRC are to be realized) and at the same time make cities more livable for all. To do this, we need a holistic approach, a multi-scale coordinated effort, from the macroscale, policy level to the organization of districts and neighborhoods and the physical design of streets, school areas, and open spaces. As urbanization rates continue to soar, humanity’s own existence and survival in the age of the Anthropocene depends on how children will relate to cities. If they experience them as friendly, welcoming, and nature-inclusive, they will love them as adults—and this is what, ultimately, urban design should aim for.

Contributors are asked to address (one of) the following questions:

  • How do children experience the city?
  • How safely and independently can they get around?
  • Where can children play and gather? What is the role of play in the city?
  • Are children’s needs and opinions taken into account in urban design? How can children participate in the design process?
  • How can cities “use” children to their benefit to become more livable for all?

Both theoretical and case-study based approaches are welcome.


Instructions for Authors:
Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's instructions for authors and submit their abstracts (maximum of 250 words, with a tentative title) through the abstracts system (here). When submitting their abstracts, authors are also asked to confirm that they are aware that Urban Planning is an open access journal with a publishing fee if the article is accepted for publication after peer-review (corresponding authors affiliated with our institutional members do not incur this fee).


Open Access:
The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio's Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal's open access charges and institutional members can be found here.