Social Inclusion is a quarterly peer-reviewed open access journal, which provides academics and policy-makers with a forum to discuss and promote a more socially inclusive society.

Open Access Journal | ISSN: 2183-2803

With our plurithematic issues we intended to draw the attention of researchers, policy-makers, scientists and the general public to some of the topics of highest relevance. Scholars interested in editing a themed issue of Social Inclusion are encouraged to contact the Editorial Office of the journal (si@cogitatiopress.com).

Published Themed Issues

Published issues are available here.

Upcoming Issues:

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Volume 5, Issue 4

Title: Multilingualism and Social Inclusion

Editors:

László Marácz
Faculty of Humanities, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Gumilyov Eurasian National University, Kazakhstan

Silvia Adamo
Faculty of Law, University of Copenhagen, Denmark

Deadline for Abstracts: 30 June 2017
Submission of Full Papers: 15 to 20 August 2017
Publication of the Issue: December 2017

Information: Linguistically diverse or multilingual societies are increasing world-wide. This has mainly to do with processes of globalization and Europeanization. Universal norms and standards in order to protect linguistic and cultural identity are spreading. This has led to the weakening of the traditional nation-state regime celebrating the ‘one nation-one people-one language’ ideology and has made possible the development of multilingual states. In this view, multilingualism can be seen as challenging the national social cohesion, which before in time was unquestioned. In many places, languages of traditional territorial minorities have been recognized and have received an official status - quite often next to the official language of the majority population – leading in some cases to new forms of governance, like autonomy, confederalization and consociational democracy. Furthermore, the proliferation of multilingualism is boosted by all sorts of forms of mobility, where mobility is understood as physical migration or new forms of virtual mobility connected to digital networks. Mobility in this sense supports the linguistic and transnational identity of migrants bringing with them new languages which cannot be assimilated into a host society. Finally, English is on the rise as a global lingua franca and some commentators consider the knowledge of global English as a prerequisite for a just world. The idea is that the more English leads to more social inclusion.

This thematic issue wants to address the apparent schism between multilingualism and social cohesion. One of the questions to analyse will be, under what circumstances and conditions a group being recognizable as a group sharing the same linguistic features is included or excluded from society. On the one side, exclusion might cause social, political, economic, or cultural drawbacks to all the societal actors involved. Fragmentarization and the development of parallel societies which is the result of social exclusion are a threat to social cohesion. On the other side, inclusion raises also other issues: if linguistic identity is preserved in accordance with universal norms and transnational identities how will social inclusion in a linguistically diverse society be realized? How are states and policy-making institutions facilitating linguistic diversity in all the various segments of society, such as in the legal framework defining the notion of citizenship, public administration, education, work place, health care, media and so on?

Contributions to the thematic issue can be elaborated on from an interdisciplinary perspective or restricted to one discipline only, like anthropology, economics, education sciences, communication studies, geography, linguistics, law, political and social sciences, history, public administration, European studies; and invited to explore, but are not restricted to, the following topics:

- Multilingualism and social inclusion, theoretical approach and definitions;
- Multilingualism and social inclusion in the context of education, communication, media, health care, work place, public spaces, public administration;
- Multilingualism and social inclusion: minority language speakers and majority language speakers, territorial linguistic minorities, migrants;
- Multilingualism and social inclusion: the role of different forms of mobility, including virtual mobility;
- Multilingualism and social inclusion: do speakers of global English have a better chance in order to be included socially?
- Multilingualism and social inclusion: the rise of universal norms and standards, linguistic human right;
- Multilingualism and social inclusion: how does language policy affect social inclusion?
- Multilingualism, and social inclusion: fault lines in society along the language dimensions;
- Multilingualism and social cohesion vis-à-vis new citizens/migrants;
- Multilingualism and social cohesion in the workplace;
- The European legal context and the value of multilingualism in creating social cohesion;
- Multilingualism and social inclusion: comparative studies between the EU, and other countries with a multilingual regime, including e.g. Canada, India, China, Russia or South-Africa.

Instructions for Authors: Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's editorial policies and to send their abstracts (about 200-250 words, with a tentative title) by email to the journal's editorial office (si@cogitatiopress.com) by 30 June 2017.

