Non-War Activities in Cyberspace as a Factor Driving the Process of De-Bordering

Open Access Journal | ISSN: 2183-2463

Article | Open Access | Ahead of Print | Last Modified: 12 May 2022

Non-War Activities in Cyberspace as a Factor Driving the Process of De-Bordering


  • Dominika Dziwisz Institute of Political Science and International Relations, Jagiellonian University, Poland


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Abstract:  Whereas war is the continuation of politics by other means, a new space between diplomacy and open conflict is now becoming available for state and non-state actors, tempting them with the promise of achieving a strategic advantage over an opponent without risking the escalation of the conflict to the level of kinetic aggression. From that perspective, the ongoing shift of states and societies into cyberspace is becoming extremely interesting. As it blurs national borders, it offers an excellent dimension in which to exercise non-war activities, enabling reduction of kinetic aggression in the three basic dimensions of warfare (land, air, and sea) and providing new means of reaching one’s political objectives. The aim of this article is twofold. Firstly, it discusses the changing nature of borders and examines the impact of non-war doctrine on the functions played by national borders. Secondly, it analyzes how states utilize these activities to achieve political goals and gain strategic advantage over opponents, as well as to what extent they foster de-bordering.

Keywords:  borders; cybersecurity; de-bordering; grey-zone conflict; non-war; re-bordering

Published:   Ahead of Print

Issue:   Re-Visioning Borders: Europe and Beyond (Forthcoming)

DOI: https://doi.org/10.17645/pag.v10i2.5015


© Dominika Dziwisz. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits any use, distribution, and reproduction of the work without further permission provided the original author(s) and source are credited.