Conclusion: Out With the Old, In With the New? Explaining Changing EU–US Relations

Open Access Journal | ISSN: 2183-2463

Editorial | Open Access

Conclusion: Out With the Old, In With the New? Explaining Changing EU–US Relations


  • Akasemi Newsome Institute of European Studies, University of California – Berkeley, USA / Department of Organisation, Leadership and Management, Inland University of Applied Sciences, Norway
  • Marianne Riddervold Institute of European Studies, University of California – Berkeley, USA / Department of Organisation, Leadership and Management, Inland University of Applied Sciences, Norway


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Abstract:  This article summarizes the thematic issue findings, focusing on the factors that contribute to stabilize or weaken EU–US relations. Seen together, the articles have systematically documented that there is a growing pressure on transatlantic relations both in multilateral institutional settings as well as in foreign and security policy. On the one hand, transatlantic relations within NATO are strengthening in the context of Russia’s new war in Ukraine, pushing Europe closer to the US and papering over disputes among European nations about the course of intra-European security cooperation. Shared norms and institutions as well as non-state actors with an interest in keeping the relationship strong for economic, strategic, or more normative reasons also serve to stabilize the relationship. On the other hand, longer-term geopolitical and economical structural changes together with domestic factors, particularly in the US, and in some cases diverging interests, suggest a parallel longer-term weakening of the relationship.

Keywords:  domestic politics; European Union; interdependence; strategic interests; transatlantic relations; United States

Published:  


DOI: https://doi.org/10.17645/pag.v10i2.5650


© Akasemi Newsome, Marianne Riddervold. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits any use, distribution, and reproduction of the work without further permission provided the original author(s) and source are credited.