Open Access: The journal has an article processing charge to cover its costs, so authors are advised to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees, and if their institutions wish to join Cogitatio’s Membership Program (institutional members enable their authors to publish without having to incur any publication fees). Further information about the journal’s open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

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Volume 5, Issue 4

Title: Regional and Urban Mobility: Contribution to Social Inclusion

Editors: John Stanley (University of Sydney, Australia) and Janet Stanley (University of Melbourne, Australia)

Deadline for Abstracts: 31 March 2017
Submission of Full Papers: 15 to 30 June 2017
Publication of the Issue: November/December 2017

Information: This issue of the journal will seek contributions that explore the role that mobility, or the lack thereof, plays in social inclusion or exclusion in urban and regional areas. It will consider the way mobility enhancements can be shaped to promote inclusion. Topics may encompass:

- Transport disadvantage and connections to social inclusion/exclusion and wellbeing;
- The role of mobility in building social capital and strong communities, and how this can support social inclusion and wellbeing;
- Barriers to, and opportunities for, mobility enhancement for social inclusion;
- How institutional arrangements enhance or detract from socially inclusive mobility opportunities;
- Integrating mobility and non-transport solutions (e.g. Services provision) to resolve apparent mobility problems;
- Benefit/cost studies of mobility enhancements for social inclusion;
- The wider societal benefits which may arise from improvements in transport and the knock-on effects of social inclusion;
- The minimum requirements for public transport provision in varying settings;
- The organisation and integration of all transport modes, including breaking down barriers between freight and passenger transport;
- The place of local decision-making about transport, how this should be done and the boundaries of decision-making between community and the levels of government;
- New technologies for mobility, their social impacts and their consequences for social inclusion.

Instructions for Authors: Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's editorial policies and to send their abstracts (about 200-250 words, with a tentative title) by email to the journal's editorial office (si@cogitatiopress.com) by 31 March 2017.

Open Access: The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio’s Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal’s open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

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Volume 6, Issue 1

Title: Disability Equality: In Theory and Practice

Editors: Mark Priestley (University of Leeds, UK) and Lisa Waddington (Maastricht University, The Netherlands)

Deadline for Abstracts: 1 April 2017
Submission of Full Papers: 15 to 30 September 2017
Publication of the Issue: February/March 2018

Information: The focus of this thematic issue is on ‘disability equality’—as a multi-dimensional theoretical construct, as a tool for rights-based advocacy and as a framework for monitoring evidence of social inclusion.

Much has been written about the historic shift that has taken place in thinking about disability as a social issue over recent decades. The influence of ‘social model’ approaches has been immense in this respect, providing the analytical lens through which disability is now more often viewed as institutional discrimination and oppression than as individual deficit or personal tragedy. This transformation was inspired both by a critique of disabling barriers and by a vision of a more equal and inclusive society— a vision for ‘full participation and equality’.

The rights-based advocacy of disabled people’s movements has both inspired this way of thinking and given it focus through substantive claims to political and social equality. In the decade since implementation of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) the expectation that such claims exist ‘on an equal basis with others’ has been consolidated. At the same time, the evidence base has grown with an increase in equality monitoring of policies and outcomes for disabled persons.

Theorising within disability studies has continued to explore what disability, disablement or ableism means, and the multitude of ways in which it is experienced, but there is a need to reflect also on what ‘full participation and equality’ really means. How should we understand the concept of ‘disability equality’, how useful is it and how can it be assessed or measured? Ten years on from the CRPD what progress has been made towards disability equality, what remains to be done and how should we approach the task?

This issue is based on an open call for papers with an interdisciplinary scope to consider disability equality as, for example, equal recognition, equal treatment, equal access to resources and environments, or equality of outcomes. Both theoretical and empirical contributions are relevant to addressing this in local, national or international contexts.

Instructions for Authors: Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's editorial policies and to send their abstracts (about 200-250 words, with a tentative title) by email to the journal's editorial office (si@cogitatiopress.com) by 1 April 2017.

Open Access: The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio’s Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal’s open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

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Volume 6, Issue 1

Title: The Constitutive Powers of Migration: Refugees and the Transformation of Migration Societies

Editors: Ulrike Hamann and Gökçe Yurdakul (Humboldt University of Berlin, Germany)

Deadline for Abstracts: 15 July 2017
Submission of Full Papers: 15 to 30 November 2017
Publication of the Issue: March/April 2018

Information: Migration has deep impacts on social structures and socio-political power relations in departure, transit and arrival countries. Migrants and refugees contest and transform dominant notions of nation-state, state control, national sovereignty, citizenship, and participation. In migration processes, both newcomers and people already living in arrival societies may voice their concerns about equality and inclusion while renegotiating the meaning of national belonging and other forms of membership. Such processes bring up new possibilities of belonging, unexpected alliances between social actors and new definitions of who we are.

