Social Inclusion is a quarterly peer-reviewed open access journal, which provides academics and policy-makers with a forum to discuss and promote a more socially inclusive society.

Open Access Journal | ISSN: 2183-2803

With our plurithematic issues we intended to draw the attention of researchers, policy-makers, scientists and the general public to some of the topics of highest relevance. Scholars interested in guest editing a thematic issue of Social Inclusion are kindly invited to contact the Editorial Office of the journal (si@cogitatiopress.com).

Published Thematic Issues

Published issues are available here.

Upcoming Issues


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Volume 10, Issue 1

Title:
Transnational Social Protection: Inclusion for Whom? Theoretical Reflections and Migrant Experiences


Editor(s):
Elisabeth Scheibelhofer (University of Vienna), Anna Amelina (University of Cottbus), and Emma Carmel (University of Bath)

Submission of Abstracts: 1-15 February 2021
Submission of Full Papers: 15-30 June 2021
Publication of the Issue: March 2022

Information:
During the past decades, welfare institutions in Europe and in other regions of the world have become the main pillar for the articulation of citizenship, and thus one of the essential mediums of social inclusion and exclusion. Although the linkages between migration, welfare and belonging are not a new phenomenon, their current transformations require new ways of analysing the so-called liberal paradox. Empirically speaking, we are confronted with a large variety of mobilities and migratory movements—e.g., temporary and circular patterns, cross-border lifestyles of many settled movers. The increasingly transnational quality of migration and mobility across Europe and other regions of the world has also contributed to the emergence of various forms of cross-border social membership. The latter manifest themselves in the form of phenomena such as migrants’ simultaneous use of social security arrangements in their sending and receiving countries. If welfare institutions assume responsibility for migration management and, in doing so, influence the production of differentiated life chances, then closer analysis of the social stratifications is of great importance.

This thematic issue invites articles that address the changing relationships between social protection, cross-border migrations and social membership in Europe and beyond. We ask: What are the best conceptual tools (theoretically and methodologically-speaking) to address social security governance and social protection arrangements in the context of cross-border migration?

We also invite contributions concerned with the ways in which mobile individuals organize their formal and informal social protection vis-à-vis relevant institutional opportunity structures. In particular, we invite contributions on movers’ concrete experiences of global, transnational and national social security/social membership and what experiences they have of inequalities in welfare opportunities. Articles may also address the symbolic horizons that sustain, and/or contest any forms of social protection and social membership, including debates about “social tourism.”


Instructions for Authors:
Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal’s instructions for authors and submit their abstracts (maximum of 250 words, with a tentative title) through the abstracts system (here). When submitting their abstracts, authors are also asked to confirm that they are aware that Social Inclusion is an open access journal with a publishing fee if the article is accepted for publication after peer-review (corresponding authors affiliated with our institutional members do not incur this fee).


Open Access:
The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio’s Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal’s open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

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Volume 10, Issue 1

Title:
The Political Aesthetics of the Urban Commons: Navigating the Gaze of the City, the State, the Market


Editor(s):
Peer Smets (Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam) and Louis Volont (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)

Submission of Abstracts: Closed
Submission of Full Papers: 15-31 July 2021
Publication of the Issue: February 2022

Information:

The concept of the commons and its spatial derivative of ‘common space’ (Stavrides, 2015) has seen revived attention in urban contexts. Through for example autonomous neighborhoods, urban occupations, CLTs and grassroot artistic experimentation, urbanites in the Global North and South set out to reassert participatory control over the urban commonwealth. Common space enacts a ‘third way’ beyond the neoliberal marriage between Privatization and Government Control. According to Chatterton, Featherstone, and Routledge (2013), the spatiality of the commons enacts a political imaginary which can be ‘anti (against), despite (in) and post (beyond) capitalist’.  

The relation between the commons and capitalist cities, states and markets proffers debate. Space-commoning becomes complex once the commoners involved have to collaborate with partners. Such co-creation asks for bridging the mindset of the commoner with that of cities, states and markets. On the one hand, common space unfolds as governments transpose the management of physical resources to citizen groups. As such, common space exists as an addition to city/state/market-led urban development: it is a partnership arrangement. But there is a critique to be looked at. De Angelis (2013) reports that we encounter a ‘commons fix’: As the neoliberal devastation continues, citizens are forced to step in where state and market fail. On the other hand, common space may also unfold from the bottom-up. In this vein, common space exists as a friction with city/state/market-led urban development schemes. But here, too, a critique emerges: Can common space ever take root sustainably without a helping hand from the city, the state or the market?

This thematic issue explores cross-fertilizations (poisonous or not) between the commons and their surrounding spheres of cities, states and markets in order to understand how such differences may lead to clashes or merge into new, not yet theorized forms of commoning.

References

Chatterton, P., Featherstone, D., & Routledge, P. (2013). Articulating climate justice in Copenhagen: Antagonism, the commons, and solidarity. Antipode, 45(3), 602–620.

De Angelis, M. (2013). Does capital need a commons fix? Ephemera: Theory & Politics in Organization, 13(3), 603–615.

Stavrides, S. (2015). Common space as threshold space: Urban commoning in struggles to re-appropriate public space. Footprint, 16, 9–20.


Instructions for Authors:
Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's instructions for authors and submit their abstracts (maximum of 250 words, with a tentative title) through the abstracts system (here). When submitting their abstracts, authors are also asked to confirm that they are aware that Social Inclusion is an open access journal with a publishing fee if the article is accepted for publication after peer-review (corresponding authors affiliated with our institutional members do not incur this fee).


Open Access:
The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio's Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal's open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

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Volume 10, Issue 2

Title:
Promoting Social Inclusive Experiences in Uncertain Times


Editor(s):
Ana Belén Cano-Hila (University of Barcelona)

Submission of Abstracts: 1-15 April 2021 (for invited authors only)
Submission of Full Papers: 15-30 September 2021
Publication of the Issue: April/June 2022

Information:

The UN-approved 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, endorsed in 2015, advocates for the prevention and gradual, ultimate closing of the gaps that divide us. These 17 sustainable development goals are presented as a master plan that covers the most painful global challenges to a knowledgeable and inclusive society. In this thematic issue we look more incisively into goals no. 1 (no poverty), no. 4 (quality of education and inclusive education), no. 10 (reduced inequalities) and no. 11 (sustainable cities and communities) of the 2030 Agenda.

Social inequalities have drastically intensified after the 2008 financial crisis and the period of austerity that followed, especially among the poorest people and in the most vulnerable communities. Nowadays particularly, with the Covid-19 pandemic, these gaps seem to be growing.

Against this background, this thematic issue aims to capture, make visible, understand and analyze how social actors are organizing themselves and collaborating amongst each other in order to help attenuate and satisfy dramatic emerging social needs and improve living conditions, especially among the most vulnerable social groups, in uncertain times of crisis. We will focus particularly on two main thematic blocks: social inclusion axes on the one hand (formal, non-formal and informal education, participation, leisure time and culture) and vulnerable groups on the other (including, but not limited to, children, adolescents, youth, women, elderly, people with disabilities and migrants). Proposals for this thematic issue can focus on one of these blocks independently or be a combination of the two.


Instructions for Authors:
Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's instructions for authors and submit their abstracts (maximum of 250 words, with a tentative title) through the abstracts system (here). When submitting their abstracts, authors are also asked to confirm that they are aware that Social Inclusion is an open access journal with a publishing fee if the article is accepted for publication after peer-review (corresponding authors affiliated with our institutional members do not incur this fee).


Open Access:
The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio's Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal's open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

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Volume 10, Issue 2

Title:
Challenges in School-To-Work Transition: Perspectives on Individual, Institutional and Structural Inequalities


Editor(s):
Brigitte Schels (University of Vienna / University of Erlangen-Nuremberg) and Veronika Wöhrer (University of Vienna)

Submission of Abstracts: 1-15 June 2021 (for invited authors only)
Submission of Full Papers: 1-15 November 2021
Publication of the Issue: May/June 2022

Information:

In this thematic issue we assemble different papers about transitions in educational and vocational paths of young people. Transitions between schools, vocational education and training (VET) and work pose important challenges for young people that influence their well-being and social positioning now and in the future. The young people themselves experience the transition phase as a stage of formation of aspirations and goals and its consequences. In this process, young people are confronted with the expectations and assessment of relevant others such as parents, teachers, or career counselors. Furthermore, the socio-political and institutional context is important as it defines criteria of successful transitions (e.g., VET entry) and risky transitions worthy of special support (e.g., NEET, school dropout).

