Socio-Spatial Segregation and the Spatial Structure of ‘Ordinary’ Activities in the Global South

Open Access Journal | ISSN: 2183-7635

Article | Open Access

Socio-Spatial Segregation and the Spatial Structure of ‘Ordinary’ Activities in the Global South


  • Pablo Muñoz Unceta FabLab Barcelona, Institute for Advanced Architecture of Catalonia, Spain
  • Birgit Hausleitner Faculty of Architecture and the Built Environment, TU Delft, The Netherlands
  • Marcin Dąbrowski Faculty of Architecture and the Built Environment, TU Delft, The Netherlands


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Abstract:  

Planning practice in the Global South often defines a border between formal and informal developments ignoring the complex and nuanced reality of urban practices and, consequently, worsening segregation. This article proposes an alternative view of socio-spatial segregation that shifts the distinction between formal/informal towards one that emphasises access to opportunities and their relationship with the spatial structure of the city. Under this alternative framework, applied to the case of the Valle Amauta neighbourhood in Lima, Peru, we reflect on how socio-economic activities, shaped by spatial conditions and social practices, increase or reduce socio-spatial segregation. Our findings suggest that a shift towards strategies aimed at increasing accessibility to centrality, provided by the density of social and economic activities, could offer new opportunities for planning practice and theory in the Global South.


Keywords:  informality; Global South; segregation; spatial justice; urban morphology

Published:   31 August 2020


DOI: https://doi.org/10.17645/up.v5i3.3047


© Pablo Muñoz Unceta, Birgit Hausleitner, Marcin Dąbrowski. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits any use, distribution, and reproduction of the work without further permission provided the original author(s) and source are credited.