Our intent with this issue is to reflect on the intersecting social, economic, political and cultural dynamics that arise in sending, transit and arrival societies as a result of migration. We aim to learn from practices of solidarity and conviviality in order to better conceptualize inclusion in migration societies. Our focus lays on the challenges to and transformation of societies, which are as much shaped by migration regimes as by the struggles for social inclusion of migrants, refugees and solidarity movements.

The authors of the thematic issue will engage with topics such as:

- Discourses of the new right: the impact of (re)surfacing right-wing movements and right-wing politics in societies with a history of fascism, apartheid and/or colonialism;
- Inclusion and conviviality: practices of conviviality developed through migration;
- Contested concepts of inclusion and exclusion, such as citizenship, belonging and membership;
- Acts and structures of solidarities between citizens and non-citizens and their relation to state and supra-national institutions;
- Impacts and struggles of migrants and refugees on urban and rural space;
- Migrant and refugee movements: power and privilege within migrant and refugee movements;
- The impact of class, gender and race: possible transforming effects of migrant and refugee movements on global and local class structures and racialized relations;
- Narratives of migration: gendered, racialized and culturalized narratives of the nation. New/old collective identities as antagonistic to each other;
- Migrant and refugee narratives in the media as forms of knowledge production;
- The role of civil society: ambivalences of a transforming civil society in relation to state institutions, especially with acts of solidarity and hospitality;
- Divisions in civil society organizations and intensified political and policy based hostility.

Instructions for Authors: Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's editorial policies and to send their abstracts (about 200-250 words, with a tentative title) by email to the journal's editorial office (si@cogitatiopress.com) by 15 July 2017.

Open Access: The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio’s Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal’s open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

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Volume 6, Issue 2

Title: Complex Religion: Intersections of Religion and Inequality

Editor: Melissa J. Wilde (University of Pennsylvania, USA)

Deadline for Abstracts: 15 September 2017
Submission of Full Papers: 15 to 31 January 2018
Publication of the Issue: May/June 2018

Information: Although scholars of American religion acknowledge religion’s deep interconnectedness with race, class, and ethnicity in the USA, we nonetheless typically study religion as a factor that is independent from other social structures. Likewise, we rarely systematically examine class, race or gender differences between or within American religious groups. This thematic issue will highlight research that moves beyond these weaknesses by publishing papers that intentionally examine aspects of inequality as they relate to religion. Papers that discuss both theoretical and methodological conundrums (and solutions) are welcome.

Instructions for Authors: Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's editorial policies and to send their abstracts (about 200-250 words, with a tentative title) by email to the journal's editorial office (si@cogitatiopress.com) by 15 September 2017.

Open Access: The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio’s Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal’s open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

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Volume 6, Issue 2

Title: Global Perspectives on Disability

Editors: Shaun Grech (The Critical Institute, Malta) and Karen Soldatic (Western Sydney University, Australia)

Submission of Full Papers: 15 to 31 December 2017
Publication of the Issue: May/June 2018

Instructions for Authors: Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's editorial policies and to submit their full papers through the journal's online submission system.

Open Access: The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio’s Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal’s open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

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Volume 6, Issue 2

Title: The Incorporation of Highly-Skilled Workers in Immigrant Labour Markets

Editors: Neli Demireva (University of Essex, UK) and Ivana Fellini (University of Milano Bicocca, Italy)

Deadline for Abstracts: 15 December 2017
Submission of Full Papers: 15 to 31 January 2018
Publication of the Issue: May/June 2018

Information: Across the major immigrant societies of the original 15 European Union member states and Norway migrants and minorities still experience economic disadvantage. This failure of economic integration poses significant questions about the utilization of human capital, the management of mobility and the competitiveness of European labour markets (Cameron, 2011; OECD, 2016, 2017). This is particularly relevant as the EU competes with other major industrial economies such as the US, Canada and Australia for skilled workers. It is therefore crucial to study how well these skilled workers integrate on the labour market and whether the most is made of the human capital they bring. This collection of papers studies the individual and contextual factors that lead to better incorporation of skilled migrants.