We want to bring together contributions that examine the challenges in the transition from different perspectives and related facets of social inequality. The contributions in this issue address the situation of young people in employment-centered regimes of Germany and Austria. Their pronounced VET system is often considered as model for successful labor market integration of young people, while the school system is seen as comparatively impermeable leading to relatively low educational and occupational mobility. The papers deal with different transitions (mostly school to VET, partly school to school or unemployment to work) and different phases in this transition: The formation of aspirations, changing aspirations, challenges in transitions and concrete problems in transition processes like NEET youth or unemployment. The papers furthermore focus on different social categories: class, ethnicity, gender, age and (dis)ability are issues investigated in the papers. While some papers put more emphasis on social structures, others focus rather on agency and strategies that are developed by the young people experiencing transitions. Accordingly, we also pay attention to balancing different methods, bringing together findings from quantitative surveys, qualitative interviews and/or ethnography or participatory research.


Instructions for Authors:
Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's instructions for authors and submit their abstracts (maximum of 250 words, with a tentative title) through the abstracts system (here). When submitting their abstracts, authors are also asked to confirm that they are aware that Social Inclusion is an open access journal with a publishing fee if the article is accepted for publication after peer-review (corresponding authors affiliated with our institutional members do not incur this fee).


Open Access:
The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio's Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal's open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

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Volume 10, Issue 2

Title:
Educational Inclusion of Vulnerable Children and Young People after Covid-19


Editor(s):
Spyros Themelis (University of East Anglia) and Angela Tuck (Pakefield High School)

Submission of Abstracts: 1-15 June 2021
Submission of Full Papers: 15-31 October 2021
Publication of the Issue: April/June 2022

Information:

Educational inclusion is a difficult term to define and an even more difficult goal to achieve. The Covid pandemic and general lockdowns worldwide have made educational inclusion especially tenuous for vulnerable children and young people. During the pandemic, most teachers believe that pupils completed less work than expected, and while only 48% of parents engaged with secondary students’ learning at home, for those with parental support test scores have been higher than for those without. Nevertheless, online learning is suddenly upheld as the solution to inclusion of vulnerable children and young people in education. However, online solutions are not a panacea, as they have been found not to work for everyone: Globally, at least 500 million children cannot access distance learning sessions, and approximately 47% of all primary and secondary students who are targeted by national online learning platforms do not have internet access.

For this thematic issue, we invite authors to report on experiences, challenges and opportunities for inclusive education during the Covid-19 pandemic and explore possibilities beyond it. The following questions can guide (but not limit) our authors:

  • How has Covid-19 changed experiences of, practices and approaches to inclusive education?
  • What are the challenges educational organisations face in terms of including vulnerable young people?
  • Are there any models of good practice that could be shared in working with vulnerable children and young people in order to promote their educational inclusion?
  • What is the role of new technology in terms in vulnerable children and young people’s inclusion?
  • What are some successful inclusive practices that lockdown schooling during the pandemic has enabled?
  • What kind of pedagogy and pedagogic relationship(s) could promote the educational inclusion of vulnerable children and young people?
  • What is the role of interagency/multiagency working in facilitating the educational inclusion of vulnerable children and young people?
  • How has the pandemic renewed the meaning and content of inclusive education for vulnerable children and young people?
  • How do we conceptualise inclusive education beyond Covid-19 and the pandemic?
  • What are the implications of the pandemic in relation to the SDGs and their potential for school inclusion?

Instructions for Authors:
Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's instructions for authors and submit their abstracts (maximum of 250 words, with a tentative title) through the abstracts system (here). When submitting their abstracts, authors are also asked to confirm that they are aware that Social Inclusion is an open access journal with a publishing fee if the article is accepted for publication after peer-review (corresponding authors affiliated with our institutional members do not incur this fee).


Open Access:
The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio's Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal's open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

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Volume 10, Issue 3

Title:
On the Role of Space, Place and Social Networks in Social Participation


Editor(s):
Gil Viry (University of Edinburgh), Christoph van Dülmen (Thünen Institute of Rural Studies), Marion Maisonobe (CNRS–UMR Géographie-cités), and Andreas Klärner (Thünen Institute of Rural Studies)

Submission of Abstracts: 1-15 June 2021
Submission of Full Papers: 15-30 January 2022
Publication of the Issue: July/September 2022

Information:

Research has highlighted the critical role of social networks in facilitating people’s social participation. It has also shown that social ties and networks exist in and across geographical spaces. Individuals, families, diasporas, workers, activists, among others, can develop their relationships and networks over large distances, while places and spatial proximity continue to strongly shape tie formation and social participation.

While the importance of places in research on social inclusion is widely recognised, for example in neighbourhood and community studies, social network research has, however, not fully taken up issues of space, place and spatial mobility. The role of space in tie formation and maintenance, for example, has often been analysed through the unique lens of physical distance—usually as something ‘from the outside’ to overcome, rather than as an inherent characteristic of relationships and networks. But the spatial aspects of social networks are more than a set of locations and distances on a map. They are about how social and geographical contexts intersect, for example through the processes by which spatial environments affect opportunities for social interactions. They are also about the meaning individuals attach to both places and relationships, how individuals and groups experience places and spatial mobility, and how these experiences, in turn, shape their social relationships and social participation. Key network concepts such as homophily or clusters are best understood with reference to place and place attachment.

For this thematic issue we invite contributions that investigate more deeply the intersection of space, place and social networks, and address conceptual and methodological issues in this field. For example, what spatial granularity should be used to capture the spatial embeddedness of social networks? How to visualise social relationships and networks in geographical space? How to analyse similarities and differences between the relational and lived spaces? Articles can use a variety of data, approaches and methods of collecting, analysing and visualizing social relationships and networks in space. The thematic issue welcomes theoretical contributions from different disciplines (e.g., geography, sociology, urban and rural planning) as well as empirical studies using quantitative, qualitative or mixed methods.


Instructions for Authors:
Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's instructions for authors and submit their abstracts (maximum of 250 words, with a tentative title) through the abstracts system (here). When submitting their abstracts, authors are also asked to confirm that they are aware that Social Inclusion is an open access journal with a publishing fee if the article is accepted for publication after peer-review (corresponding authors affiliated with our institutional members do not incur this fee).


Open Access:
The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio's Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal's open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

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Volume 10, Issue 3

Title:
A Common European Asylum System: Utopian or Dystopian Expectations?


Editor(s):
Birgit Glorius (Chemnitz University of Technology) and Jeroen Doomernik (University of Amsterdam)

Submission of Abstracts: 1-15 June 2021
Submission of Full Papers: 15-30 December 2021
Publication of the Issue: July/September 2022

Information:

A significant touchstone for the quality of Europe’s present and future integration is the condition of its common European asylum system (CEAS). For two decades the original ambitions of the CEAS (as it has been developed by the EU member states and concluded during the 1999 Tampere Summit) included high standards of refugee protection, harmonization of law, policy and practices, and shared responsibility between the member states.

The CEAS took shape on paper, but in 2015 it proved unable to adequately cope with what is commonly referred to as the “refugee crisis,” which created considerable political tensions between (groups of) member states and challenged the EU’s cohesion. Problems arouse regarding the quest for solidarity and responsibility sharing, the harmonization of reception policies and practices, the question how to handle secondary movements, and the politicization of asylum in public discourse.

The period of numerous arrivals was followed by a period of strong ordering and bordering politics, starting with the negotiation of the EU–Turkey agreement. There were several initiatives from various stakeholders to harmonize the CEAS in order to arrive at social cohesion regarding the situation in the reception countries, but also regarding the chances for asylum seeking migrants to find shelter and the opportunity to start a new life within the realm of the European Union. The most recent crisis for the CEAS and those in need was induced by the COVID-19 pandemic, which had severe effects on the mobility of migrants via border closures, termination of rescue missions and asylum procedures.

