Towards a Situational Understanding of Collective Learning: A Reflexive Framework

Open Access Journal | ISSN: 2183-7635

Article | Open Access

Towards a Situational Understanding of Collective Learning: A Reflexive Framework


  • Seppe De Blust Research Unit Planning and Development, Department of Architecture, KU Leuven, Belgium
  • Oswald Devisch Department of Architecture & Art, University of Hasselt, Belgium
  • Jan Schreurs Research Unit Planning and Development, Department of Architecture, KU Leuven, Belgium


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Abstract:  Based on an in-depth study of how socially innovative processes are collectively reinforced within two cases, this article builds a reflexive framework that conceptualizes socially innovative processes as situated trajectories of collective learning. The framework starts from three theories in the field of pedagogy and organisational studies that try to contextualise and operationalise how internal processes of learning, supportive relationships and external demands interrelate withinprocesses of collective learning. In line with the reflexive character of social innovation research, the article presents the framework as a means to give concrete answer on how socially innovative processes can be supported and how the dynamic character of their collective learning trajectories can be managed. The conclusion of this article further reflects on the importance of a situational and multi-layered understanding of collective learning for creating institutional support for socially innovative processes in planning and presents reflexive questions that can help external actors as planning practitioners to position themselves within this often messy and complex reality.

Keywords:  collective learning; reflexivity; situational understanding; socially innovative planning

Published:   24 January 2019


DOI: https://doi.org/10.17645/up.v4i1.1673


© Seppe De Blust, Oswald Devisch, Jan Schreurs. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits any use, distribution, and reproduction of the work without further permission provided the original author(s) and source are credited.