Using a variety of datasets, this thematic issue pushes the debate forward in several ways. First, we consider the integration outcomes of both migrants and second generation minority members in comparison to majority members. Among migrants we differentiate between recent arrivals, who can be expected to face some disadvantage as they lack specific human capital, knowledge of the labour market and social networks upon which to rely when searching for work. This approach allows for a clear study of progress over time and generations. We can further study the extent to which different factors affect the gap relative to the majority directly, through interaction terms. Second, we consider labour market outcomes broadly: the probability of employment, but also tenure, transitions to unemployment and the probability of good jobs will be taken into account. This strengthens the understanding of hindrances experienced on the labour market and the interventions necessary to incorporate migrants and minorities further.

This thematic issue will build a picture of the factors associated with labour market disadvantage—particularly differential returns to foreign qualifications and educational credentials and differences between public and private sectors placements as relative gaps are expected to be smaller in the public sector and this could be a pathway to greater integration. All analysis will be performed separately by gender as processes are likely to differ. Where possible the papers in this collection will consider whether patterns changed since the financial crisis of 2008–2010. Finally, the papers collected in this volume use a variety of datasets to study this similar framework of labour market integration, allowing for a comparison among the major European receiving countries. This thematic issue can therefore help inform policies by providing a comprehensive picture of the labour market incorporation and the factors leading to it over different contexts of reception.
This approach has several strengths. It brings us closer to understanding the employment gaps between majority and minority populations, keeping in mind that such a comparison is crucial for understanding short and long-term integration. It allows us to analyse the observed associations not only among migrants but also majority and minority members. Importantly, the thematic issue considers the impact not only of individual factors on labour market integration but also takes different compositions over regions and countries into account.

References:

Cameron, D. (2011,  February 5). Speech at the Munich Security conference. Retrieved from www.number10.gov.uk/news/pms-speech-at-munich-security-conference
OECD. (2016). International migration outlook 2016. Paris: OECD Publishing.
OECD. (2017). International migration outlook 2017. Paris: OECD Publishing.

Instructions for Authors: Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's editorial policies and to send their abstracts (about 200-250 words, with a tentative title) by email to the journal's editorial office (si@cogitatiopress.com) by 15 December 2017.

Open Access: The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio’s Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal’s open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

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Volume 6, Issue 3

Title: Gender Equality and Beyond: At the Crossroads of Neoliberalism, Anti-Gender Movements, “European” Values, and Normative Reiterations in the Nordic Model

Editors: Lena Martinsson (University of Gothenburg, Sweden), Diana Mulinari (Lund University Sweden) and Katarina Giritli Nygren (Mid Sweden University, Sweden)

Deadline for Abstracts: 20 December 2017
Submission of Full Papers: 25 to 31 March 2018
Publication of the Issue: September 2018

Information: Gender equality today serves as a node for several contradictory and sometimes highly problematic norms and discourses. At the same time, the need to develop visions for how to challenge inequalities in a neo-liberal time is more urgent than ever.

Scholars have identified the emergence and establishment of “anti-gender”, or “anti-feminist” networks, organisations and social movements in many parts of the world, not least in Europe (Graff & Korolczuk, 2017; Kuhar & Zobec, 2017). Right-wing, xenophobic political parties and movements are on the rise and there is increasing resistance to abortion, gender equality, gender theory, same-sex marriage, gender studies and the state’s “intervention” in marriage and children’s education.

Meanwhile, through intersectional analyses, scholars have challenged and deconstructed discourses on Swedish gender equality and shown that they not only reiterate, and build upon, hetero-normative discourses and gender binary notions, but reproduce notions of Europe and the Nordic states as the crown of enlightenment and modernity, held up as an example for others to follow and assimilate (Martinsson, Griffin, & Giritli Nygren, 2016). These scholars have argued that while gender equality policies have been important, they have also served to normalise some lives, re-established differences and recreated Eurocentric, colonial and nationalistic stories (cf., Butler, 2004). The understanding of gender equality as something emanating from the West has both marginalized feminist struggles in other parts of the world and helped reinforce the fantasy that gender equality is Western framed by the privilege of whiteness.