This thematic issue will provide original research results regarding the functionality and future of the CEAS, taking a multi-scale (transnational, national, local) perspective, inspired by multiple disciplinary perspectives offered by scholars from the field of law, political science, sociology and human geography. It will thus contribute to the discussion whether utopian feelings—such as pronounced during the 1999 Tampere Council Meeting—are still merited for Europe’s ability to take responsibility for those in need of international protection.


Instructions for Authors:
Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's instructions for authors and submit their abstracts (maximum of 250 words, with a tentative title) through the abstracts system (here). When submitting their abstracts, authors are also asked to confirm that they are aware that Social Inclusion is an open access journal with a publishing fee if the article is accepted for publication after peer-review (corresponding authors affiliated with our institutional members do not incur this fee).


Open Access:
The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio's Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal's open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

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Volume 10, Issue 3

Title:
Fragile Pronatalism? Barriers to Parenthood, One-Child Families, and Childlessness in European Post-Socialist Countries


Editor(s):
Ivett Szalma (Centre for Social Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Sciences Centre of Excellence / Corvinus University of Budapest), Judit Takács (Centre for Social Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Sciences Centre of Excellence / KWI Essen), Hana Hašková (Institute of Sociology, Czech Academy of Sciences), and Livia Oláh (Stockholm University)

Submission of Abstracts: 1-15 May 2021
Submission of Full Papers: 15-30 December 2021
Publication of the Issue: July/September 2022

Information:

Pronatalist family policy is a common feature of many post-socialist societies in Europe, aimed to increase fertility levels, while parenthood—especially motherhood—is an almost obligatory social norm. The demographic reality shows, however, a high prevalence of one-child families, and childlessness rates, although comparatively low at present, increase among younger cohorts. At the same time, specific groups, notably same-sex couples, are excluded from the all-encompassing social norms of parenthood. Also, pronatalist policies regulating access to assisted reproductive technologies are often selective, heteronormative and exclusionary.

Gendered familialist policies add to the exclusionary practice too, as in most post-socialist countries it is difficult to combine work and family obligations. Public childcare provision under age three is extremely limited, which together with high prevalence of traditional gender norms are likely to have contributed to the very low fertility rates in the last decades.

In European post-socialist countries, many people fail to fulfil their parenting desires, which clearly relates to social inequalities. Women especially feel that they are forced to choose between family and career. Some people are excluded from the possibility to become parents, others adjust their fertility intentions downwards in their life course. Middle-class families often greatly benefit from pronatalist family policies, unlike low-income families and people less integrated into the labour market. Indeed, pronatalist policies in post-socialist countries do not follow an inclusive approach, the measures provided are frequently selective, bordering on discrimination.

We invite contributions exploring barriers to parenthood at different levels, addressing conditions of transitioning to first birth, or investigating childlessness and one-child intentions in post-socialist contexts. We welcome qualitative, quantitative, and mixed method studies, and especially those that focus on gender(ed) aspects and social inequalities. We also welcome comparative studies that include at least one post-socialist country, contributing with new knowledge on the barriers to parenthood.


Instructions for Authors:
Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's instructions for authors and submit their abstracts (maximum of 250 words, with a tentative title) through the abstracts system (here). When submitting their abstracts, authors are also asked to confirm that they are aware that Social Inclusion is an open access journal with a publishing fee if the article is accepted for publication after peer-review (corresponding authors affiliated with our institutional members do not incur this fee).


Open Access:
The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio's Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal's open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

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Volume 10, Issue 4

Title:
Life Course Justice and Learning


Editor(s):
Aija Lulle (Loughborough University), Remus G. Anghel (Romanian Institute for Research on National Minorities / SNSPA–National University of Political Studies and Public Administration), Caitriona Ni Laoire (University College Cork), and Russell King (University of Sussex)

Submission of Abstracts: 1-15 December 2021
Submission of Full Papers: 15-30 April 2022
Publication of the Issue: October/December 2022

Information:

While the literature on life course transitions demonstrates increasingly greater diversity across life courses, the standard measure of an imagined template against which life progression is measured remains hegemonic. Hence, in practice, people with so-called non-standard, unconventional and non-linear life course transitions face distinct barriers, but also opportunities to follow an education, obtain jobs and establish meaningful careers. Migrants are side-lined in special classes and courses, as are mature students in more specified evening studies or higher education institutions. Class, gender and other intersections are determinant of who can access opportunities to study and subsequently develop professional skills and decent careers.

To move beyond this impasse of the hegemonic role of the ‘standard life course,’ we need to expose whose standards these are and how they affect people’s life chances in different places and times. How do institutional powers constrain chances for people to study, work and establish their own ‘homes’ when their life courses are deemed non-standard? Which institutional powers are these? How does human agency play a role in overcoming such constraints?

This thematic issue seeks contributions that theoretically and empirically unpack the idea of life course justice. Authors are challenged to develop critical inquiries into how wealth, opportunities and privilege are distributed and constrained in certain life stages and situations.

We invite theoretically nuanced and empirically rigorous contributions on the following indicative themes (the list is not exhaustive):

  • Learning pathways and life courses of migrants and refugees who are classified as chronologically older than their ‘local’ peers
  • Language and professional learning in adult age in order to obtain employment in an immigration country
  • Intergenerational relations in families where life course chances are affected by the constraints and opportunities of prevalent standards of what people ought to do in certain life stages
  • Institutional efforts to democratise learning times and spaces for life course justice

Instructions for Authors:
Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's instructions for authors and submit their abstracts (maximum of 250 words, with a tentative title) through the abstracts system (here). When submitting their abstracts, authors are also asked to confirm that they are aware that Social Inclusion is an open access journal with a publishing fee if the article is accepted for publication after peer-review (corresponding authors affiliated with our institutional members do not incur this fee).


Open Access:
The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio's Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal's open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

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Volume 10, Issue 4

Title:
Critical Refugee Intersections: Before, During, and After Flight


Editor(s):
Niro Kandasamy (University of Sydney), Lauren Avery (University of York), and Karen Soldatic (Western Sydney University) as part of the (In)Justice International Collective

Submission of Abstracts: 1-15 December 2021
Submission of Full Papers: 15-30 April 2022
Publication of the Issue: October/December 2022

Information:

Article 1A of the 1951 United Nations Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees offered five important definitional elements that help establish individuals as refugees: (a) a person’s situation of genuine risk; (b) the existence of a threat of persecution; (c) the reasons behind this persecution—a point which alluded to the possible intimidation levelled against ethnicity, Indigenous status, nationality, religion, one’s membership of a particular social group or political opinion; (d) conditions of relocation and whether the move into a different country placed an individual under threat; and finally (e) the needs and deserts of relocated individuals and the ways they should be safeguarded.

This attempt at defining refugees was deemed superficial and limited for the political climate of the time: Those fleeing from the threats of invasion or decolonisation in Africa and Asia were not considered, nor was the creation of a new kind of refugees fleeing communism in Eastern Europe and China during the cold war period. As a result, the 1967 Protocol Relating to the Status of Refugees was implemented to redefine, embrace, and protect these alternative refugees who had come under threat from the emergence of the new global politics and relations of power after 1951. Yet, the desired aim of protection and acceptance of all refugees has never been fully achieved and many were left stateless, without shelter and refuge. This is still the situation that exists in the 21st century for those seeking asylum.

This thematic issue is about the many diverse experiences of those seeking safety and protection, with different views on what these terms mean. With diverse refugee voices becoming more and more audible, informing scholarship on policy levels, the idea of what “critical refugee intersections” is and looks like continues to evolve. This thematic issue aims to give researchers and practitioners the opportunity to trace the predicament of refugees in the course of their migration process, with a particular focus on intersectional experiences of race, ethnicity, class, gender, caste, sexuality, disability, age, and rurality.

Topics of interest to this thematic issue include (but are not limited to) why these people felt the need to seek refuge elsewhere, what happened on their route to “safe” sanctuaries, and how they were treated/received at their final or current destinations. Proposals relating to the traumatic events of any group of fleeing refugees are encouraged, but we especially welcome those focused on movement from and within the Global South.

