Climate Change and Security: Filling Remaining Gaps

Open Access Journal | ISSN: 2183-2463

Editorial | Open Access

Climate Change and Security: Filling Remaining Gaps


  • Yasuko Kameyama Social Systems Division, National Institute for Environmental Studies, Japan
  • Yukari Takamura Institute for Future Initiatives, The University of Tokyo, Japan


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Abstract:  As perception of climate change as a threat to humanity and to ecosystems grows, the rapidly growing literature increasingly refers to the notion of “climate change and security,” for which there is as yet no single agreed definition. Despite the extent of literature already published, there are at least three remaining gaps: (1) Added theoretical value: How does “climate change and security” differ from similar notions such as “climate crisis” and “climate emergency”? What theoretical gains can be made by securing against climate change? (2) Role of non-state actors: The traditional concept of security is tightly bound to the notion of national security, but the climate change and security discourse opens the door to the participation of non-state actors such as the business sector, local government, and citizens. How do they take part in ensuring security? (3) Regional imbalance: Most of the literature on climate change and security published so far comes from Europe and North America. As other regions, such as Asia, are just as affected, more voices should be heard from those regions. This issue aims to address some of these gaps. The nine articles in this issue address the notion of “climate change and security” through empirical work while theoretically contributing to several themes relating to the climate change and security discourse.

Keywords:  climate change; conflict; discourse; human security; management; risk; security

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DOI: https://doi.org/10.17645/pag.v9i4.4932


© Yasuko Kameyama, Yukari Takamura. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits any use, distribution, and reproduction of the work without further permission provided the original author(s) and source are credited.