Another relevant appropriation in this context of a shift from a social democratic towards a neo-liberal regime—understood here both as an economic frame and, more importantly, as a culture form and an emotional regime—is the transformation of articulation of gendered subjectivity. Gender equality and particularly success in the public sphere becomes possible through shifting care work towards migrant women workers.

Furthermore, scholars have shown how racist and right-wing movements have appropriated discourses on gender equality (Mulinari, 2016) and how gender equality has been used as an argument for closing the borders for refugees (Reimers & Martinsson, 2017; Youkhana & Sutter, 2017). Gender equality and diversity management has also merged with neo-liberal forces (Alnebratt & Rönnblom, 2016; de los Reyes, 2016; Giritli Nygren, Fahlgren, & Johansson, 2016). And finally, the Scandinavian model of gender equality, with its strong connection to a secular state and identity, has established and cemented the idea of religion as non-critical and traditional (cf., Asad 2009; Berg, Lundahl, & Martinsson, 2016; Mahmood, 2012).

Our aim with this issue is, firstly, to elaborate further on gender equality as a node for strong and often contradictory discourses. What does this affective messiness tell us, not only about gender equality, but about its transnational and national contexts and imagined communities? Secondly, while these anti-genderism, post colonialist (Spivak, 2012), femo-nationalist (Farris, 2017) and homo-nationalist (Puar, 2007) themes are very important topics for this issue we are also interested in articles that follow other processes and transformations that might be considered to be “beyond gender equality”. For instance, is it possible to discern different examples of decolonising struggles or articulations? Would it be possible to discuss the emergence of different gender equalities and different modernities (Cusicanqui, 2012) that, in a decolonial way, challenge Eurocentric reiterations of linearity which so often follow with this political work when it is performed in Europe (cf., Mignolo, 2012)? What sorts of concepts could possibly be developed in order to go beyond the problematic performativity which follows with gender equality? Are there concrete examples of what Paul Gilroy calls ‘conviviality’ (2004), a resilient way of living with differences and different sorts of equalities? For this issue, we welcome authors exploring these questions through studies on:

- gender equality as a node for different and contradictory struggles and discourses (hetero-normative, nationalistic, Eurocentric, Human rights, and anti-discrimination, etc.);
- gender equality, space and temporality (for example the South/North as well as the urban/rural divide reproduced through the norm of modernity);
- gender equality and its (dis)connections to a secular norm;
- gender equality and its (dis)connections to faith and religion;
- anti-genderism and gender equality;
- gender equality from a postcolonial perspective or decolonial ambition;
- gender equality and its (dis)connections to neo-liberalism;
- gender equality, neoliberalism and migrant labour;
- the connection between gender equality and national and transnational positions;
- the ongoing transformations and pluralisation of gender equality norms, discourses and notions;
- the role of the state and social movements in ongoing transformations or reproductions of gender equality norms and discourses;
- the radicalisation of gender equality through alliances with other movements (anti-racist, LGBTQ, etc.);
- gender equality and conviviality;
- conceptual and theoretical elaborations on any of these themes.

Instructions for Authors: Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's editorial policies and to send their abstracts (about 200-250 words, with a tentative title) by email to the journal's editorial office (si@cogitatiopress.com) by 31 December 2017.

Open Access: The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio’s Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal’s open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

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Volume 6, Issue 3

Title: Migration, Boundaries and Differentiated Citizenship

Editor: Terry Wotherspoon (University of Saskatchewan, Canada)

Deadline for Abstracts: 30 November 2017
Submission of Full Papers: 15 to 31 March 2018
Publication of the Issue: August/September 2018

Information: Contemporary migration across borders is beset by contradictory pressures and challenges. Populations displaced by economic change, environmental degradation, political instability, warfare, and violence coexist with knowledge workers, entrepreneurs and global citizens whose prospects for mobility are enhanced by desired skills, capital or other assets. Some populations are welcomed and favoured while others are resisted, discouraged, or disparaged. These differential capacities for mobility, citizenship and belonging intersect in complex ways with broader trends contributing to polarization of income, wealth and life chances. What do these relationships signify for the capacity of welfare states to address the well-being of populations? To what extent and in what ways are some populations excluded from social and economic opportunities and entitlements? What do these relationships reveal about the nature and status of nation-states in a global context?