Case studies which carefully analyse the growing exodus of people fearful of the Taliban in Afghanistan after the hasty withdrawal of military forces from the US, UK, and the UN, and analysis of recent changes to asylum and resettlement policy and practice are also highly valued.

We welcome full length manuscripts, NGO and policy briefs (commentaries), and reviews of critical refugee works including academic books, exhibitions, films, and non-fiction books.


Instructions for Authors:
This thematic issue is the result of Social Inclusion’s partnership with research network (In)Justice International, who is also available to cover open access publication costs on a case-by-case basis. To know if you are eligible to have the APC covered by the network, please contact Simon Prideaux (s.j.prideaux@leeds.ac.uk) directly. Corresponding authors affiliated with our institutional members do not incur this fee. Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's instructions for authors and submit their abstracts (maximum of 250 words, with a tentative title) through the abstracts system (here).


Open Access:
The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio's Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. For this thematic issue, (In)Justice International will also be available to cover open access publication costs on a case-by-case basis. To know if you are eligible to have the APC covered by the network, please contact Simon Prideaux (s.j.prideaux@leeds.ac.uk) directly. Further information about the journal's open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

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Volume 10, Issue 4

Title:
Wealth Stratification and the Insurance Function of Wealth


Editor(s):
Nora Müller (GESIS–Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences), Klaus Pforr (GESIS–Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences), and Jascha Dräger (GESIS–Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences)

Submission of Abstracts: 1-15 March 2022
Submission of Full Papers: 1-15 July 2022
Publication of the Issue: December 2022

Information:

Private wealth is an essential component of socioeconomic status, with substantial effects on education, family formation, and health (Killewald, Pfeffer, & Schachner, 2017). However, few studies have empirically tested which underlying processes drive these wealth effects. In this thematic issue, we want to shed light on the insurance function, a mechanism considered one of the main drivers of wealth effects (e.g., Hällsten & Pfeffer, 2017). There are two scenarios in which wealth can affect behavior by acting as a safety net. First, wealth can protect individuals from the consequences of adverse events (“actual insurance function”). Second, wealth allows individuals to make riskier decisions because they can anticipate wealth to protect them in case of failure (“anticipated insurance function”).

From a macro perspective, wealth can work as a private substitute for welfare state services, acting as a buffer against “adverse” life events like sickness, unemployment, divorce, or retirement. Previous research showed that in countries with less generous social welfare state services, wealth is more relevant for several individual-level outcomes (e.g., Hochman & Skopek, 2013; Maskileyson, 2014).

Our thematic issue seeks quantitative-empirical research testing the insurance function. Single-country studies can evaluate the insurance function of wealth under specific circumstances. Research questions include, but are not limited to:

  • Are wealthy individuals more likely to make risky life course decisions (Lovenheim, 2011; Lovenheim & Mumford, 2013)?
  • Do individuals expecting to receive a wealth transfer make riskier decisions (Doorley & Pestel, 2020; Greenberg, 2013)?
  • Is there heterogeneity in consequences of negative life events or economic crises (e.g., COVID-19) concerning wealth (Kuhn & Brulé, 2019; Rodems & Pfeffer, 2020)?
  • Under which circumstances do families or relatives compensate for negative life events with wealth transfers (Erola, Kilpi-Jakonen, Prix, & Lehti, 2018)?

Cross-country studies can try to identify how welfare state services moderate the importance of wealth as private insurance.

References

Doorley, K., & Pestel, N. (2020). Labour supply after inheritances and the role of expectations. Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, 82(4), 843–863. https://doi.org/10.1111/obes.12353

Erola, J., Kilpi-Jakonen, E., Prix, I., & Lehti, H. (2018). Resource compensation from the extended family: Grandparents, aunts, and uncles in Finland and the United States. European Sociological Review, 34(4), 348–364. https://doi.org/10.1093/esr/jcy021

Greenberg, A. E. (2013). When imagining future wealth influences risky decision making. Judgment and Decision Making, 8(3), 268–277.

Hällsten, M., & Pfeffer, F. T. (2017). Grand advantage: Family wealth and grandchildren’s educational achievement in Sweden. American Sociological Review, 82(2), 328–360. https://doi.org/10.1177/0003122417695791

Hochman, O., & Skopek, N. (2013). The impact of wealth on subjective well-being: A comparison of three welfare-state regimes. Research in Social Stratification and Mobility, 34, 127–141. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rssm.2013.07.003

Killewald, A., Pfeffer, F. T., & Schachner, J. N. (2017). Wealth inequality and accumulation. Annual Review of Sociology, 43(1). https://doi.org/10.1146/annurev-soc-060116-53331

Kuhn, U., & Brulé, G. (2019). Buffering effects for negative life events: The role of material, social, religious and personal resources. Journal of Happiness Studies, 20, 1397–1417. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10902-018-9995-x

Lovenheim, M. F. (2011). The effect of liquid housing wealth on college enrollment. Journal of Labor Economics, 29(4), 741–771. https://doi.org/10.1086/660775

Lovenheim, M. F., & Mumford, K. J. (2013). Do family wealth shocks affect fertility choices? Evidence from the housing market. Review of Economics and Statistics, 95(2), 464–475. https://doi.org/10.1162/REST_a_00266

Maskileyson, D. (2014). Healthcare system and the wealth–health gradient: A comparative study of older populations in six countries. Social Science & Medicine, 119, 18–26. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.socscimed.2014.08.013

Rodems, R., & Pfeffer, F. T. (2020). Avoiding material hardship: The buffer function of wealth (CID Discussion Paper No. 1). Ann Arbor, MI: CID.


Instructions for Authors:
Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's instructions for authors and submit their abstracts (maximum of 250 words, with a tentative title) through the abstracts system (here). When submitting their abstracts, authors are also asked to confirm that they are aware that Social Inclusion is an open access journal with a publishing fee if the article is accepted for publication after peer-review (corresponding authors affiliated with our institutional members do not incur this fee).


Open Access:
The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio's Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal's open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

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Volume 10, Issue 4

Title:
New Approaches to the Study of Social Inclusion of Poor Children and Youth


Editor(s):
Anita Borch (OsloMet) and Kirsi Laitala (OsloMet)

Submission of Abstracts: 1-15 September 2021
Submission of Full Papers: 15-30 January 2022
Publication of the Issue: October 2022

Information:

Poverty, often passed from one generation to another, is associated with an increased risk of being marginalized and socially excluded in childhood and adult life. Why some poor children connect to their surroundings while others do not is, however, insufficiently understood, diminishing our chance to develop efficient policy measures aiming to reduce social inequality and increase social mobility.

This thematic issue seeks to bring the field of science on poverty and social inclusion/exclusion beyond the state-of-the-art. Empirically, contributions can offer updated knowledge on social inclusion and exclusion of children and youth (up to 24-year-olds) from important areas in life such as education, labour, spare time activities or home. Focus should be on children and youth of low income families and, if relevant, on how material deprivation intersects with other risk factors of social inclusion and exclusion such as disabilities or immigrant background.

Theoretical contributions can explore poor children/youth in their social surroundings from a new theoretical angle, bringing new insights into social inclusion/exclusion processes and mechanisms promoting or hindering these groups from taking a part in society, such as theories of belonging, practice theory and actor-network.

Methodological contributions can use techniques equipped to assess the role of economy and materials in children’s life experienced through action, language and senses—vision, touch, smell, sound and taste. These include well-established methodologies like desktop studies, interviews, observations and surveys, as well as novel methodologies that have gained ground in recent years, like visual ethnography, children as co-researchers, stakeholder/user-involvement, etc. Policy-oriented contributions are also welcome.


Instructions for Authors:
Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's instructions for authors and submit their abstracts (maximum of 250 words, with a tentative title) through the abstracts system (here). When submitting their abstracts, authors are also asked to confirm that they are aware that Social Inclusion is an open access journal with a publishing fee if the article is accepted for publication after peer-review (corresponding authors affiliated with our institutional members do not incur this fee).