This thematic issue highlights recent work that explores these issues and related matters associated with the impact that differential categories of citizenship and entitlement have for diverse populations. The issue will feature work that addresses particular forms of rights and limitations in conjunction with distinct status categories (e.g., immigrant, refugee, temporary or guest workers, and Indigenous populations) and conditions for exit or entry (as represented, for instance, in requirements and eligibility associated with different types of visas). Papers that focus on particular national and regional contexts are welcome, though some attention should be given to comparative dimensions.

Instructions for Authors: Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's editorial policies and to send their abstracts (about 200-250 words, with a tentative title) by email to the journal's editorial office (si@cogitatiopress.com) by 30 November 2017.

Open Access: The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio’s Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal’s open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

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Volume 6, Issue 3

Title: Vulnerable and Disadvantaged Groups: On the Margins of the Welfare State?

Editors: Inger Lise Skog Hansen and Tone Fløtten (Fafo Institute for Labour and Social Research, Norway)

Deadline for Abstracts: 31 December 2017
Submission of Full Papers: 15 to 31 March 2018
Publication of the Issue: August/September 2018

Information: This issue aims at drawing the attention to vulnerable (disadvantaged) groups with complex needs and how their needs are (or not) met in advanced welfare states. Advanced welfare states are often service intensive. Nevertheless, some groups seem to “fall between chairs” and are at risk of not receiving the services and support they need. As a consequence, they face marginalization. In contemporary welfare states the problem of permanent marginalization is high on the agenda, and the demand for social innovations in the service provision is acknowledged.

One common factor across marginalized groups is that individuals often face multiple problems and therefore have complex needs. The term “complex needs” indicate both breadth—more than one need as well as interconnected needs—, and depth—profound, serious or intense needs (Rosengard et al., 2007). Complex needs challenge the institutional framework of modern welfare services as these services are often specialized in different sectors and at different governmental levels. Furthermore, strict eligibility criteria are often formulated and persons with complex need do not necessarily fit these criteria.

An aim of the issue is to identify groups at risk of facing marginalization due to their complex needs within different welfare state regimes and contexts. A wide range of groups could be identified as having complex needs: we will call for papers on issues like child poverty, homelessness, immigration, youths not in employment, education or training (NEETs), drug addiction and mental health problems. Prostitutes and victims of trafficking may also be relevant groups to include. The issue will demonstrate the diversity of problems faced by modern welfare states and how different groups challenge traditional single service provision.

Papers must address challenges related to persons with complex needs and how they are met by the welfare services. We seek contributions that elaborate explanations of why people with complex needs face problems in getting the services and support they need. Empirical studies on municipal or local strategies to meet multiple or complex needs are welcomed. Trends of de-institutionalization and de-centralization of many services has placed local services as welfare providers under pressure. To be able to deliver coherent and coordinated services across different single issue services and governmental levels a reorganization of service provision may be needed.

We encourage authors to highlight service provision that has succeed in reaching out to people with complex needs, and to illuminate barriers and good practice in service provision. Empirical papers that expand our knowledge on best practices in local integrated services to persons with complex needs in risk of marginalization will be sought.

Instructions for Authors: Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's editorial policies and to send their abstracts (about 200-250 words, with a tentative title) by email to the journal's editorial office (si@cogitatiopress.com) by 31 December 2017.

Open Access: The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio’s Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal’s open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

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Volume 6, Issue 4

Title: Inequalities in Access to Higher Education: Methodological and Theoretical Issues

Editors: Gaële Goastellec (University of Lausanne, Switzerland) and Jussi Välimaa (University of Jyväskylä, Finland)

Deadline for Abstracts: 1 February 2018
Submission of Full Papers: 10 to 15 June 2018
Publication of the Issue: November/December 2018

Information: Over the last half century or so, higher education systems have shifted from being an exclusive good, reserved for a happy few (young men from the upper middle classes and bourgeoisie, capital cities and belonging to the ethnic majority) to being an inclusive good, accessible to women, lower middle classes, ethnic minorities and middle-size towns students (Goastellec, 2008). This transformation in the higher education scope came with the assumption that higher education access massification was reducing inequalities, if not erasing them. But although most Western higher education systems have now been massified for a few decades, inequalities appear to resist as well as to transform, becoming more qualitative, through a diversion process and due to emerging issues, such as for example refugee’s access to higher education (see, for e.g., Breanne, Nawyn, & Okwako, 2017; Dryden-Peterson Sarah, 2010; Jungblut & Pietliewicz, 2017). It also seems that we are facing increasing institutional stratification with elite universities selecting students mainly from the highest social strata. This global condition is called higher participation system of higher education (HPS; Cantwell, Marginson, & Smolentseva, in press).

In a HPS area, how are social inequalities in access to higher education and its degrees measured, explained and theorised? Which are the various approaches dealing with this issue? Some research has focused on the structural dimension of education, discussing the degree of massification for previous levels of schooling such as the Maximally Maintained Inequalities approach (MMI; Raftery & Hout, 1993) or the Equally Maintained Inequalities (EMI; Lucas, 2001), or on the structure of secondary education (Goastellec & Välimaa, 2017). Others have interrogated the choices made by students, analysing the educational paths followed and interrogating the educational choices (Pilote, Picard, Goastellec, Turcotte, & Olympio, 2014). Other streams of research questioned the effect of governing political parties (Jungblut, 2014) and welfare states (e.g., Pechar & Andes, 2011; Peter, Edgerton, & Roberts, 2010), the trade-off between educational policies and other social policies (Busemeyer & Nikolai, 2010), the hold of degrees on employment or more broadly the effect of admission criteria (Childs, Ferguson, Herbert, Broad, & Zhang, 2016), and institutional and national policies and educational markets.

What are the mechanisms behind inequalities in today HPSs and how can they be measured and explained? This thematic issue welcomes articles with a sociological, political, historical or economical perspective that deal with methodological issues related to the measurement of inequalities and propose theoretical frames to explain different types and levels of inequalities. Based on institutional, national or comparative case studies, quantitative, qualitative, socio-historical or mix-methods, the proposed articles should provide ground-breaking perspectives on this very topical issue.

References:

Grace, B. L., Nawyn, S. J., & Okwako, B. (2017). The right to belong (if you can afford it): Market-based restrictions on social citizenship in refugee resettlement. Journal of Refugee Studies.
Busemeyer, M. R., & Nikolai, R. (2010). Education. In F. G. Castles, S. Leibfried, J. Lewis, H. Obinger, & C. Pierson (Eds.), The Oxford handbook of the welfare state. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Cantwell, B., Marginson, S., & Smolentseva, A. (in press). (Eds.). High participation systems of higher education.
Childs, R. A., Ferguson, A. K., Herbert, M. B., Broad, K., & Zhang, J. (2016). Evaluating admission criteria effects for underrepresented groups. Higher Education Research and Development, 35, 658-668.
Dryden-Peterson, S. (2010). The politics of higher education for refugees in a global movement for primary education. Refuge, 27(2), 10-18.
Goastellec, G. (2008). Globalization and implementation of an equity norm in higher education. Peabody Journal of Education, 83(1), 71-85.
Goastellec, G., & Välimaa J. (2017). Expliquer les inégalités d’accès aux diplômes en Finlande et en Suisse (1950–2004): Des structures scolaires aux politiques sociales. Education et Société, 38(2).
Jungblut, J. (2014). Partisan politics in higher education policies: How does the left-right divide of political parties matter in higher education policy in Western Europe? In G. Goastellec, F. Picard (Eds.), Higher education and societies. A multiscale perspective (pp. 85-110). Rotterdam: Sense Publishers.
Jungblut, J., & Pietliewicz, K. (2017). (Eds.). Refugees welcome? Recognition of qualifications held by refugees and access to higher education in Europe—Country analyses. Brussels: ESU.
Lucas, S. R. (2001). Effectively maintained inequality: Education transitions, track mobility, and social background. American Journal of Sociology, 106(6), 1642-1690.
Pechar, H., & Andres, L. (2011). Higher-Education policies and welfare regimes : International comparative perspectives. Higher Education Policy, 24, 25-52.
Peter, T., Edgerton, J. D., & Roberts, L. W. (2010). Welfare regimes and educational inequality: A cross-national exploration. International studies in Sociology of Education, 2(3), 241-264.
Pilote, A., Picard, F., Goastellec, G., Turcotte, M., & Olympio, N. (2015). Opérationnaliser la théorie de la justice sociale d’Amartya Sen au champ de l’orientation scolaire: Les apports d’une étude multicas qualitative et comparative. Mesure et évalation en education, 37(3), 5-37.
Raftery, A., & Hout, M. (1993). Maximally maintained inequality: Expansion, reform, and opportunity in Irish education 1921–75. Sociology of Education, 66(1), 41-62.