Open Access:
The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio's Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal's open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

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Volume 11, Issue 1

Title:
Disability and Social Inclusion: Lessons from the Pandemic


Editor(s):
Owen Barden (Liverpool Hope University), Laura Waite (Liverpool Hope University), Erin Pritchard (Liverpool Hope University), and Ana Bê Pereira (Liverpool Hope University)

Submission of Abstracts: 15-30 November 2021
Submission of Full Papers: 15-30 April 2022
Publication of the Issue: January/February 2023

Information:

The Coronavirus pandemic necessitated rapid, radical changes to global systems, structures and organisations across all areas of life, including education, healthcare and social services. These changes were something of a double-edged sword. On the one hand, widespread adoption of the kinds of remote-working technologies long advocated for by disabled people opened up possibilities for inclusion. On the other, some people’s inability to access such technologies, together with increased social isolation, exacerbated forms of exclusion. This thematic issue considers what lessons can be learned from the pandemic in striving to design a future which is more inclusive for all.

Submissions may have theoretical, empirical or experiential bases. Topics can include, but are not limited to:

  • Social inclusion and social isolation for disabled people during the pandemic;
  • Lived experience of disability during the pandemic;
  • Intersectionality and the pandemic;
  • Relationships between educational and social inclusion/exclusion during the pandemic;
  • Disability and networked individualism;
  • Disability and the digital divide;
  • Futurity and the pandemic: Where do we go from here?

Instructions for Authors:
Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's instructions for authors and submit their abstracts (maximum of 250 words, with a tentative title) through the abstracts system (here). When submitting their abstracts, authors are also asked to confirm that they are aware that Social Inclusion is an open access journal with a publishing fee if the article is accepted for publication after peer-review (corresponding authors affiliated with our institutional members do not incur this fee).


Open Access:
The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio's Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal's open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

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Volume 11, Issue 1

Title:
Family Supportive Networks and Practices in Vulnerable Contexts


Editor(s):
Jacques-Antoine Gauthier (University of Lausanne) and Vida Česnuitytė (Mykolas Romeris University)

Submission of Abstracts: 1-15 February 2022 (for invited authors only)
Submission of Full Papers: 15-31 July 2022
Publication of the Issue: January/March 2023

Information:

In response to the current and ongoing political, economic uncertainties, and/or health crisis observable in many European countries, contemporary families are increasingly exposed to living conditions that are permanently changing. This has an impact on both their internal functioning and on the relationship they establish with institutions of the welfare state. These conditions have multiple consequences on different dimensions of family life, such as conjugal and parental stability, fertility, participation in the labor market, connectivity, migration, or life expectancy. They therefore challenge not only the definition of family, but also that of its boundaries and of members with their specific roles and practices.

One of the central functions of family is to provide care and support to its members. However, when stressful events occur in the life course they can strengthen or weaken social ties, networking dynamics, division of tasks, and hence transform family practices. For instance, intergenerational solidarity may be modified when members of the younger generation remain childless. Moreover, the organization of the child- and elderly-care largely depends on the availability of dedicated institutional structures and targeted social policies. Their absence may cause overload and/or loneliness. Caregiving depends also on the availability and of the commitment of close network members. When facing adverse circumstances, not only kin members, but also non-kin members may be required for such activities. Last but not least, these contextual uncertainties have an impact on gender roles and hence on practices regarding household division of tasks and caregiving in the family and family networks.

The aim of this thematic issue is to shed light on the current state of caregiving and support practices within family networks in a European cross-national perspective, including Czech Republic, Hungary, Italy, Lithuania, Poland, and Switzerland.

The articles selected for this thematic issue are all based on oral presentations made in 2021 in two conferences of the research network Sociology of Families and Intimate Lives, of the European Sociological Association (ESA RN13). The results provided by the selected articles are all based on empirical researches using different methodological approaches.


Instructions for Authors:
Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's instructions for authors and submit their abstracts (maximum of 250 words, with a tentative title) through the abstracts system (here). When submitting their abstracts, authors are also asked to confirm that they are aware that Social Inclusion is an open access journal with a publishing fee if the article is accepted for publication after peer-review (corresponding authors affiliated with our institutional members do not incur this fee).


Open Access:
The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio's Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal's open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

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Volume 11, Issue 1

Title:
Resisting a “Smartness” That is All Over the Place: Technology as a Marker of In/Ex/Seclusion


Editor(s):
Karin Hannes (KU Leuven, Belgium) and Fred Truyen (KU Leuven)

Submission of Abstracts: 1-15 March 2022
Submission of Full Papers: 15-31 July 2022
Publication of the Issue: January 2023

Information:

We live in a societal realm where robotics and artificial intelligence are strongly reshaping our futures. The boundaries between (wo)mankind and machine are becoming increasingly blurred. Our phones are an extension of our hand, our computers have become the gatekeepers to significant others. Robots we are not—perhaps not yet. Desires, expectations and visions differ. Where would a detailed cartography of the individual and social impact of becoming (or already partly being or aspiring to be) a machine lead us? How do we imagine a future with, without or as part of the materiality that currently surrounds us? Who imagines what and how do the implicit world views as presented in fiction, fantasy and progressive research shape our future image?

We tremble, we hesitate, we struggle to make sense of belonging to the cloud and the tangibility of our private spaces. Perhaps we all fear the idea of the machines taking over, but the impact of this would be (and already is) unequally distributed in workspaces, schools and life more generally. The idea recasts our vision on what it means to be present as a human in a fast, increasingly digital environment, leaving some but not necessarily all behind. It reshapes our notion of what an identity is, or how particular identities embody themselves in their relation to others, humans and non-humans.

New complexities and assemblages challenge our thinking and actions. Who is in? Who is out? When does technology become a marker of inclusivity or exclusivity? Can it be both at the same time? Who is rewriting the discourse on inclusive societies? A new generation of digital natives sits on the forefront of decision-making. We adopt and adapt in the absence of clear alternatives. At the same time, we try to imagine what a playful fusion with technology would look like. Is a symbiotic relationship with non-humans possible? If so, how can we build an affirmative, pleasure-prone relationship with them for all?

We invite the scholarly community to help us think through the multiple challenges this rapid change will bring. Technological progress creates new possibilities. Alternatively, it might perhaps pose a danger to liberal democracy or reinstall undesirable exclusion mechanisms. Bring your stories about how humans materialize differently as a result of the discursive-material socio-technical realities they are part of. Increase our insight in how machines think, act, sympathize and socialize with privileged as well as non-privileged populations. Think techno-embodiment, self-design, artification, digi-bodiment, smart cities that empower rather than belittle humans. All humans. But equally, bring your evidence for when and how to resist a technological smartness that is all over the place, particularly when leaving some but not all behind.


Instructions for Authors:
Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's instructions for authors and submit their abstracts (maximum of 250 words, with a tentative title) through the abstracts system (here). When submitting their abstracts, authors are also asked to confirm that they are aware that Social Inclusion is an open access journal with a publishing fee if the article is accepted for publication after peer-review (corresponding authors affiliated with our institutional members do not incur this fee).


Open Access:
The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio's Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal's open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

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Volume 11, Issue 1

Title:
Post-Migration Stress: Racial Microaggressions and Everyday Discrimination


Editor(s):
Fabio Quassoli (Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca) and Monica Colombo (Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca)

Submission of Abstracts: 1-15 March 2022
Submission of Full Papers: 15-31 July 2022
Publication of the Issue: January/March 2023

Information:

This thematic issue aims at presenting new and original research on post-migration stress and the ways racial microaggressions and discrimination influence the everyday experiences of both migrants and asylum seekers, as well as their feelings of inclusion/exclusion.

Pre-migration trauma is recognized as a key predictor of mental health outcomes, especially in refugees and asylum seekers (Carlson & Rosser-Hogan, 1991; Mollica et al., 1998). Studies indicate that migrants and asylum seekers are typically exposed to numerous types of potentially traumatic experiences in their home countries and during displacement (Marshall et al., 2005; Mollica et al., 1999). As a result, rates of major psychological disorders (including post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, and anxiety), particularly among asylum seekers and refugees, are higher than in the general population (Li et al., 2016).

Overall, the post-migration experience is multi-layered and can be influenced by a complex and multifaceted set of factors (economic, social, cultural, and linguistic) related to both the departure and destination contexts (Hynie, 2018). Besides, increasingly restrictive immigration and asylum policies have been introduced over the last decade, in Europe and North America (extended processing times, the implementation of temporary (rather than permanent) visas for refugees, longer periods of mandatory detention, etc.). The newcomers’ experience is often fraught with great uncertainty, requiring individuals to navigate increasingly complex legal procedures and face numerous barriers to access fundamental rights and services. From the earliest stages, the journey of inclusion becomes stressful and anxiety-inducing and is characterized by resettlement stress, distrust of authority, and perceived discrimination and stigma (Rugunanan & Smit, 2011). In addition to symptoms of depression (Kim, 2016), perceived discrimination and stigma feed on otherness (Hatoss, 2012) and a sense of exclusion (Ryan et al., 2008).

The emergence of a kind of “belonging boundary” (Morrice, 2013) is also boosted by negative representations of asylum seekers and refugees by mainstream media that fuel growing hostility towards them (Krzyżanowski et al., 2018). They are defined not from their own characteristics “but simply by the fact that they are ‘not one of us,’ and are, therefore, a threat to ‘our way of life’” (Kundnani, 2001, p. 52). A perception of threat that fosters discriminatory attitudes and often results in a myriad of everyday ethnic and racial micro-aggressions that can strongly influence migrants/refugees’ well-being and feeling of inclusion (El-Bialy & Mulay, 2020).

Microaggressions are subtle, covert acts that might appear harmless, but that accumulate to harm both the mental well-being of migrants and asylum seekers and their feeling of exclusion (Wong, 2014). Ethnic-racial microaggressions (Sue, 2010) and everyday racism (Essed, 1991) have so far been little studied in relation to migratory processes (especially in Europe). This thematic issue aims to offer a deeper understanding of these processes at various levels: in interpersonal and inter-group relationships across a variety of institutional settings (schools, mental health, social services, etc.) and in everyday experience. Studies of everyday forms of resistance will be of particular interest. On the methodological ground, we will privilege in-depth qualitative studies.

Relevant research topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Discrimination and racism in institutional/work contexts
  • Discrimination and racism in everyday informal situations
  • The perception of being unduly classified and made inferior based on negative stereotypes or common-sense categorization
  • Consequences of racial and ethnic aggression in terms of overall well-being and feelings of social exclusion
  • Resistance practices, avoidance tactics, and passing

Instructions for Authors:
Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's instructions for authors and submit their abstracts (maximum of 250 words, with a tentative title) through the abstracts system (here). When submitting their abstracts, authors are also asked to confirm that they are aware that Social Inclusion is an open access journal with a publishing fee if the article is accepted for publication after peer-review (corresponding authors affiliated with our institutional members do not incur this fee).


Open Access:
The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio's Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal's open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

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Volume 11, Issue 2

Title:
Effecting Systemic Change: Critical Strategic Approaches to Social Inclusion


Editor(s):
Nick J. Mulé (York University) and Luann Good Gingrich (York University)

Submission of Abstracts: 1-15 June 2022
Submission of Full Papers: 15-30 October 2022
Publication of the Issue: April/May 2023

Information:

This thematic issue will focus on critical, insightful, and innovative strategic approaches to social inclusion through change in social systems. The literature is replete with the need for systemic change to address growing divides within and between nations that leave many individuals and groups increasingly marginalized and disenfranchised, yet very little on how this can be done. Global crises have drawn attention to the disproportionate vulnerabilities and hardships experienced by people who are immigrants and refugees, living with disabilities, LGBTQ, Black and Indigenous, low income, precariously employed, elderly, young and female workers, to name a few. Perhaps as never before, there is widespread recognition that social institutions and systems have let many down, we need to “build back better.” Yet we acknowledge a paucity of academic literature that proposes and operationalizes systemic analyses and change to promote dynamics of social inclusion rather than social exclusion.

This thematic issue tackles a systemic view, a wide-angle lens, that analyses social institutions and societies to be mutually productive and malleable, rather than self-reproducing and inevitable, to explore opportunities and visions for transformation. Such perspectives reject common sense and individualized models of social inclusion geared toward person-change measures that imply and conceal an uncontested ‘centre’ or series of ‘centres’ whereby voluntary engagement or mandatory insertion moves an individual from social exclusion to inclusion. To the contrary, a systems analysis situates societies as nested social environments, structured by and structuring various social systems, including business, labour, health, education, legal, political, and social service sectors—all of which are implicated in organizing individuals and communities, thus perpetuating social divides and disparities. Articles for this thematic issue will offer effective and responsive approaches, principles, practices, and/or models for impactful systemic change, whether internally and/or externally, towards meaningful and practical social inclusion in our institutions, communities, and societies.


Instructions for Authors:
Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's instructions for authors and submit their abstracts (maximum of 250 words, with a tentative title) through the abstracts system (here). When submitting their abstracts, authors are also asked to confirm that they are aware that Social Inclusion is an open access journal with a publishing fee if the article is accepted for publication after peer-review (corresponding authors affiliated with our institutional members do not incur this fee).


Open Access:
The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio's Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal's open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

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Volume 11, Issue 3

Title:
Artificial Intelligence and Ethnic, Religious, and Gender-Based Discrimination


Editor(s):
Derya Ozkul (University of Oxford)

Submission of Abstracts: 1-15 September 2022
Submission of Full Papers: 15-31 January 2023
Publication of the Issue: August/September 2023

Information:

The use of artificial intelligence-based technologies, including biometrics and blockchain, is on the rise in many sectors. Still, these new technologies are often employed with no regulation, weak oversight and governance mechanisms. The existing literature suggests that the deployment of these technologies has been opaque with little knowledge about who has access to the data, with whom it is shared and who is accountable for the wrongdoings of humans and automated decision-makers in the process. In many sectors, recipients are obliged to provide their consent in order to receive the product, without knowing how their data will be used and how it will be protected.

Moreover, these new technologies have been introduced without an examination of possible forms of exclusion. Like any other tool, technology in itself is not neutral. The ability to design, own and use AI-based technologies is directly related to relationships of power. Not only assessing individual characteristics and posing a risk to privacy rights, biometric identification can discriminate according to group-based (gender, ethnic, religious) characteristics. For instance, existing preliminary research finds that 'machine bias' against gender and racialised characteristics of individuals persist in the scanning of CVs and in assessments of criminals' likelihood of becoming a recidivist. Even though there is growing activism on risks to data privacy, there are very few scholarly investigations on how AI-based technologies can give rise to discrimination of certain groups over others.

This thematic issue will explore the following questions and related topics: To what extent the use of new technologies result in discrimination based on gender, ethnic or religious backgrounds? What are the newly emerging governance mechanisms to mitigate such forms of discrimination? How is accountability ensured in the design and implementation stages? What is the role of civil society and courts in challenging the 'machine bias'? This thematic issue invites articles with a critical lens and empirically novel findings across various spheres, including but not limited to courts, public security, and border management, among others.


Instructions for Authors:
Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal’s instructions for authors and submit their abstracts (maximum of 250 words, with a tentative title) through the abstracts system (here). When submitting their abstracts, authors are also asked to confirm that they are aware that Social Inclusion is an open access journal with a publishing fee if the article is accepted for publication after peer-review (corresponding authors affiliated with our institutional members do not incur this fee).