Instructions for Authors: Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's editorial policies and to send their abstracts (about 200-250 words, with a tentative title) by email to the journal's editorial office (si@cogitatiopress.com) by 1 February 2018.

Open Access: The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio’s Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal’s open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

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Volume 6, Issue 4

Title: Students with Disabilities in Higher Education

Editors: Geert Van Hove (Ghent University, Belgium/VU Amsterdam, The Netherlands), Minne Bakker (VU Amsterdam, The Netherlands) and Alice Schippers (Disability Studies in the Netherlands/VU Amsterdam, The Netherlands)

Deadline for Abstracts: 28 February 2018
Submission of Full Papers: 25 to 30 June 2018
Publication of the Issue: November/December 2018

Information: Starting from ideas of Kimball, Wells, Ostigny, Manly, Lauterbach (2016) on students with disabilities in higher education and future research, this thematic issue aims at bringing together research articles that:

- Grasp experiences of students with, for e.g., ‘mental health problems’; this in opposition to most research literature—up to now—being dominated by the phenomenon of ‘learning disability’ (likely because learning disabilities are the most common type of disabilities on campuses);
- Present theoretical frameworks, as much of the research on students with disabilities in higher education is a-theoretical and higher education scholars should also intentionally reach out to existing theories in disability studies making sure that ‘intersectionality’ plays a role in the research field;
- Help to expand the methodological toolkit within qualitative research (for e.g., methods that aim to adress connections between lived experiences and social structures are seen as promising);
- Build greater attention to how we compare experiences of students with and without disabilities;
- Make sure the slogan ‘nothing about us without us’ is taken for serious by doing participatory research.

Reference
Kimball, E., Wells, R., Ostigny, B., Manly, C., & Lauterbach, A. (2016). Students with disabilities in higher education: A review of the literature and agenda for future research (pp. 91-156). In M. Paulsen (Ed.), Higher education: Handbook of theory and research. Dordrecht: Springer.

Instructions for Authors: Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's editorial policies and to send their abstracts (about 200-250 words, with a tentative title) by email to the journal's editorial office (si@cogitatiopress.com) by 28 February 2018.

Open Access: The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio’s Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal’s open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

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Volume 6, Issue 4

Title: People with Disabilities: The Overlooked Consumers

Editors: Anita Borch and Kirsi Laitala (Consumption Research Norway - SIFO, Norway)

Deadline for Abstracts: 28 February 2018
Submission of Full Papers: 15 to 30 June 2018
Publication of the Issue: November/December 2018

Information: In a report published more than 20 years ago Tim Noonan argued that too many products are inaccessible to people with a range of different disabilities. Consequently, an increasingly large group of people has reduced access to vital necessities in their everyday lives. In essence, access to vital consumer goods and services is linked to the human right of being a full member of society and living an independent life.

Since Noonan’s report was published, important political actions have been implemented to enhance the situation of disabled consumers. For example, in 2006, the Convention of the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and its Optional Protocol was launched by the United Nations. In 2015, the European Commission proposed a European Accessibility Act setting common accessibility requirements for key products and services. Thanks to these actions the situation of disabled consumers has been put on the public agenda. However, more knowledge is needed for these groups to participate fully in society.

The main objective of this thematic issue is to address current research gaps by calling for papers exploring one or more of the following questions:

- What do we know about disabled consumers today?
- How do people with disabilities differ from so-called “abled” consumers?
- What difficulties do disabled people face in everyday life as consumers?
- Are some markets, products or services more challenging than others?
- What interventions can be implemented by different kinds of actors (researchers, authorities, businesses, organisations, and the general public) at different levels (local, national, and international) to improve the situation of disabled consumers?
- What kind of interventions have already been conducted, and with what kinds of effects?

By “markets” we mean online or physical outlets at which consumers get access to free or paid goods and services. The term “disabled consumers” refers to private persons with mental, cognitive, physical, visual or hearing impairments who acquire, use and dispose of goods and services in everyday life.

Instructions for Authors: Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's editorial policies and to send their abstracts (about 200-250 words, with a tentative title) by email to the journal's editorial office (si@cogitatiopress.com) by 28 February 2018.

Open Access: The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio’s Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal’s open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

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