Open Access:
The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio’s Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal’s open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

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Volume 11, Issue 3

Title:
Delineating the Boundaries of Digital Inclusion: Perspectives From Network Peripheries and Non-Adopters


Editor(s):
Rob McMahon (University of Alberta), Nadezda Nazarova (Nord University), and Laura Robinson (Santa Clara University)

Submission of Abstracts: 1-15 July 2022
Submission of Full Papers: 15-31 January 2023
Publication of the Issue: July/September 2023

Information:

The design and deployment of the globalizing network society tend to follow a logic that extends from centres of power out to more peripheral areas that are drawn into the dominant system. This logic is reflected in discourses of digital inclusion, which seek to integrate marginalized individuals, groups, and territories in existing digital infrastructures and systems. Starosielski (2015, pp.10–11) notes in her study of the undersea cable network that “centralizing forces continue to permeate and underpin the extension of networks,” while at the same time surfacing the “conflicts, contestations, and negotiations that shape systems on the ground” (Starosielski, 2015, p. 82). The process of digital inclusion involves tensions and contradictions grounded in the conditions of groups and individuals located at the nodes of globalizing networks. As Baym (2015, pp. 51–52) writes, “machines can and do accelerate certain trends, cultural weaknesses, and fortify certain social structures while eroding others.” Furthermore, researchers have long identified embedded values in the design, development, and implementation of digital technologies and infrastructures, many of which inadvertently threaten to perpetuate existing hierarchies and introduce new forms of domination and inequality in areas such as class, race, gender and so on (e.g., van Deursen & van Dijk, 2013). In short, struggles between hegemonic ontologies of inclusion and the agency of socially marginalized groups are present in digital inclusion projects situated in a variety of “hard to reach” terrains: from spatially dispersed communities to those which remain metaphorically “disconnected,” sometimes by choice.

In this thematic issue we invite provocations from these diverse “non-adopters” of digital technologies, with the goal of learning from them about the potential and limitations of existing forms of digital inclusion. As Dutta (2020, p. 333) argues: “The principle of communicative equality shapes the solidarities in the actual work of building communicative infrastructures that are anchored in subaltern voices, guided by subaltern logics and owned by subaltern communities.” The first set of papers considers ways to think about network ontologies from the perspectives of non-adopters. These authors present us with new ways to consider social and digital inclusion from those who wish to remain disconnected. The second set of papers visits geographically dispersed communities to learn from groups who are working to connect themselves, and in doing so, foregrounding values and design choices that can inform understandings of how to shape digital initiatives in more inclusive directions. Together, these two sets of papers balance agency with critical analysis, pointing us to ways to conceptualize emergent digital networks as active mediating forces in relations of social inclusion.

References

Baym, N. (2015). Personal connections in the digital age. Polity Press.

Dutta, M. (2020). Communication, culture and social change: Meaning, co-option and resistance. Palgrave Macmillan.

Starosielski, N. (2015). The undersea network. Duke University Press.

van Deursen, A. J. A. M., & van Dijk, J. A. G. M. (2013). The digital divide shifts to differences in usage. New Media & Society, 16(3), 507–526.


Instructions for Authors:
Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's instructions for authors and submit their abstracts (maximum of 250 words, with a tentative title) through the abstracts system (here). When submitting their abstracts, authors are also asked to confirm that they are aware that Social Inclusion is an open access journal with a publishing fee if the article is accepted for publication after peer-review (corresponding authors affiliated with our institutional members do not incur this fee).


Open Access:
The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio's Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal's open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

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Volume 11, Issue 4

Title:
Digitalization of Working Worlds and Social Inclusion


Editor(s):
Simone Haasler (GESIS–Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences) and Alice Melchior (GESIS–Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences)

Submission of Abstracts: 1-15 December 2022
Submission of Full Papers: 15-30 April 2023
Publication of the Issue: October/November 2023

Information:

The current digitalization implies a profound societal transformation that will significantly restructure our working lives. For society, and for the world of work in particular, the dynamics of digitalization present one of the major challenges. Thereby, the digital transformation of work does not simply relate to technological innovation, but rather should be understood as a complex socio-technical process, which is socially prepared, technically enabled, discursively negotiated, and ultimately individually mastered. As a result, the digitalization of working worlds is characterized by multiple dimensions and processes that evolve and proceed unevenly, interacting in complex ways and not uncommonly contradicting one another.

While different approaches and lines of argument evolve around the digital transformation of work, three overarching strands of discussion can be identified. These address the relation between (a) work and society, (b) work and organization, and (c) work and technology. Regarding the relation between (a) work and society, we can see the social impact of digitalization, resulting in disadvantages for certain groups of society at the labor market, including gender disparities, uneven labor market participation structures, newly emerging employee categories, or concerns evolving around work-life balance, to name a few. Also, the relationship of and interaction between service economies and production are changing significantly due to digitalization processes.

For the dimension (b) work and organization, we can observe changing working conditions of employees, new business models, struggles of labor policy to set regulations for digital work as well as inter-company aspects such as how digitalization is modifying the interplay between autonomy and control, between managers and employees, between management and representative bodies, and between platform providers and crowd-workers, among other aspects.

In terms of the relation between (c) work and technology, the focus is placed on changes in work processes within organizations. Observed changes modify socio-technical structures and related forms of interaction and collaboration, which may significantly affect and restructure individual workplaces. In this context, Internet of Things (IoT), Big Data, or artificial intelligence (AI), among others, enable increasing connectivity and integration of physical and digital worlds so that interaction and collaboration between several actors, people and robots, and people and algorithms are undergoing a dynamic expansion. New job profiles, skill demands, and training requirements are one facet of the implications these dynamics may induce.

Against this background, this thematic issue explores the implications and dynamics of social inclusion and exclusion related to the digital transformation of working worlds. We invite contributions that consider the interplay between the multiple dynamics and dimensions of the digitalization of work and social inclusion, for example (but not exclusively) in terms of gender, age, work status, employment groups, qualifications and skills, as well as sectors and countries, or their intersections in specific work domains or work dimensions such as work processes, employment opportunities, careers, and working conditions. We welcome theoretical contributions as well as empirical and comparative studies conducted using qualitative, quantitative, or mixed methods.


Instructions for Authors:
Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's instructions for authors and submit their abstracts (maximum of 250 words, with a tentative title) through the abstracts system (here). When submitting their abstracts, authors are also asked to confirm that they are aware that Social Inclusion is an open access journal with a publishing fee if the article is accepted for publication after peer-review (corresponding authors affiliated with our institutional members do not incur this fee).


Open Access:
The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio's Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal's open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

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Volume 11, Issue 4

Title:
Adult Migrants’ Language Learning, Labour Market, and Social Inclusion


Editor(s):
Andreas Fejes (Linköping University) and Magnus Dahlstedt (Linköping University)

Submission of Abstracts: 1-15 December 2022
Submission of Full Papers: 15-30 April 2023
Publication of the Issue: October/December 2023

Information:

Language learning and language education plays a central role in adult migrants’ establishment in the receiving country. This issue has gained increased political significance in the wake of globalization (Canagarajah, 2017). Whereas adult migrants’ knowledge of the receiving country’s official language is often treated as a prerequisite for social inclusion, the alleged lack of language competence among adult migrants is often considered a threat to social cohesion (Rydell, 2018a). However, adult migrants anywhere are a quite heterogeneous group, with different life experiences and conditions for language learning and social inclusion. From the perspective of migrants themselves, language learning is mostly future-oriented, as access to linguistic resources is linked to a future identity of being part of an imagined community. It is thus regarded as a means for entering the labour market as well as higher education (Norton, 2013; Rydell, 2018b). However, with a strong focus on language and language learning, there is a risk that other factors of importance for migrants’ social inclusion are neglected (Dahlsted & Fejes, 2021; Simpson & Whitesand, 2015).

For adult migrants, adult education is a crucial setting for initial language learning (cf. Fejes & Dahlstedt, 2020a, 2020b). The main focus of initial language learning for adult migrants, as elaborated in European national as well as international policies, is the preparation of these individuals for the labour market, i.e., employability (Lindberg & Sandwall, 2017; Simpson & Whitesand, 2015). However, the relationship between language learning and the labour market is complex. It has been shown, for example, how in European countries migrant adult students during their work placement encounter limited access to interaction and learning opportunities, or that knowledge in English, rather than the local language of the new host country, could be sufficient for career opportunities. From a longitudinal perspective, it has been pointed out how those adult migrants who had participated in second language education after a 10-year period experienced a higher level of labour market participation than those who never attended such education. Meanwhile, no significant differences were found with respect to levels of income (for the Swedish example cf. Kennerberg & Åslund, 2010). However, other studies have illustrated that access to the labour market is not solely determined by migrants’ language proficiency, since migrants’ social mobility also depends on factors like educational background and social networks (cf. Behtoui & Olsson, 2014).

The relationship between migrants’ language learning, the labour market, and social inclusion is a complex one, and scholars are challenged to address it in this thematic issue. We invite contributions that problematise such relationships across different educational, labour market, and geographical contexts.

References

Behtoui, A., & Olsson, E. (2014). The performance of early age migrants in education and the labour market: A comparison of Bosnia Herzegovinians, Chileans and Somalis in Sweden. Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies, 40(5), 778–795.

Canagarajah, S. (2017). Introduction—The nexus of migration and language: The emergence of a disciplinary space. In S. Canagarajah (Ed.), The Routledge handbook of migration and language. Routledge.

Dahlstedt, M., & Fejes, A. (Eds.). (2021). Utbildning i migrationens tid: Viljor, organisering och villkor för inkludering [Education in times of migration: Wills, organization and conditions for inclusion]. Studentlitteratur.

Fejes, A., & Dahlstedt, M. (2020a). A place called home: The meaning(s) of popular education for newly arrived refugees. Studies in Continuing Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/0158037X.2020.1767563

Fejes, A., & Dahlstedt, M. (2020b). Language introduction as a space for the inclusion and exclusion of young asylum seekers in Sweden. International Journal of Qualitative Research on Health and Well-Being, 15(2). https://doi.org/10.1080/17482631.2020.1761196

Kennerberg, L., & Åslund, O. (2010). Sfi och arbetsmarknaden [SFI and the labor market]. IFAU.

Lindberg, I., & Sandwall, K. (2017). Conflicting agendas in Swedish adult second language education. In C. Kerfoot & K. Hyltenstam (Eds.), Entangled discourses: South-North orders of visibility. Routledge.

Norton, B. (2013). Identity and language learning: Extending the conversation. Multilingual Matters.

Rydell, M. (2018a). Constructions of language competence: Sociolinguistic perspectives on assessing second language interactions in basic adult education. Stockholm University.

Rydell, M. (2018b). Being “a competent language user” in a world of Others: Adult migrants’ perceptions and constructions of communicative competence. Linguistics and Education, 45, 101–109.

Simpson, J., & Whiteside, A. (2015). Adult language education and migration: Challenging agendas in policy and practice. Routledge.


Instructions for Authors:
Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's instructions for authors and submit their abstracts (maximum of 250 words, with a tentative title) through the abstracts system (here). When submitting their abstracts, authors are also asked to confirm that they are aware that Social Inclusion is an open access journal with a publishing fee if the article is accepted for publication after peer-review (corresponding authors affiliated with our institutional members do not incur this fee).


Open Access:
The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio's Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal's open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

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Volume 12, Issue 1

Title:
Community Development and Preventative Care With Older People: New Values and Approaches


Editor(s):
Fiona Verity (Swansea University), Frances Barker (Solva Care), Mark Llewellyn (University of South Wales), Simon Read (Swansea University), and Jonathan Richards (University of South Wales)

Submission of Abstracts: 1-15 March 2023
Submission of Full Papers: 15-31 July 2023
Publication of the Issue: January/March 2024

Information:

Recently there has been a chorus of demands to “re-imagine” social care. Community and faith-based organisations, policy, and academic communities are engaged in discussions on issues such as human rights for older populations, the future of residential-based aged care, how to better support family/community care, and strengthen local place-based community development. Moreover, the COVID-19 pandemic has added new urgency to this mission. From the perspective of C. Wright Mills’ sociological imagination, the private pains and suffering from the COVID-19 pandemic have exposed public troubles of endemic system failings and low investment in social care, including workforce gaps, prevailing discourses of ageism, tensions with health systems, and limitations of market models of care and support.

Set against this background, the subject of this thematic issue of Social Inclusion is a prevention agenda in social care for older people, with a focus on community development values and approaches. Prevention is a central social welfare principle in many countries. It is associated with policy and practices that aim to meet social care needs early, mitigating against the need for future support and assistance. While applied in the context of complex social problems, discourses of prevention are most coherent and established in the realm of public health (e.g., tertiary, secondary, and primary prevention). As Rapoport highlighted in the 1960s, however, translating the unified view of prevention associated with public health into social welfare is inherently problematic. This remains the case. Preventative social care and support necessarily operate in complex and dynamic systems, generally where knowledge of causation and the consequences are unclear, and an imaginative application of care needs and contexts is required.

Though current policy direction across many countries suggests opportunities for re-imagining how prevention may be best conceptualised, numerous studies have highlighted that there remains considerable confusion and disparity in how this plays out in practice. Prevention in social care can be implemented from mixed starting points, i.e., economic objectives, social justice objectives, and look different in practice. Included within this broad agenda are community development approaches and service delivery models driven by the needs of older people in their communities/localities, and collectively focused on common concerns and solutions.

This thematic issue will canvass questions such as:

  • What can be learnt from social care preventative practices with older people that use community development approaches?
  • How might older people be part of a reimagination of a preventative agenda in social care?
  • What can social enterprises and cooperatives contribute to advancing a prevention agenda in social care?
  • What might the marketisation of service delivery systems (e.g., individualised/direct payments) mean for community development solutions and approaches?
  • How can prevention in social care be better conceptualised?
  • What has been learnt from the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on older populations to inform a prevention agenda in social care?

Instructions for Authors:
Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's instructions for authors and submit their abstracts (maximum of 250 words, with a tentative title) through the abstracts system (here). When submitting their abstracts, authors are also asked to confirm that they are aware that Social Inclusion is an open access journal with a publishing fee if the article is accepted for publication after peer-review (corresponding authors affiliated with our institutional members do not incur this fee).


Open Access:
The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio's Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal's open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

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Volume 12, Issue 1

Title:
China and Climate Change: Towards a Socially Inclusive and Just Transition


Editor(s):
Lichao Yang (Beijing Normal University) and Robert Walker (Beijing Normal University)

Submission of Abstracts: 1-15 March 2023
Submission of Full Papers: 15-31 July 2023
Publication of the Issue: January/March 2024

Information:

China’s transition from a low-income country to the world’s second-largest economy has been fueled by coal. Coal in 2018 supplied 59% of China’s energy consumption and its carbon emissions are consistently great. In 2017, China was responsible for 26% of global carbon emissions, while the United States accounted for 14% and Europe for 10%.

On September 2020, and in preparation for COP26, China announced its intention to reach carbon neutrality before 2060 and to strive to ensure that emissions peaked before 2030: Integrated as a binding commitment in its 14th five-year plan, the country must achieve a cumulative 13.5% reduction in energy consumption per unit of GDP and an 18% decrease in carbon dioxide emission intensity. The social implications of these commitments are profound. With the 5.2 million coal miners accounting for 0.6% of the national workforce and contributing 0.5% to total GDP in 2017, 120,000 miners will need to be laid-off or redeployed annually. Supply-chain job losses will be even greater, geographically concentrated, and therefore with major impacts on local economies. The social costs of China’s already substantial shift towards a low carbon economy have not been equitably distributed. Top-down decision-making, lack of community participation, and strong vested interests have proved harmful to the most vulnerable workers in the already most disadvantaged communities.

Globally, the much-discussed concept of “just transition” is, however, rarely rigorously implemented. Often limited to equitable outcomes, we will argue that it should embrace procedural justice and reflect social, cultural, symbolic, and institutional circumstances. With a focus on China, this thematic issue invites authors to submit theoretical and empirical articles that address, among other possibilities:

  • The meaning of just transition;
  • Cultural, political, and structural obstacles to just transition;
  • Approaches to, and examples of, just transition.

If, as some argue, just transition is premised on liberal democracy, what relevance does it have in China?


Instructions for Authors:
Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal's instructions for authors and submit their abstracts (maximum of 250 words, with a tentative title) through the abstracts system (here). When submitting their abstracts, authors are also asked to confirm that they are aware that Social Inclusion is an open access journal with a publishing fee if the article is accepted for publication after peer-review (corresponding authors affiliated with our institutional members do not incur this fee).


Open Access:
The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio's Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal's open access charges and institutional members can be found here.